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Aging in Place 02
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
17 Nov 2013

"I was able to bring some of my children here: one, my eldest daughter lives in Yonkers; two are married and live in Pittsburgh. In Jamaica, they would not have had the opportunities they do here. Unfortunately I lost one of my boys: They say it was an accidental shooting, but you know… I pray, but everywhere I go [his death] is there. He was 21-years-old. I don’t blame America, it was gun violence. You have it in Jamaica. What I never experienced in Jamaica was racism." New York, October 2015.

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Aging in Place 15
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
17 Nov 2013

Felicita Chevalier sits in her bedroom. An activist and immigrant she is one of many seniors living at Serviam Gardens, which was set aside as housing for low income seniors in the borough. Eighty percent of Serviam residents earn less than fifty percent of the Federal Low Income Level and the majority are immigrants.Bronx, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 05
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

Munah Smith at home. In an otherwise young city where the median age is 29-years-old, the aging population is increasingly overlooked. Of New York CityÕs more than 8 million residents, over 1 million are 60 years or older. Almost half are immigrants with specific language and cultural needs. Spurred by the immigration boom of the 1980s and 1990s, the challenges this growing population contends with reveals critical issues concerning access to health care and quality of life for a graying New York City. Staten Island, October 2015

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Aging in Place 06
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

Munah Smith, an immigrant from Liberia, sits in the living room of her apartment in the Park Hill neighborhood of Staten Island with Blessing, the daughter of a young couple currently living with Munah, stands beneath her.
The Park Hill neighborhood is home to the largest Liberian community outside Liberia, an African country founded by freed American slaves in the 1840s. Many Liberians fled their country due to The Liberian Civil War that took place from 1986-1997. Munah lost both her husband and later her son to the conflict.
Staten Island, October 2015

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Aging in Place 07
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

Ms. Smith finds an outlet through her spirituality. She attends the nearby First Trinity Baptist Church, a small storefront church where many new comers and elders of the Liberian community go to worship and connect with each other. Staten Island, October 2015

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Aging in Place 08
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

Munah sits with the Deacon of the First Trinity Baptist Church. Staten Island, October 2015

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Aging in Place 09
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

Munah heads back to her apartment after church service. Staten Island, October 2015

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Aging in Place 10
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

The First Trinity Baptist Church is one of many small storefront churches that keep the Liberian community connected socially, culturally and spiritually. Staten Island, October 2015

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Aging in Place 11
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
13 Nov 2013

A detail of her hands, which were tattooed as a young girl in Liberia.

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Aging in Place 19
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
14 Sep 2013

As Nirmala got older, she realized many seniors in her community were not adjusting to aging outside of India well. She decided to start a senior group to preserve cultural activities like singing cooking and prayer in a social setting to help curb isolation and depression among her peers. Queens, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 20
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
14 Sep 2013

In an otherwise young city where the median age is 29-years-old, the aging population is increasingly overlooked. Of New York CityÕs more than 8 million residents, over 1 million are 60 years or older. Almost half are immigrants with specific language and cultural needs. Spurred by the immigration boom of the 1980s and 1990s, the challenges this growing population contends with reveals critical issues concerning access to health care and quality of life for a graying New York City. Queens, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 21
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
14 Sep 2013

Nirmala says good-bye to participants in her senior group. Queens, New York 2015

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Aging in Place 16
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
07 Sep 2013

Lubov came to the US to take care of her dying mother and to escape the increase of anti-Semitism in St. Petersburg, Russia. Upon arriving in New York she spoke no English and was terrified by the responsibility that had been placed upon her as the primary caregiver to her mother. Today she enjoys translating Russian poetry to english.

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Aging in Place 17
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
07 Sep 2013

Lubov signing karaoke at home. Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, New York July 2015

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Aging in Place 18
New York, USA
By Dana Ullman
05 Sep 2013

Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, New York July 2015

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Viome, a self-management factory in T...
thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

Before the beginning of the international crisis, Viome were a factory in Thessaloniki with around 80 workers. The factory produced chemical products for the construction sector, owned by Philippou family. The main company of the Philippou's group, Philkeram-Johnson S.A, were in bankrupt in 2011 and the consequences for Viome were immediately adverse. After institutional meetings without a clear solution, the workers decide to re-take the factory and the production. In September 2012, after a 48hours strike, the workers start to discuss the idea of self-management, and the 97% of workers vote for it.

After the occupation of the factory, on 12 February 2013, the workers started the self-management production, selling cleaning products. A huge solidarity movement support the workers, with national and international inititatives to promote and diffuse the "Viome way", where now workers control the factory, without any owner.

