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Ali Mekhriev in Abastumani
Abastumani, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
31 Mar 2011

Ali Mekhriev in his garden in Abastumani. Ali was among the first to return to the village from where his father was deported in 1944. Ali says that his father had always told him that their family would one day return to Georgia. However, the return to Abastumani turned out to be not as smooth as one would have hoped for: the family home had long been leveled, and the locals gave them a rather cold and suspicious reception. Building peace with the Abastumani’s Christian community took a few years, and it did not come easy. “We have a perfect relationship now,” says Ali. “What really matters is the kind of person you are: if you are a reasonable person, you won’t have problems with others.”

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Abastumani Meskhetian
Abastumani, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
31 Mar 2011

Ali Mekhriev in his garden in Abastumani. Ali was among the first to return to the village from where his father was deported in 1944. Ali says that his father had always told him that their family would one day return to Georgia. However, the return to Abastumani turned out to be not as smooth as one would have hoped for: the family home had long been leveled, and the locals gave them a rather cold and suspicious reception. Building peace with the Abastumani’s Christian community took a few years, and it did not come easy. “We have a perfect relationship now,” says Ali. “What really matters is the kind of person you are: if you are a reasonable person, you won’t have problems with others.”

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Transgenders (17 of 20)
Yerevan, Armenia
By Nazik Armenakyan
25 Mar 2011

Layma, 30. Many of the transgender sex workers lived or live in Layma's apartment. She is working as a sex worker but dreams of having another job.

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Transgenders (8 of 20)
Yerevan, Armenia
By Nazik Armenakyan
25 Mar 2011

Layma, 30, many of transgendered sex workers lived or live in Layma's apartment. She is working as a sex worker but dreams of having another job.

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Transgenders (15 of 20)
Yerevan, Armenia
By Nazik Armenakyan
17 Feb 2011

Sometimes Lorena dances at the strip club with female dancers.

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Transgenders (9 of 20)
Yerevan, Armenia
By Nazik Armenakyan
16 Feb 2011

Sometimes Lorena is dancing at the strip club with female dancers.

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"Coat"
Warsaw, Poland
By Agnieszka Adamek
09 Feb 2011

Konrad Modzelewski performs mainly in front of child audience. It is his only source of income.

Cost: Konrad Modzelewski
Written and directed by Agnieszka Adamek
Photos: Matthew Wołoczko, George Bończyk
Editing: Mark Marlikowski
Production: oognet.pl

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Transgenders (3 of 20)
Yerevan, Armenia
By Nazik Armenakyan
26 Nov 2010

Lorena, in the park where transgenders work at night.

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Transgenders (2 of 20)
Yerevan, Armenia
By Nazik Armenakyan
26 Nov 2010

Despite numerous incidents of discrimination and harassment, the park next to Yerevan City Hall remains the only place where transgender sex workers can work openly.

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Minorities in Georgia (36 of 37)
Talaveri, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
15 Nov 2010

Villagers cut meat for Eid al-Adha festival near the mosque in Talaveri village, populated mostly by ethnic Azerbaijanis. In 2009 the construction of the mosque has stopped after a few Georgian Orthodox priests and members of ultra-religious organization The Union of the Orthodox Parents arrived to the village and demanded to stop the construction. The construction resumed in 2010 after the case was widely covered in the local media. The Union is notorious for its frequent protests, some of them ending with violence, against religious and sexual minorities, as well as public celebration of such "satanic" holidays as Halloween. Talaveri, 2010

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Minorities in Georgia ( 35 of 37)
Talaveri, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
15 Nov 2010

The construction of Talaveri mosque. In 2009 the construction of the mosque has stopped after a few Georgian Orthodox priests and members of ultra-religious organization The Union of the Orthodox Parents arrived to the village and demanded to stop the construction. The construction resumed in 2010 after the case was widely covered in the local media. The Union is notorious for its frequent protests, some of them ending with violence, against religious and sexual minorities, as well as public celebration of such "satanic" holidays as Halloween. Talaveri, 2010

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Transgenders (16 of 20)
Yerevan, Armenia
By Nazik Armenakyan
14 Sep 2010

A transgender party in one of the night clubs in Yerevan.

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Transgenders (12 of 20)
Yerevan, Armenia
By Nazik Armenakyan
13 Sep 2010

A transgender party in one of the night clubs in Yerevan.

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Transgenders (10 of 20)
Yerevan, Armenia
By Nazik Armenakyan
10 Sep 2010

A transgender party in one of the night clubs in Yerevan.

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Remembering Srebrenica (1 of 25)
Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
11 Jul 2010

Father with his daughter during the commemoration for the victims of Srebrenica genocide at the Potocari memorial center during the burial ceremony

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Remembering Srebrenica
Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By U.S. Editor
11 Jul 2010

Families gather to mourn the victims of Srebrenica genocide at the Potocari memorial center during the burial ceremony.

View more photos here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1237

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Remembering Srebrenica (2 of 25)
Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jul 2010

The coffins are passed hand to hand over the crowd of mourners inside the battery factory of Potocari before the burial ceremony

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Remembering Srebrenica (11 of 25)
Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jul 2010

People assisting while the coffins are being placed inside the hangar before the mass burial

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Remembering Srebrenica (12 of 25)
Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jul 2010

The coffins are passed hand to hand over the crowd of mourners inside the battery factory of Potocari before the burial ceremony

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Remembering Srebrenica (3 of 25)
Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jul 2010

Women crying over her son's coffin inside the hangar of Potochari before burial ceremony

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Remembering Srebrenica (13 of 25)
Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jul 2010

People mourning over their relative's coffin inside the hangar of Potochari before the burial ceremony

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Remembering Srebrenica (4 of 25)
Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jul 2010

The coffins are passed hand to hand over the crowd of mourners inside the battery factory of Potocari before the burial ceremony

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Remembering Srebrenica (14 of 25)
Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jul 2010

People mourning over their relative's coffin during the burial ceremony inside the memorial center of Potochari

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Remembering Srebrenica (15 of 25)
Potocari, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jul 2010

The coffins are passed hand to hand over the crowd of mourners inside the battery factory of Potocari before the burial ceremony

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Transgenders (11 of 20)
Yerevan, Armenia
By Nazik Armenakyan
10 May 2010

Vika, 21, is from Abovyan city. She lives with other transgender women in an apartment in Yerevan. She has been working as a sex worker for 2 years, but her family doesn’t know what she does.

