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Desperate Living Conditions in Rebel-...
Jobar
By abdalmanamissa
26 Feb 2015

Jobar, Syria
February 26, 2015

The Damascus suburb of Jobar has been transformed into a devastated ghost town after more than more than two years of heavy battles between government and opposition fighters have failed to bring decisive victory to either side.

The very few civilians who remain in the neighborhood gather broken doors and furniture from wrecked homes to provide firewood.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

R-L pan of destroyed building
Traveling of road
Traveling of tunnel
Traveling of three children amid destruction
Various traveling of streets
Various of man chipping wood
Various/ traveling of roads
Wide of two women walking amide destroyed buildings
Various/ traveling of roads
Wide of destroyed building
Wide/ zoom in of two children carrying wood
Various of men sitting around a fire
Wide of fighters
Close-up of axe chopping wood
Wide/ zoom out of men carrying large bags

04:00 – 04:47

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Ahmed, a fighter in Jobar Neighborhood

“As you can see, there are no civilians. There is no firewood nor any other means of heating. There is no electricity or diesel. All of this disappeared a long time ago. [NAT Sound: Heavy gunshot]. People come under shelling and shooting as they gather firewood. They take wood from wrecked houses and cut down trees – anything that can be used to provide heating because there is no diesel. People of all ages are doing what it takes to manage. They come all the way from over there. God, not us, is protecting them. They gather some firewood and then leave. The situation is extremely tragic. It is more difficult for civilians than it is for us.“

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed fighter in Jobar Neighborhood
04:48 – 05:36

“As you can see, dear brother, the situation is deplorable. People suffer from the lack of fuel and other basic necessities needed for heating and cooking. People are using wood from homes, which, as you can see, have been bombed, especially in Jobar. There are many destroyed homes. In general, Jobar has entirely been destroyed. People use any available wood from doors, window shutters and furniture. Everything is ruined and people go out to gather wood to provide heating for their children and prepare food. People undergo a lot of risk while doing this, under shelling from rockets and from warplanes.”

Wide of smoke rising as a result of bombing

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Living Conditions “Extremely Bad” in ...
Jarabulus
By TTM Contributor 34
13 Feb 2015

Jarabulus, Syria
February 13, 2015

This video offers a rare glimpse of daily life in Jarabulus, an ISIS-controlled Syrian town on the border with Turkey, located around 120 km northwest of Aleppo.
Video contains interviews with two anonymous residents who complained about their economic conditions, saying that basic commodities are unaffordable while there are few employment opportunities.

The footage, which was shot secretly, shows what is believed to be ISIS headquarters destroyed by international coalition-led airstrikes. It also shows local residents in markets and agriculture fields inside and near Jarabulus.

Fighters from the Nusra Front, considered the Syrian branch of al-Qaeda, took over the town in 2013 and later pledged allegiance to ISIS. More than 200,000 Kurds and Arabs in Jarabulus and the surrounding villages have lived under ISIS since early 2014.

The name of the contributor has been withheld for security reasons.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Traveling of fields/ road sign “Jarablus”
Wide of destroyed bridge on river
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of destroyed buildings
Wide of ISIS religious teachings
Traveling of street
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of official printed announcements by ISIS posted outside a building/ close up of seal “The Islamic State, Department of Agriculture, Jarabulus District”
L-R pan of field
Wide of children sliding down a hill
Various of boat rowing in the Euphrates River
Wide of planted vegetables
Wide/ L-R pan of orchard
Various of sheep grazing
Close-up of a person cutting firewood
Various of woman cooking using a stove
Various of a woman milking a cow
Various of oil containers for sale on the roadside
Medium of man at fish market
Various of vegetables for sale at market
Wide of field and sheep herd
Traveling of people in an outdoor market
Various of clothes and shoes for sale
Various of spices for sale
Various of market
Various of crowd at market
Various of food items for sale
Wide/ traveling inside health center

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
09:54 – 12:16

“The situation is not good. I cannot say that we are comfortable. Our situation is very bad. A diesel barrel costs 20,000 [Syrian pounds]. How can we afford it? A gas canister costs 4,000 [Syrian pounds] and a liter of kerosene costs 225 pounds. A pack of bread costs 130 pounds. How can we afford this? I have two young men who are unemployed. Where can they go? “The [Islamic] State is good. They have caught the debauched and the thieves who have hurt people, but they provide electricity and water for only two hours [a day]. For more than a year, people have barely seen electricity. It is provided during two hours but the grid is overloaded and the current is interrupted after half an hour. The bakery was not functioning; they repaired it but bread is expensive. We cannot afford it. I bake bread myself.