Around 40 people work in Viome, with a basic wage for everyone and 8 hours working time 5 days a week. The general assembly decide the main question and a weekly meeting discuss he more operative aspects. "At the beginning was difficult, but we are sure that our situation is gonna be better, even better than before the crisis", said a worker of Viome. Economic crisis and bad decision from the Viome's leadership, contribute to the difficult situation of the factory, with with the probable dismissal of around 80 workers.

Since the workers have retake the factory, they've started a new production of cleaning products, looking for a sustainable and ethical production, including workers rights and a big challenge: spread the idea that workers create everything, and the have to take bake what they onw, in any cities and countries around the world.

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Viome 22
Thessaloniki
By Michele Lapini
29 May 2013

“No worker who is not a shareholder, no shareholder who is not a worker,” say the workers of VIOME

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble
La Rinconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
30 Jan 2013

La Rinconada was a nice, quiet rural village in Peru’s Los Andes range twenty years ago. However, the economic crisis in the country and the discovery of gold changed the town completely during the nineties. Now, it is a crowded place where thousands of the poor from all over South America frequently immigrate looking for opportunity. The precious metal has transformed La Rinconada into a chaotic village of nearly 50,000 inhabitants (four times more than the past) with a serious lack of social services. The increase in the price of gold (25% last year and 600% in ten years) has pushed many more people to move up there. But gold is also an economic bubble that Rinconada has experienced, likely to deflate at any time (right now its price is experiencing a significant drop).
Nowadays, the landscape in La Rinconada is full of metallic shelters built without official permits. There is no pavement, sewers and running water. It is full of rubbish and defecation everywhere. It is now a place with serious problems of alcoholism, drugs and crime. The police is nearly absent and illegal prostitution is always present. The use of mercury to separate gold from rock has created a high level of pollution that provokes aggressiveness among the population. This, added to the fact that La Rinconada is about 6,000 meters altitude, causes also breath sicknesses (especially among children) and the local clinic covers just 10% of the needs. Despite some apparent efforts of the local administration, the situation is getting worse year by year.
Apart from a minority of entrepreneurs, mining families are under some terrible conditions of life and work and they invest their profits in the consumption of alcohol and, mainly, in buying expensive clothes for Carnival or annual holidays in their original villages. Most of the residents in La Rinconada are from the rural areas in Peru and Bolivia, without saving plans, so they will continue to go up to La Rinconada for more and more gold. At least, until the bubble will burst.
Photo collection by Albert González Farran.
View more photos: http://www.transterramedia.com/users/1696

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
29 Jan 2013

29 January 2013. La Rinconada: A nurse tests a prostitute working in a brothel in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru, on the HIV-AIDS. Around 1% of about 1,000 prostitutes in town get positive every year.
La Rinconada was a nice, quiet rural village in Peru’s Los Andes range twenty years ago. However, the economic crisis in the country and the discovery of gold changed the town completely during the nineties. Now, it is a crowded place where thousands of the poor from all over South America frequently immigrate looking for opportunity. The precious metal has transformed La Rinconada into a chaotic village of nearly 50,000 inhabitants (four times more than the past) with a serious lack of social services. The increase in the price of gold (25% last year and 600% in ten years) has pushed many more people to move up there.
Nowadays, the landscape in La Rinconada is full of metallic shelters built without official permits. There is no pavement, sewers and running water. It is full of rubbish and defecation everywhere. It is now a place with serious problems of alcoholism, drugs and crime. The police is nearly absent and illegal prostitution is always present. The use of mercury to separate gold from rock has created a high level of pollution that provokes aggressiveness among the population. This, added to the fact that La Rinconada is about 6,000 meters altitude, causes also breath sicknesses (especially among children) and the local clinic covers just 10% of the needs. Despite some apparent efforts of the local administration, the situation is getting worse year by year.
Photo by Albert González Farran.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 19
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
26 Jan 2013

A central street in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.
La Rinconada was a nice, quiet rural village in Peru’s Los Andes range twenty years ago. However, the economic crisis in the country and the discovery of gold changed the town completely during the nineties. Now, it is a crowded place where thousands of the poor from all over South America frequently immigrate looking for opportunity. The precious metal has transformed La Rinconada into a chaotic village of nearly 50,000 inhabitants (four times more than the past) with a serious lack of social services.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 18
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
24 Jan 2013

Cerro Lunar: Vanesa Canesa is photographed with her daughter Ana Paula in front of their little house, made with stones and "calamina" (metal layer), in Cerro Lunar, Ananea, Peru. Vanesa is a miner's wife and she used to support her husband working on "Pallaqueo" (collecting stones thrown from the mines looking for gold) and now she quit due to health reasons.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 20
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
23 Jan 2013

Left to right, Lucy Callpacruz and Norma Quispe (with her two children Eduardo Cristian and Chantal Ochoqui), both miner's wives, are pictured in their little house made with "calamina" (metal layer) in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru. Lucy has nine children and she is from Putina. From time to time, Lucy and Norma support their husbands working as "Pallaqueos" (selecting stones from the mine dumps looking for gold).