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Transgender In Armenia
Yerevan, Armenia
By U.S. Editor
09 May 2010

My photo story portrays cross dressers and transgender women that engage in sex work in Yerevan, Armenia — the most vulnerable and at-risk group in Armenia. The subjects in my photographs are predominantly young adults who have been cast off from society, who cannot find another job because of their appearance. Many of them have had a difficult childhood; they were sexually assaulted at a young age, grew up in orphanages, lived in socially insecure situations or under the care of a single parent. Being deprived of family, education and employment, many of them chose the easiest though most dangerous way to make money. Many transgender sex workers dream of having another job, a house, a family. Sometimes they organize private transgender social gatherings, where they party and dance until dawn. Transgender sex workers mainly live apart from their families, renting alone, or with a few people (in the same apartment).

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Transgenders (14 of 20)
Yerevan, Armenia
By Nazik Armenakyan
07 May 2010

Lorena-Madonna, 25, grew up in an orphanage. She was sexually abused as a child. It’s been 6 years since she’s been working in the sex trade.

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Transgenders (5 of 20)
Yerevan, Armenia
By Nazik Armenakyan
07 May 2010

Vika, 21, is from Abovyan City. She lives with other transgender women in an apartment in Yerevan. She has been working as a sex worker for 2 years, but her family doesn’t know what she does.

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The Last Village
Bohoniki, Poland
By Kirk Ellingham
01 Mar 2010

Muslim Tartars in Poland

Bohoniki is a peaceful little village not far from Sokolka in the east of Poland,it is the last Tartar village before Belarus; maybe also the last of its kind.
There is no doubt that few people would have heard about it be it not for one fact: it was in this area that, in 1679, thirty Tatar soldiers were granted land for their faithful service to the Polish King Jan III Sobieski. A Tatar lady, who takes care of the Mosque, does not fail to stress that it was a reward for their valour in battle. Other sources simply say that the King was in financial straits and presented the land to his Tatar soldiers in lieu of due pay.
There are now only three Tatar families living in Bohoniki, but, considering that the village does not comprise more than thirty houses altogether, they make up about a fifth of the local population. And it is their Mosque that makes the village famous and attracts visitors from all over Poland and abroad.
Eugenia Radkieicz is the Mosque caretaker and you catch her dashing across the empty street to the small wooden Mosque when a tour bus arrives to conduct her lecture on the history of Bohoniki for groups of Polish schoolchildren.

The few families that remain are mostly elderly or sick, Evelina's father is bedridden and suffers from a Liver complaint. She takes care of the animials now and her mother worries about her future, as she must take care of them both when she gets older.
Many of the other family members are alone with their children working in cities as far afield as London to Riad.
Mrs Koztowska's son is in Spain and her elder son just returned from London, she cares for her blind husband who was injured as a boy by a German shell during World War II.
The community is still strong, the Iman comes in from Bialystock once a week for friday prayers and they are trying to set up a Religouse School in nearby Sokolka.
The village is changing though,as the young leave for foreign cities the old are left behind, but they have survived for 400 years in Poland , so they will survive still, by struggling and adapting.
The large Muslim cementary on the wooded hill just outside the village is proof of their endurance and intergration; with its Slavanised surnames and Muslim Crescents.

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Remembering Srebrenica
Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina
By giulianocamarda
10 Jan 2010

Mourners gather to mourn the victims of Srebrenica genocide at the Potocari memorial center during the burial ceremony.

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Minorities in Georgia ( 1 0f 37)
Plateh, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Sep 2009

In 2009 some locals of Plateh village started disassembling a long-abandoned local mosque in order to build monastic cells in the monastery nearby. The monks, who initiated the action, said that the mosque had no cultural value, nor did it belong to anybody. The dissasembling of the mosque stopped after the local muslim community notified the Public Defender's office. The mosques in Georgia's Adigeni region have been abandoned since 1944, when the most of region's Muslim population was deported to Central Asia. In the course of WWII, they were perceived by the Soviet government to be Turkey's potential allies.

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Minorities in Georgia (2 of 37)
Plateh, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Sep 2009

In 2009 some locals of Plateh village started disassembling a long-abandoned local mosque in order to build monastic cells in the monastery nearby. The monks, who initiated the action, said that the mosque had no cultural value, nor did it belong to anybody. The dissasembling of the mosque stopped after the local muslim community notified the Public Defender's office. The mosques in Georgia's Adigeni region have been abandoned since 1944, when the most of region's Muslim population was deported to Central Asia. In the course of WWII, they were perceived by the Soviet government to be Turkey's potential allies.

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Tskhaltubo
Tskhaltubo, Georgia
By Carsten Snejbjerg
14 Feb 2007

An estimated 300,000 people were displaced as a result of Georgias wars against two separatist military campaigns, one in the Black Sea region of Abkhazia in the northwest, and the other in the northeast region of South Ossetia. The war over Abkhazian, between 1992 and 1994, led to the displacement of mainly ethnic Georgians.

There are no running water in the rooms. The families have to collect the water from a post outside.