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Life in the Largest Syrian Refugee Ca...
Erbil
By Younes Mohammad
30 Mar 2015

March 30, 2015

Erbil, Iraqi Kurdistan



Syrian refugees fled their country and arrived in Iraqi Kurdistan looking for assistance and a safe place to settle after the heavy clashes between the YPG and Al-Nusra front that took place in Rojava. The Kawrgosk refugee camp is currently the largest in Iraq but many of the refugees prefer to live on the outskirts of the city of Erbil. Iraq has recorded a total of 19, 844 Syrian refugees in the camps and aid is distributed to them by the UN, NGOs, and local and national bodies.

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Ghouta Under Siege
Eastern Ghouta, Syria
By mchreyteh
09 Apr 2014

في الغوطة الشرقية المحاصرة القصف لا يهدأ. يلجأ الناس الى استخدام علف المواشي وحبوب الذرة المتعفنة لصناعة الخبز. حاجة السكان للكهرباء جعلتهم يبحثون عن سبل بدائية لتوليد الطاقة عبر صناعات يدوية. وبعد توقف معظم المستشفيات عن العمل، تحل النساء مكان الطواقم الطبية بعد الالتحاق بدورات تدريبية على الاسعافات الاولية.

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Escaping Syria
Tripoli, Bekaa Valley
By Christina Malkoun
04 Dec 2013

March 6th 2013, one Million refugee officially registered at the centre in Tripoli, Lebanon. A number expected in June 2013. Today it is estimated that double this number have crossed into Lebanon, that's how much the situation is getting worse.
Since the Syrian revolution started in January 2011, families have escaped their home, leaving all their belongings behind, their houses destroyed, terrorised, looking for a safer place to live. In August 2011, the UNHCR launched the Tripoli registration centre, ensuring extension of services to persons under its mandate. 600 to 800 refugees register there every day. 2000 register daily in all of Lebanon. And today there are 7000 daily registrations throughout the region, in the countries of asylum, including Lebanon, Jordan, turkey, Egypt and Iraq.
This project is about portraying the lives of Syrian refugees across Lebanon; their struggles, their strength, their weaknesses, their hope of returning home... one day.
Are their rights as refugees being acknowledged? Being outside of their home country, are Syrian children having access to education? Are Syrian men and women being able to work independently to earn a living? Are Syrian elderly having access to health care?
"Please! Take a picture of me and my children. Let the world see!" said to me a syrian woman during a visit to Halba in Northern Lebanon. Disseminating those life abstracts can only generate and enhance awareness. More people are becoming conscious about the situation and are now more involved in helping the ones in need. Some photos are taken at the UNHCR centre in Tripoli, where men, women, children and elderly refugees gather and wait for their turn to register. They stand in front of the gates sometimes under heavy rains, with no shelter. After registering, they will eventually get the help they need. Other photos were taken in Halba, in tiny apartments where 20 people live under one roof. Some women found each other at the Women Association Centre of Northern Lebanon, and started learning and making accessories to earn a living, while others live off charity contributions. Some more photos were shot at the Beqaa Valley, where Syrian families wander around the streets to find a shelter, holding their babies in their arms, and hiding from the rain. But the generosity of the locals had been tremendous, taking them voluntarily under their roof. They are now refugees. A fate they did not choose.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Kafranbel, the choice of democracy (1...
Kafranbel, Syria
By Marie
13 Apr 2013

Kafranbel inhabitants sing « Kafranbel won't die, Syria is united ». The media activist Mohammad launches into slogans that demonstrators sing along all together.

Les habitants de Kafranbel, chantent « Kafranbel ne mourra pas, la Syrie est unie ». Mohammad activiste média entonne les slogans que les manifestants reprennent en cœur.

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Syrian Scarvengers in Beirut
Beirut, Lebanon
By Elie-Louis
31 Dec 2012

