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NuJiang (11 of 25)
FuGong, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
03 Aug 2012

Drivers and passengers loading some luggage and other stuff on the roof of a mini-bus, in the courtyard of the bus station in FuGong.

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NuJiang (4 of 25)
Nujiang, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
03 Aug 2012

A woman from the DuLong (also Derung) minority, coming back to the valley after a long journey to BeiJing, looks to the river and the morning clouds outisde the bus window.

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NuJiang (5 of 7)
Nujiang, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
03 Aug 2012

A group of people from the Lisu minority gathering at a small settlement along the road of the NuJiang Valley, as seen from the window of a mini-bus.

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NuJiang (3 of 25)
Liuku, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
02 Aug 2012

A view of Liuku, as seen from the window of the mini-bus. The writing on the mountain says : Nù Jiāng Dà Xiá Gǔ (怒江大峡谷) , that means Nu River Grand Canyon.

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NuJiang (2 of 25)
Liuku, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
02 Aug 2012

The Waiting room of the bus station in LiuKu, the town at the bottom of the NuJiang Valley. The small portraits are identification cards of the people working in the station.

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A Nepalese boy's fight against autism...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
10 May 2012

Though Kreet's parents are medical doctors it was very difficult for them to diagnose Kreet's autism. “To add to the woes, being a doctor and living with pediatricians also didn’t help us to figure out that Kreet was autistic,” Kapendra Amatya, Kreet's father, says. On 28, August 2008 the parents discovered that Kreet had autism.

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A Nepalese boy's fight against autism...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
18 Apr 2012

When Kreet was around 18 to 19 months, he stopped speaking the words that he had been learning. Sunita, his mother, could feel that her child was different but she really didn’t know what it was.

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A Nepalese boy's fight against autism...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
06 Mar 2012

Seven year-old Kreet Amatya is ready for his classes at 5 :30 p.m. He repeats what his mother says. ‘A’ for ‘apple’, B for ‘ball’, and it goes on an on.
The class is an unusual one however, because Kreet is the only student in the room, following his mother’s instructions and trying to understand her gestures, signs and symbols.

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A Nepalese boy's fight against autism...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
28 Feb 2012

For his parents Kreet is not a nuisance in the family, not even a problem, but instead he offers a different opportunity to look into life, to understand life and be loving and supportive to their son as much as possible. However, the general perception that the relatives and neighbors have toward Kreet is what really disturbs them.

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A Nepalese boy's fight against autism...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
24 Feb 2012

Kreet looks out of the window of the autism center where he learns things that interests him.

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A Nepalese boy's fight against autism...
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
24 Feb 2012

Kreet is a special child. He is one among many autistic children in Nepal who are suffering from a lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder called Autism.