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75th ANNIVERSARY OF THE NANJING MASSA...
Nanjing, China
By Editor's Picks
12 Dec 2012

On December 13, 1937, the Japanese Imperial Army invaded China, occupying Nanjing, China's former capital city. Over the course of six weeks, the Japanese murdered over 300,ooo Chinese citizens, and were accused of raping more than 20,000 women. The museum in Nanjing holds thousands of mementos and films of the victims of the atrocity. To this day, Japan has not issued an apology for the crimes of the Imperial Army.

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75th Anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre
Nanjing, China
By Mais Istanbuli
12 Dec 2012

On December 13, 1937, the Japanese Imperial Army invaded China, occupying Nanjing, China's former capital city. Over the course of six weeks, the Japanese murdered over 300,ooo Chinese citizens, and were accused of raping more than 20,000 women. The museum in Nanjing holds thousands of mementos and films of the victims of the atrocity. To this day, Japan has not issued an apology for the crimes of the Imperial Army.

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75th Anniversary of the Nanjing Massa...
Nanjing, China
By amandamustard
12 Dec 2012

Chinese military troops rehearse their ceremonial procession. Thousands gather at the Memorial Hall in Nanjing to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, of which fewer than 200 survivors currently remain. On December 13, 1937, Japanese troops began the occupation of the then capital of China. According to the 1946-1948 Tokyo War Crimes Trials, over 300,000 Chinese were killed and at least 20,000 were raped over the course of six weeks. Hundreds of testimonies, diaries, photographs and film reels depict mass executions and brutal cases of torture and rape. Despite evidence, some Japanese officials have disputed the massacre’s legitimacy. As a formal apology has yet to be made, this disparity remains to be an underlying resentment in Sino-Japanese relations, even after 75 years have past.

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Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall
Nanjing, China
By amandamustard
30 Nov 2012

A man listens to the testimony of a survivor through telephones at the Nanjing Massacre Memorial Hall. Behind him, a vast wall of files are kept, each for a victim of the massacre. Thousands gather annually at the museum in Nanjing to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Nanjing Massacre, of which fewer than 200 survivors currently remain. On 13 December 1937, Japanese troops began the occupation of the then capital of China. According to the 1946-1948 Tokyo War Crimes Trials, over 300,000 Chinese were killed and at least 20,000 were raped over the course of six weeks. Despite evidence, some Japanese officials have disputed the massacre’s legitimacy (or sometimes existence). As a formal apology has yet to be made, this disparity remains to be an underlying resentment in Sino-Japanese relations.

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Wildlife Crimes (44 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
29 Oct 2012

A lady wears an Ivory necklace in Tha Phrachan market, Bangkok, Thailand. Ornamental ivory is valued for both spiritual and aesthetic reasons and fetches high prices.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (42 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
29 Oct 2012

Ivory braclets on sale in Tha Phrachan market, Thailand. Ornamental ivory is valued for both spiritual and aesthetic reasons and fetches high prices.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (43 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
29 Oct 2012

An officer from the Natural Resource and Environment Crime Suppression Division (NRESCD) inspects a shop selling ivory in Tha Phrachan market, Bangkok, Thailand. Ornamental ivory is valued for both spiritual and aesthetic reasons and fetches high prices.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (36 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

An exorcist's knife for sale in Bangkok. The handle and sheath are made from Ivory.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (37 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

An amulet store owner inspects a statue of an ascetic monk made from Ivory. He will sell it for 35,000 baht (1,200 USD)

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (40 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

Dr Suchitra Changtragoon, the lead researcher at the Department of National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation's biolab is in charge of conducting DNA tests on confiscated ivory. African Ivory is illegal, wereas, confusingly, Asian Ivory is not.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (38 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

Researchers at the Department of National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation's biolab conduct DNA tests on confiscated Ivory in order to determine it source of origin and thus prosecute people found in possession of African Ivroy.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (41 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

Researchers at the Department of National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation's biolab conduct DNA tests on tiger blood and other animal parts in order to try and crack down on the illegal trade. Bangkok, Thailand.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (35 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
27 Oct 2012

The head of the infantry unit on patrol in Kui Buri National park.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (32 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
26 Oct 2012

In light of the recent escalation in poaching the Thai government have assigned a unit of xxx to help tackle the poaching issue.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (34 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
26 Oct 2012