“As for warplanes… Our houses have been fractured. These countries have formed a coalition against us. We live in a border town. Bombing goes on night and day.

“They should have bombed the tyrant who has deprived us of everything. He has ruined everything. Whenever our children went out to look for work they were accused of being criminals and caught. All our young men have been put in jail. What can we do? The situation is bad.

“We use firewood. We had olive trees but we cut them down and burned them in the stove to have heat in this cold weather.

“I have a cow. Animal feed is expensive. A kilogram of hay costs 50 pounds. A bale of barely that contains 40 kg costs 2,700 pounds. We need this cow to feed us. All the people who have cattle suffer the same crisis that we do. It is not only me; all of us suffer a bad situation. We wish that we die. There is not a single house that has not been fractured due to warplanes.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
12:17 – 13: 19

“Conditions under the Islamic State are extremely bad. Under the Islamic State, a barrel of diesel costs more than $100. A ton of firewood costs 22,000 [pounds]. This crisis has never been witnessed before.

“Nothing has improved under the Islamic State. Everything has deteriorated. They should create employment for the people. The people work in agricultural lands, which do not provide any revenue. We have abandoned our land. Not all the plots are being cultivated. People have cut down olive groves and used them as firewood. The situation is extremely miserable. There are no services and foreign countries are not providing aid. The Islamic State is in control of the situation. Turkey has closed the border and aid cannot reach people. The situation is very bad under the Islamic State.”

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Besieged Syrians Extract Fuel from Pl...
Eastern Ghouta
By Jawad Arbini
14 Aug 2014

Eastern Ghouta, Damascus, Syria

Syrians in the besieged Damascus suburb of Eastern Ghouta have found an innovative way to turn plastic waste into petrol in light of a fuel shortage in the deprived neighborhood. While this fascinating process produces a desperately needed resource, it is also a very dirty and polluting. Toxic smoke from burning plastic engulfs the little courtyard where the fuel is produced and is leading to respiratory problem amongst the men in charge of the project.

The price of one liter of gasoline in the besieged eastern Ghouta, in rural Damascus, varies between 2500-4000 Syrian Pounds.
The price of one liter of diesel is 2000 Syrian Pounds, which led the civilians to extract fuel from plastic, which caused the price of the liter to decrease to half the price.
The extracting method consists of putting the plastic in sealed barrels through which a water pipe to passes through for cooling purposes. Then a fire is lit underneath the barrels which allows the Methane to be released first, then gasoline, and finally diesel.
There are many types of extracted fuel and the determining factor for the type of fuel released is the type of plastic used.

SHOT LIST:
Various shots show the fuel extracting method.
Shots of the fire lit underneath the barrels, the cooling pipe, and the different types of plastic.
Obtaining diesel and fuel, which are similar in color, in addition to gas, which is not useful at the current time.
General shots of the stands where fuel is sold.

TRANSCRIPT:

Speakers: Abu Hassan, a plant owner
Nabil, owns a shop for selling fuel Abu Yasser, owns a shop for selling fuel

"Here we have the filtration process, we are turning fuel into diesel, and we are turing plastic into gasoline, diesel and oil. We are extracting gas for domestic use. The whole process is about boiling and filtering, from hot to cold. It is a basic procedure."

"One kilogram of plastic can produce 800 grams of liquid, gasoline and diesel."

"Gasoline reached the price of 4000-4200 Syrian Pounds ($20-$21), and the amounts available were minimal. However, we found a substitute by heating plastic and extracting methane, gasoline, and diesel."

"The price of diesel was 3200-3500 Syrian Pounds ($16-$18.50) per liter, which is considered very expensiv. So people were no longer able to purchase it, but after we started operating on plastic and started extracting diesel from it, the price decreased to 1200-1500 SP and it became more available."

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
17 Sep 2013

Motorcycle is loaded with drums of diesel and transported to nearby villages to be sold. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Syrian oil farmers
Ras al Ain, Syria
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
17 Jun 2013

Article about homemade oil refining by farmers in Syria. It goes with the photos you can find under this link: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1279

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Homemade oil refineries (5 of 12)
Ras al Ain, Syria
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
21 Apr 2013

A fire rages under the boiler filled with crude oil. The intense heat vaporizes the oil, after which the vapor can be cooled back down to diesel or petrol.Ras al Ain, Syria, April, 2013. View the full collection here: http://transterramedia.com/collections/1279

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Homemade oil refineries (4 of 12)
Ras al Ain, Syria
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
21 Apr 2013

A farmhand feeds the fire under the oil boiler with distillery waste, producing oppressive smoke that stings the eyes and mouth. Ras al Ain, Syria, April, 2013.

