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Life in the Largest Syrian Refugee Ca...
Erbil
By Younes Mohammad
30 Mar 2015

March 30, 2015

Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan



Syrian refugees fled their country and arrived in Iraqi Kurdistan looking for assistance and a safe place to settle after the heavy clashes between the YPG and Al-Nusra front that took place in Rojava. The Kawrgosk refugee camp is currently the largest in Iraq but many of the refugees prefer to live on the outskirts of the city of Erbil. Iraq has recorded a total of 19, 844 Syrian refugees in the camps and aid is distributed to them by the UN, NGOs, and local and national bodies.

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Escaping Syria
Tripoli, Bekaa Valley
By Christina Malkoun
04 Dec 2013

March 6th 2013, one Million refugee officially registered at the centre in Tripoli, Lebanon. A number expected in June 2013. Today it is estimated that double this number have crossed into Lebanon, that's how much the situation is getting worse.
Since the Syrian revolution started in January 2011, families have escaped their home, leaving all their belongings behind, their houses destroyed, terrorised, looking for a safer place to live. In August 2011, the UNHCR launched the Tripoli registration centre, ensuring extension of services to persons under its mandate. 600 to 800 refugees register there every day. 2000 register daily in all of Lebanon. And today there are 7000 daily registrations throughout the region, in the countries of asylum, including Lebanon, Jordan, turkey, Egypt and Iraq.
This project is about portraying the lives of Syrian refugees across Lebanon; their struggles, their strength, their weaknesses, their hope of returning home... one day.
Are their rights as refugees being acknowledged? Being outside of their home country, are Syrian children having access to education? Are Syrian men and women being able to work independently to earn a living? Are Syrian elderly having access to health care?
"Please! Take a picture of me and my children. Let the world see!" said to me a syrian woman during a visit to Halba in Northern Lebanon. Disseminating those life abstracts can only generate and enhance awareness. More people are becoming conscious about the situation and are now more involved in helping the ones in need. Some photos are taken at the UNHCR centre in Tripoli, where men, women, children and elderly refugees gather and wait for their turn to register. They stand in front of the gates sometimes under heavy rains, with no shelter. After registering, they will eventually get the help they need. Other photos were taken in Halba, in tiny apartments where 20 people live under one roof. Some women found each other at the Women Association Centre of Northern Lebanon, and started learning and making accessories to earn a living, while others live off charity contributions. Some more photos were shot at the Beqaa Valley, where Syrian families wander around the streets to find a shelter, holding their babies in their arms, and hiding from the rain. But the generosity of the locals had been tremendous, taking them voluntarily under their roof. They are now refugees. A fate they did not choose.

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Living Space
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

A living space inside a makeshift Syrian shelter, with TV and paper walls.

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Refugee Living Room
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

A living room in a half-built apartment that houses eight Syrian families.

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Syria's Children And Syria
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By Docphot
13 Feb 2013

Children pose for a photo at a Syrian refugee camp in the Bekaa Vallery. The Syrian border is in the background.

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Syrian Refugees In The Bekaa
Dalhamiye, Lebanon
By U.S. Editor
13 Feb 2013

Refugees and camps in the initial stages of development, construction and without basic infrastructure.

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Syrian refugees in Jordan
Mafraq, Jordan
By Marina Fonda
25 Jan 2013

Syrian refugees in the Zaatari refugee camp, Mafraq, Northern Jordan, speak about their stories and perspectives. Full transcript and translation available on request.

00,57الجيش السوري هو من آذاني وهو المسؤول عن تحطيم جسدي والتسبب بعدة كسور فيه ، لقد كسر لي أضلاعي الاربعة اضافة لكسر في الجمجمة وانقراص في العمود الفقري ، خرجت من الاعتقال وفي كل سنتيميتر من جسدي كسر.
الكسور هذه هل هي بفعل الجيش النظامي؟ نعم من الجيش هل تم اعتقالك من الطريق العام؟ لا . لقد تم اعتقالي على أحد حواجز الجيش.

1,25 سقوط البراميل المتفجرة على منزلنا جعلت طفلي بسبب الخوف بفقد النطق .
هل فقد السمع والنطق؟ بالنسبة للسمع فقد خف لديه كثيراً فهو يسمع لكن بشكل خفيف ، أما النطق فقد فقده تماماً

1,44 حالات الاغتصاب كثيرة فهي جرت في عدة قرى وليس فقط في قرية "صيده" ، عندنا في خلال عمليات الاقتحام كانوت يحضرون النساء والاطفال "الجيش النظامي" , احدى المرات جرى اشتباك بيننا على جسر "صيده" فوضعوا امامنا سبعة أطفال أمام الدبابة بعمر طفلي..هل وضعوهم كدروع بشرية ؟ نعم .
وقبل هذه الحادثة جرى بيننا اشتباك على طريق داعل فوضعوا أمامنا فتاتين عاريتين ، فأدرنا ظهورنا وانسحبنا للخلف، لقد انسحبنا.

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Al Zaatari Refugee Camp
Mafraq, Jordan
By Mais Istanbuli
29 Dec 2012

Syrian Families at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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SYRIAN REFUGEES IN LEBANON - Beirut E...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Beirut Editor's Picks
18 Sep 2012

This photo collection shows a few Syrian families who are waiting to register their children with the UNHCR and the organization, Save the Children, so they can attend school in Lebanon after crossing over from Syria.
The latest report from the UNHCR states that over 67,960 Syrian refugees are in Lebanon, with 49,653 registered and over 18,307 in contact with UNHCR. While most children will be able to attend school in Lebanon, there have been many issues with refugees being denied because they lack proper paperwork. Another issue that is increasingly become more of a problem is that of child trauma, as reports say almost every child has seen someone killed and there are no resources available to provide counseling for the children, many of which are suffering from PTSD.

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.

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School In Baalbek For The Syrian Refu...
Lebanon,Baalbek
By Marta Bogdanska
18 Sep 2012

This family came from Homs in Syria.
The woman has three children. One of her daughters is married and has a child. There is also her son’s wife with them.
They arrived to Lebanon three weeks ago although the married daughter came here a month and a half ago.
They were in Al “Qaseer” in Homs but because of the worsening situation there they moved to Damascus, to “Alset Zainab” neighborhood. From there they moved to another neighborhood called Al “Abaseyeen”. Finally they went back to Homs. The heavy bombing started again and there were no taxis to take them out of there so they had to wait. After that they managed to go to “Al Tal” because they were informed that it was safe there. After two days the clashes started, they moved again to “Adra”. After being on the road for ten days they arrived to Lebanon. They couldn’t take anything with them, not even clothes. They crossed the border illegally, walking through the mountains.
Life in Lebanon is much better for them than in Syria. At least children are not scared and can sleep at night. They also received medical treatment because they were sick in Syria and couldn’t get any help there. Children can go to school although her daughter’s child won’t be able to register now because they don’t have the needed documents.