They are called “Scarvengers”, “garbage kids”, or “Syrian kids”, like Ali and Salem, two Syrians that we can meet in the eastern suburb of Beirut. They are at best twenty years old altogether, but the strength of their handshaking suggests they are the double. Everyday, they go back and forth between the highway and the sea to find any kind of metals that can be resold.
Whereas they were also Palestinians or Egyptians, this “job” is now only for Syrians. All came because of the war, leaving their family there, sending it money every month. Mawour have left his pregnant wife since 7 months. Collecting cartoons, he earns around 10 $ per day, 300 $ per months, and try to send to her wife what he can save. A very low salary that has been lowered with the big afflux of Syrians men looking for jobs to feed their family stayed in Syria.
Zouair is fourteen. He came here from Deir Ezzor, an eastern Syrian city, since 9 months. With his dad, he collects metals from garage and sells it back to a recycling centre.
Although this job is not well perceived, it is answering a lack of engagement from the municipality and the inhabitants to waste sorting. Few separated dumpster have been installed in Lebanon, but they are not used at all. As a consequence, some Syrians collect the garbage, open them, and take in it what can be recycled and sold. In Bourj Hammoud, an area in the eastern suburb of Beirut, a sorting centre has been improvised in the road, taking sometimes mostly half of it. Hani, 22 years old, is receiving all the garbage from the area. With his little hands, without gloves, he selects what can be reused. The rest is taken by the Sukleen’s trucks (the Company in charge of the collect of garbages), which come regularly. “Even if this work is dirty, degrading, and sometimes dangerous, at least I have my money at the end of the day. Before this, I was working in construction buildings. It’s more money, but the boss abuse and play with you, paying you whenever he wants”, says Hani, garbage selector since two months.

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Syrian Scarvengers in Beirut
Beirut, Lebanon
By Elie-Louis
31 Dec 2012

They are called “Scarvengers”, “garbage kids”, or “Syrian kids”, like Ali and Salem, two Syrians that we can meet in the eastern suburb of Beirut. They are at best twenty years old altogether, but the strength of their handshaking suggests they are the double. Everyday, they go back and forth between the highway and the sea to find any kind of metals that can be resold.
Whereas they were also Palestinians or Egyptians, this “job” is now only for Syrians. All came because of the war, leaving their family there, sending it money every month. Mawour have left his pregnant wife since 7 months. Collecting cartoons, he earns around 10 $ per day, 300 $ per months, and try to send to her wife what he can save. A very low salary that has been lowered with the big afflux of Syrians men looking for jobs to feed their family stayed in Syria.
Zouair is fourteen. He came here from Deir Ezzor, an eastern Syrian city, since 9 months. With his dad, he collects metals from garage and sells it back to a recycling centre.
Although this job is not well perceived, it is answering a lack of engagement from the municipality and the inhabitants to waste sorting. Few separated dumpster have been installed in Lebanon, but they are not used at all. As a consequence, some Syrians collect the garbage, open them, and take in it what can be recycled and sold. In Bourj Hammoud, an area in the eastern suburb of Beirut, a sorting centre has been improvised in the road, taking sometimes mostly half of it. Hani, 22 years old, is receiving all the garbage from the area. With his little hands, without gloves, he selects what can be reused. The rest is taken by the Sukleen’s trucks (the Company in charge of the collect of garbages), which come regularly. “Even if this work is dirty, degrading, and sometimes dangerous, at least I have my money at the end of the day. Before this, I was working in construction buildings. It’s more money, but the boss abuse and play with you, paying you whenever he wants”, says Hani, garbage selector since two months.

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Syrian Scarvengers in Beirut
Beirut, Lebanon
By Elie-Louis
31 Dec 2012

They are called “Scarvengers”, “garbage kids”, or “Syrian kids”, like Ali and Salem, two Syrians that we can meet in the eastern suburb of Beirut. They are at best twenty years old altogether, but the strength of their handshaking suggests they are the double. Everyday, they go back and forth between the highway and the sea to find any kind of metals that can be resold.
Whereas they were also Palestinians or Egyptians, this “job” is now only for Syrians. All came because of the war, leaving their family there, sending it money every month. Mawour have left his pregnant wife since 7 months. Collecting cartoons, he earns around 10 $ per day, 300 $ per months, and try to send to her wife what he can save. A very low salary that has been lowered with the big afflux of Syrians men looking for jobs to feed their family stayed in Syria.
Zouair is fourteen. He came here from Deir Ezzor, an eastern Syrian city, since 9 months. With his dad, he collects metals from garage and sells it back to a recycling centre.
Although this job is not well perceived, it is answering a lack of engagement from the municipality and the inhabitants to waste sorting. Few separated dumpster have been installed in Lebanon, but they are not used at all. As a consequence, some Syrians collect the garbage, open them, and take in it what can be recycled and sold. In Bourj Hammoud, an area in the eastern suburb of Beirut, a sorting centre has been improvised in the road, taking sometimes mostly half of it. Hani, 22 years old, is receiving all the garbage from the area. With his little hands, without gloves, he selects what can be reused. The rest is taken by the Sukleen’s trucks (the Company in charge of the collect of garbages), which come regularly. “Even if this work is dirty, degrading, and sometimes dangerous, at least I have my money at the end of the day. Before this, I was working in construction buildings. It’s more money, but the boss abuse and play with you, paying you whenever he wants”, says Hani, garbage selector since two months.