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Homemade oil refineries (8 of 12)
Ras al Ain, Syria
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
21 Apr 2013

A farmhand waits as the produced diesel pours into containers in Ras al Ain, Syria, April, 2013.

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Homemade oil refineries (9 of 12)
Ras al Ain, Syria
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
21 Apr 2013

Once the diesel is made, a farmhand observes it to make sure it's pure. Ras al Ain, Syria, April, 2013.

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Homemade oil refineries (10 of 12)
Ras al Ain, Syria
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
21 Apr 2013

The freshly distilled diesel is poured into a barrel, after which it can be transported to the city and sold into the streets. Ras al Ain, Syria, April, 2013.

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Homemade oil refineries (3 of 12)
Ras al Ain, Syria
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
21 Apr 2013

A worker wears a gas mask while working around the refinery due to the clouds of smoke produced in the process. Ras al Ain, Syria, April, 2013.

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Homemade Oil Refineries in Ras al-Ain
Ras al Ain, Syria
By U.S. Editor
18 Apr 2013

Photos by Jeffry Ruigendijk
For full text by Annabell Van den Berghe, click here: http://transterramedia.com/media/20137

Abu Zechariah and his two sons are farmers in the Kurdish town of Ras al-Ain that are among the many people throughout Syria who have decided to start privately refining crude oil as a way to make money. Trucks come from Ramalan to Ras al-Ain, where they then begin the process. Despite the danger of using rudimentary refinery equipment, for them, the pay-off is worth the risk.

Rival rebel groups and regime forces continue to battle for control of strategic oil and gas fields in the northeast and east of the country. Since the war began, the local demand for oil has increased dramatically because of the disruption in supply to the west, which has led to small, privately-owned refineries being built throughout Syria. Though profitable, this process of refining crude oil is unhealthy and highly volatile, with the chance of an explosion anytime during the process.

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Homemade oil refineries (11 of 12)
Ad darbasiyah, syria
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
18 Apr 2013

Abu Zecharia sells diesel and petrol per liter, and sometimes per half-liter, in Ras al Ain, Syria, April, 2013.

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India Shut Down: Life hit at many pla...
C-58 Noida up
By newspoint
20 Sep 2012

The day-long nationwide shut down called for by the Left parties and NDA on Thursday, demanding a rollback of the government's decision to hike diesel prices, cap subsidised cooking gas cylinders and allow foreign direct investment (FDI) in multi-brand retail, has hit life in many places and businesses in the country.
The Bhartiya Janta Party (BJP) Youth wing’s activists blocked rail traffic, stopping trains.
 Members of Political parties like Samajwadi Party (SP), CPM, CPI, TDP, BJD, JD (S), Trimul Congress (TMC) All India Forward Bloc and the RSP have plans to organise picketing, demonstrations and court arrest.

Byte: Nitin Gatkari , National President of Bhartiya Janta party (BJP)
“Economic decisions taken by the Congress would impact the poor and labourers, and the party would continue to fight them”. Byte: Salman Khurshid , Law Minister of India Visual & Byte Description:
1-Delhi
2-Lucknow (Utter Pradesh)
3-Jaipur (Rajsthan)
4-Hamirpur (Utter Pradesh)
Byte: Nitin Gatkari , National President of Bhartiya Janta party (BJP)
Byte: Salman Khurshid , Law Minister of India

Date-20 Sept 2012
Country : India
Slug: India Shut Down: Life hit at many places, trains stopped, PM's effigy burnt

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
26 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner scoops crude out of collection tank. The oil which has settled on the top of the water will be distilled into diesel when heated in an oil drum and then sold. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil wells in Bojonegoro a regency in East Java. Previously known as a major producer of teak and tobacco, Bojonegoro is now the focus of renewed attention after a new oil field was found in the area. Bojonegoro, Indonesia.

Traditional oil wells in Bojonegoro Indonesia. Bojonegoro is a regency in East Java, Indonesia, about 110 km west of Surabaya. Previously known as a major producer of teak and tobacco, Bojonegoro is the focus of attention in Indonesia as a new oil field has been found in this area. This oil find is the biggest oil discovery in Indonesia in three decades and one of the biggest reserve in Indonesia.

This part of Java has had a long association with oil, and the Dutch, Indonesia's former colonial rulers, operated oil fields in the area although never realized the potential of Cepu. Freelance oil men use rickety wooden frames with pulleys, a few still operated by hand, to retrieve oil in wells up to 400 meters (1,300ft) deep. They then heat the oil on wood fires to burn off water. Miners said they could earn from 200,000 rupiah ($20) a day shared between a team of at least three.