In light of the recent escalation in poaching the Thai government have assigned a special ops military unit to help tackle the poaching issue. This military outfit patrol the border between Thailand and Myanmar looking for tiger smugglers and other wildlife criminals.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (27 of 47)
Suvarnabhumi, Bangkok
By James Morgan
24 Oct 2012

Workers at the customs department in Bangkok's Suvarnabhumi Airport open a box of seized Ivory.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (29 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
24 Oct 2012

Customs officials in Bangkok's Suvarnabhumi airport uncover a shipment of African elephant tusks from Mozambique. Suvarnabhumi has always been a hub for illicit trafficking, mostly in narcotics, but the recent explosion of demand for animal products has added elephant tusks to the list of contraband.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (30 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
24 Oct 2012

Customs officials in Bangkok's Suvarnabhumi airport uncover a shipment of African elephant tusks from Mozambique. Suvarnabhumi has always been a hub for illicit trafficking, mostly in narcotics, but the recent explosion of demand for animal products has added elephant tusks to the list of contraband.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (25 of 47)
Kuchanabri, Thailand
By James Morgan
23 Oct 2012

A worker at the Kuchanaburi tiger temple counts money.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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India Shut Down: Life hit at many pla...
C-58 Noida up
By newspoint
20 Sep 2012

The day-long nationwide shut down called for by the Left parties and NDA on Thursday, demanding a rollback of the government's decision to hike diesel prices, cap subsidised cooking gas cylinders and allow foreign direct investment (FDI) in multi-brand retail, has hit life in many places and businesses in the country.
The Bhartiya Janta Party (BJP) Youth wing’s activists blocked rail traffic, stopping trains.
 Members of Political parties like Samajwadi Party (SP), CPM, CPI, TDP, BJD, JD (S), Trimul Congress (TMC) All India Forward Bloc and the RSP have plans to organise picketing, demonstrations and court arrest.

Byte: Nitin Gatkari , National President of Bhartiya Janta party (BJP)
“Economic decisions taken by the Congress would impact the poor and labourers, and the party would continue to fight them”. Byte: Salman Khurshid , Law Minister of India Visual & Byte Description:
1-Delhi
2-Lucknow (Utter Pradesh)
3-Jaipur (Rajsthan)
4-Hamirpur (Utter Pradesh)
Byte: Nitin Gatkari , National President of Bhartiya Janta party (BJP)
Byte: Salman Khurshid , Law Minister of India

Date-20 Sept 2012
Country : India
Slug: India Shut Down: Life hit at many places, trains stopped, PM's effigy burnt

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Songs from Karakul Lake
Karakul Lake, Kizilsu Kirgiz Autonomous Prefecture, China
By aruszka
05 Sep 2012

Located in Kizilsu Kirghiz Autonomous Prefecture, Karakul Lake, also known as the "Black lake," is home to this child who lives alone in a necropolis along the shore.

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Inside the War on Wildlife Crime
Central Africa and East Asia
By Serene Yordi
27 Aug 2012

Wildlife trafficking in Africa has become a major source of finance for armed groups and criminal networks. In countries like Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Sudan and Kenya, poachers move across borders with near impunity.

Governments like Gabon are becoming increasingly alarmed by the threat posed by wildlife trafficking to national security. Rebel groups, drug syndicates and even terrorist networks have seen an opportunity to profit from a low risk, high reward criminal enterprise. To safeguard its remaining elephants, Gabon President Ali Bongo has quadrupled the number of park rangers in the country. Bongo also presided over the burning of $10 million of illegal Ivory seized from poachers, to ensure that none leaked back into the illegal trade.

On the other end of the trade, the final products are nearly unrecognizable. Jewelry and amulets made from ivory are sold in up-scale, air conditioned Thai boutiques whilst other animal parts are used in traditional medicines.

Wildlife crime not only threatens nature’s most iconic species, but exacerbates poverty and corruption, funding an entire spectrum of related international crime. These images trace the story from beginning to end, across continents, offering a sense of the fragility of the human lives that lie in its wake.

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NuJiang (17 of 25)
Fugong, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
09 Aug 2012

A man is playing pool under a plastic sheet, at a checkpoint on the banks of the NuJiang River. Work is scarce, and it’s not unusual to find men playing cards or pool during some lazy afternoons.

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NuJiang (20 of 25)
Fugong, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
09 Aug 2012

Workers set up the road between Fugong and GongShan, on the banks of the NuJiang River in Yunnan, China. In order to open and enlarge the road these men dig the mountain on one side, and then throw the rocks inside the river, to create a wider base.