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Syrian Scarvengers in Beirut
Beirut, Lebanon
By Elie-Louis
31 Dec 2012

They are called “Scarvengers”, “garbage kids”, or “Syrian kids”, like Ali and Salem, two Syrians that we can meet in the eastern suburb of Beirut. They are at best twenty years old altogether, but the strength of their handshaking suggests they are the double. Everyday, they go back and forth between the highway and the sea to find any kind of metals that can be resold.
Whereas they were also Palestinians or Egyptians, this “job” is now only for Syrians. All came because of the war, leaving their family there, sending it money every month. Mawour have left his pregnant wife since 7 months. Collecting cartoons, he earns around 10 $ per day, 300 $ per months, and try to send to her wife what he can save. A very low salary that has been lowered with the big afflux of Syrians men looking for jobs to feed their family stayed in Syria.
Zouair is fourteen. He came here from Deir Ezzor, an eastern Syrian city, since 9 months. With his dad, he collects metals from garage and sells it back to a recycling centre.
Although this job is not well perceived, it is answering a lack of engagement from the municipality and the inhabitants to waste sorting. Few separated dumpster have been installed in Lebanon, but they are not used at all. As a consequence, some Syrians collect the garbage, open them, and take in it what can be recycled and sold. In Bourj Hammoud, an area in the eastern suburb of Beirut, a sorting centre has been improvised in the road, taking sometimes mostly half of it. Hani, 22 years old, is receiving all the garbage from the area. With his little hands, without gloves, he selects what can be reused. The rest is taken by the Sukleen’s trucks (the Company in charge of the collect of garbages), which come regularly. “Even if this work is dirty, degrading, and sometimes dangerous, at least I have my money at the end of the day. Before this, I was working in construction buildings. It’s more money, but the boss abuse and play with you, paying you whenever he wants”, says Hani, garbage selector since two months.

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Syrian Scarvengers in Beirut
Beirut, Lebanon
By Elie-Louis
31 Dec 2012

They are called “Scarvengers”, “garbage kids”, or “Syrian kids”, like Ali and Salem, two Syrians that we can meet in the eastern suburb of Beirut. They are at best twenty years old altogether, but the strength of their handshaking suggests they are the double. Everyday, they go back and forth between the highway and the sea to find any kind of metals that can be resold.
Whereas they were also Palestinians or Egyptians, this “job” is now only for Syrians. All came because of the war, leaving their family there, sending it money every month. Mawour have left his pregnant wife since 7 months. Collecting cartoons, he earns around 10 $ per day, 300 $ per months, and try to send to her wife what he can save. A very low salary that has been lowered with the big afflux of Syrians men looking for jobs to feed their family stayed in Syria.
Zouair is fourteen. He came here from Deir Ezzor, an eastern Syrian city, since 9 months. With his dad, he collects metals from garage and sells it back to a recycling centre.
Although this job is not well perceived, it is answering a lack of engagement from the municipality and the inhabitants to waste sorting. Few separated dumpster have been installed in Lebanon, but they are not used at all. As a consequence, some Syrians collect the garbage, open them, and take in it what can be recycled and sold. In Bourj Hammoud, an area in the eastern suburb of Beirut, a sorting centre has been improvised in the road, taking sometimes mostly half of it. Hani, 22 years old, is receiving all the garbage from the area. With his little hands, without gloves, he selects what can be reused. The rest is taken by the Sukleen’s trucks (the Company in charge of the collect of garbages), which come regularly. “Even if this work is dirty, degrading, and sometimes dangerous, at least I have my money at the end of the day. Before this, I was working in construction buildings. It’s more money, but the boss abuse and play with you, paying you whenever he wants”, says Hani, garbage selector since two months.

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Aleppo Destroyed...
Syria, Aleppo
By ameryaseen
14 Sep 2012

Aleppo, Al Sha'ar, behind Dar Al Shifa hospital.