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner gathers crude out of collection tank. The oil which has settled on the top of the water will be distilled into diesel when heated in an oil drum and then sold. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner pours some crude oil into a steal drum as part of the distillation process, creating diesel fuel. Distillation is accomplished by heating the filtered crude oil to between 200 °C (392 °F) and 350 °C (662 °F). Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miners finish off the construction of a new oil derrick made of trees from the surrounding forest. This area in Cepu Indonesia is known as the 'eternal oil field'. Miners frequently set up new oil wells in the area. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miners prepare the pulley system for a new oil derrick this area in Cepu Indonesia is known as the 'eternal oil field'. Miners frequently set up new oil wells in the area. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miners prepare a disused oil derrick for renewed operation. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil wells in Bojonegoro a regency in East Java. Previously known as a major producer of teak and tobacco, Bojonegoro is now the focus of renewed attention after a new oil field was found in the area. Bojonegoro, Indonesia. 25/01/2011.

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner finishes his shift on the oil derrick. Miners use a fork shaped stick to insure the down shaft is correctly positioned when pumping oil. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Oil is pumped from the ground using a truck engine. The body of the truck is discarded and the engine and gearbox are set on the ground. A cable is wound around one of the wheels, which is then attached to the down hole pump. The operator puts the engine in neutral to drop the pump into the hole, and then puts it in reverse to wind up the wheel and pump out the crude oil/water emulsion. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

A traditional oil miner takes a rest as he waits for his processed diesel to be collect for sale in nearby villages. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Distilled diesel oil pours into a tank as miner waits for the sale to a distributor, when it will be sold in nearby villages.

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner pours diesel fuel into drums which will be transported to nearby villages to be sold. Miners said they could earn from 200,000 rupiah ($20) a day shared between a team of at least three. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

A down hole pump releases a wave of crude oil and water onto the ground as part of the process of oil extraction. The miner uses a branch to control the down hole pump as it exits the ground. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner prepares a fresh barrel with which to distil crude oil into diesel. Oil drums are buried in the ground with a pit dug beneath for the fire, creating a kilning effect the refining process can begin, lasting around 6-8 hours. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner prepares a fresh barrel with which to distil crude oil into diesel. Oil drums are buried in the ground with a pit dug beneath for the fire, creating a kilning effect the refining process can begin, lasting around 6-8 hours. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Miners exchange money for the purchase of diesel fuel at one of the oil wells. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner scoops crude out of collection tank. The oil which has settled on the top of the water will be distilled into diesel when heated in an oil drum and then sold. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Oil gathers at the end of a hillside sluice. This crude oil will then be collected and poured into a heated drum as part of the distillation process, creating diesel fuel. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Distilled diesel oil pours in to a tank as it waits for the sale to a distributor. Cepu, Indonesia. 24/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Miners watch on from the hill side as a new oil derrick is constructed. Cepu, Indonesia. 24/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
24 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miners take a rest from work. Previously known as a major producer of teak and tobacco, Bojonegoro is the focus of attention in Indonesia as a new oil field has been found in this area. This oil find is the biggest oil discovery in Indonesia in three decades and one of the biggest reserve in Indonesia. Cepu, Indonesia. 24/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
24 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner watches on as oil is extracted and then sent through a filtration system consisting of small channels dug into the hillside. The crude oil/water emulsion is filtered as it pours into pools and oil drums, and is eventually collected and then heated. The heated crude is distilled into diesel fuel. Cepu, Indonesia. 24/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
24 Jan 2011

Traditional oil wells in Bojonegoro Indonesia. Bojonegoro is a regency in East Java, Indonesia, about 110 km west of Surabaya. Previously known as a major producer of teak and tobacco, Bojonegoro is the focus of attention in Indonesia as a new oil field has been found in this area. This oil find is the biggest oil discovery in Indonesia in three decades and one of the biggest reserve in Indonesia. Cepu, Indonesia. 24/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
24 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner pours some crude oil into a heated drum as part of the distillation process, creating diesel fuel. Oil drums are buried in the ground with a pit dug beneath for the fire, creating a kilning effect. Cepu, Indonesia. 24/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
24 Jan 2011

The range of hills area, surrounded by hardwood tress in Wonocolo village, in the subdistrict of Kedewan , which is the regency of Bojonegoro, East Java , is known as the field of eternal petroleum. When the Dutch left the area, they also left behind hundreds of oil wells. From those hundreds, about fifty of the Dutch-inherited wells are still active. And this region is known as "Blok Wonocolo". Bojonegoro, Indonesia. 24/01/2011.