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NuJiang (25 of 25)
Liuku, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
09 Aug 2012

A tuctuc riding up the road to FuGong at sunset, as seen from the windshield of a mini-bus headed back to LiuKu.

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NuJiang (23 of 25)
FuGong, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
09 Aug 2012

A family is eating under the porch of their house, just on the roadside close to FuGong.

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NuJiang (14 of 25)
FuGong,Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
09 Aug 2012

Lisu minority wimen walk on the side of the road after getting down from a mini-bus, heading home.

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NuJiang (16 of 25)
FuGong, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
09 Aug 2012

Minority people outside their shack, as seen along the road of the NuJiang Valley. In these remote areas the minorities aren’t taking any share of the development of the area, but are slowly pushed to the borders of the towns, collecting recyclables.

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NuJiang (21 of 25)
Fugong, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
09 Aug 2012

Workers jump on the load body of a truck, waiting to go back home for lunch. The working conditions are often extreme in these forgotten towns, with bamboo scaffoldings and men on the edge of the chasm barely tied with a jute rope.

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NuJiang (8 of 25)
NuJiang, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
09 Aug 2012

A man is repairing the electricity cables close to the road, hanging from a rope above the NuJiang River.

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NuJiang (6 of 25)
Fugong, Ynnan, China
By Teo Butturini
09 Aug 2012

A worker rests on the side of the road in the NuJiang Valley, Yunnan, as seen fro the window of a mini-bus.

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NuJiang (18 of 25)
GongShan, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
08 Aug 2012

A shepherd walks his herd along the road of the NuJiang Valley, close to the town of BingZhongLuo. While cattle is quite scarce over there, sheeps, goats, pigs and chickens are very popular among the local people.

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NuJiang (19 of 25)
BingZhongLuo, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
05 Aug 2012

The socalled “first bend” of the NuJiang River (eventhough this one isn't really the first one), and it's one of the most popular sights. The NuJiang has its source on the QingHai Mountains in Tibet and flows to Burma where its name is Salween.

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NuJiang (10 of 25)
GongShan, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
05 Aug 2012

Local people living in a traditional wood house with stone tiles roof, right on the bank of the river.

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NuJiang (24 of 25)
BingZhongLuo, Yunnan China
By Teo Butturini
05 Aug 2012

A mini-bus driver approaching a bridge on a tributary of the NuJiang River, between the towns of GongShan and BingZhongLuo.

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NuJiang (1 of 25)
GongShan, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
04 Aug 2012

Elderly man behind the counter in the small town of GongShan, Yunnan, China.

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NuJiang (7 of 25)
Fugong, Yunna, China
By Teo Butturini
03 Aug 2012

A sight of the NuJiang Valley's road from inside a mini-bus. The road is quite dangerous, as it's still unfinished and subject to landslides. Here the driver is seen on the dirt while smoking a cigarette and talking with his mobile phone.

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NuJiang (15 of 25)
Fugong, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
03 Aug 2012

Two kids play outside their house minutes before sunset, as seen from the bus window at stop between Fugong and GongShan.

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NuJiang: A Road Trip into Traditional...
Fugong Yunna, China
By Teo Butturini
03 Aug 2012

Pictures from the bus,along the road that follows the NuJiang Valley in Yunnan, China, which is the most remote of the Three Parallel Rivers that make up the homonymous UNESCO reserve.

The NuJiang is a river that springs from the Tibet plateu down to Yunnan, and later on to Myanmar (Burma where its name changes to Salween. Here it marks the border with Thailand and then flows into the Andaman Sea.
It's one of the longest undammed rivers in the world, and it's part of the Three Parallel Rivers reserve, a UNESCO Heritage site that includes also the YangTze River and the Mekong (which chinese name is Cang Lang).
It's one of the places with the richest biodiversity in the world, and it's home of 7 out of the 26 ethnical minorities that live in Yunnan.
Human development and tourism are greatly endangering the area, that is also target of a dam project even bigger than the one realized at the Three Gorges, in the Hubei province.

Here is a series of pictures taken from some of the minibuses that everyday travel up and down the valley, from the bottom town of LiuKu up to BingZhongLuo and QiuNaTong.
The places and the faces of this forgotten valley, a road trip into a traditional China that is slowly disappearing.