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 24
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
21 Jan 2013

A child is dressed by her mother after being assisted by a doctor at the health center in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru. Most of the children in La Rinconada suffer malnutrition and problems of growth due to cold weather and pollution.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 25
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) is pictured at work in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 3
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) is pictured at work in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 8
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) is pictured at work in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 5
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps) smokes cigarettes during a break in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 4
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps) prepares a shot of an alcoholic drink during a break in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 12
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
19 Jan 2013

Pallaqueras (women who select stones from the mine dumps looking for remains of gold) are pictured at work in a mining area in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 15
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A miner guides a truck inside a goldmine in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 16
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

An exhausted miner after drilling takes a rest and cleans his dirty face, while chewing coca leaf, inside a goldmine in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

17 January 2013. La Rinconada: A group of miners in a security check-point inside a goldmine in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru, are waiting their turn to work.
La Rinconada was a nice, quiet rural village in Peru’s Los Andes range twenty years ago. However, the economic crisis in the country and the discovery of gold changed the town completely during the nineties. Now, it is a crowded place where thousands of the poor from all over South America frequently immigrate looking for opportunity. The precious metal has transformed La Rinconada into a chaotic village of nearly 50,000 inhabitants (four times more than the past) with a serious lack of social services. The increase in the price of gold (25% last year and 600% in ten years) has pushed many more people to move up there.
Nowadays, the landscape in La Rinconada is full of metallic shelters built without official permits. There is no pavement, sewers and running water. It is full of rubbish and defecation everywhere. It is now a place with serious problems of alcoholism, drugs and crime. The police is nearly absent and illegal prostitution is always present. The use of mercury to separate gold from rock has created a high level of pollution that provokes aggressiveness among the population. This, added to the fact that La Rinconada is about 6,000 meters altitude, causes also breath sicknesses (especially among children) and the local clinic covers just 10% of the needs. Despite some apparent efforts of the local administration, the situation is getting worse year by year.
Photo by Albert González Farran.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 13
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

"Pallaqueras" (women who select stones from the mine dumps) attend the afternoon briefing with their colleagues and the engineers of Corporación Minera Ananea in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 2
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

La Rinconada: "Pallaqueras" (women who select stones from the mine dumps) go to work in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 6
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) works in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 9
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a man who selects stones from the mine dumps) is pictured at work in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

17 January 2013. La Rinconada: "Pallaqueras" (women who select stones from the mine dumps) eat and rest outside their huts during a break in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.
La Rinconada was a nice, quiet rural village in Peru’s Los Andes range twenty years ago. However, the economic crisis in the country and the discovery of gold changed the town completely during the nineties. Now, it is a crowded place where thousands of the poor from all over South America frequently immigrate looking for opportunity. The precious metal has transformed La Rinconada into a chaotic village of nearly 50,000 inhabitants (four times more than the past) with a serious lack of social services. The increase in the price of gold (25% last year and 600% in ten years) has pushed many more people to move up there.
Nowadays, the landscape in La Rinconada is full of metallic shelters built without official permits. There is no pavement, sewers and running water. It is full of rubbish and defecation everywhere. It is now a place with serious problems of alcoholism, drugs and crime. The police is nearly absent and illegal prostitution is always present. The use of mercury to separate gold from rock has created a high level of pollution that provokes aggressiveness among the population. This, added to the fact that La Rinconada is about 6,000 meters altitude, causes also breath sicknesses (especially among children) and the local clinic covers just 10% of the needs. Despite some apparent efforts of the local administration, the situation is getting worse year by year.
Photo by Albert González Farran.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 1
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) takes a rest outside her shelter in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 7
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps looking for gold) inspects some stones in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.

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La Rinconada, into the gold's bubble 26
La RInconada, Peru
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jan 2013

A "Pallaquera" (a woman who selects stones from the mine dumps) takes her selection back home at the end of the workday in La Rinconada, Ananea, Peru.