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Beekeeping From Passion to Profession
Giza
By Silhouette Production House
26 Apr 2016

His passion for beekeeping made Mahmoud Abdul Nasser, 32, the most famous beekeeper in the Egyptian city of Giza.

Unlike the majority of young men of his age, Mahmoud who graduated from high school in Cairo at the age of 17, did not want attend college to continue his education. Instead, he decided to head back to his hometown in Giza, and start a beekeeping business on his father’s farm.

“My story with bees began when I found a beehive on a tree, I put it in a box but the bees flew away.. so I went to a beekeeper and bought three beehives which I used for training. Some of the bees flew away but then I managed to keep the others. I also started to visit experienced beekeepers to watch how they work. I did some free work for them, although they offered me money, but all I wanted is to learn.”

Over 15 years, Mahmoud was able to turn beekeeping from a passion to a profession.

“To me bees are beautiful and enjoyable and I love dealing with them. People get scared of bees because they sting, but it is a beautiful insect and very productive and beneficial to humans.”

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Estella: the Unique Mallorcan Sheepdog
Felanitx, Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
04 Feb 2016

‘Estella’ is a very cinematic and intimate four-minute piece. Estella is a very special sheep dog, a Ca de Bestiar, a breed unique to Mallorca. In this slice of rural life, we see her work with Miquel, a shepherd, as the twilight hour approaches on this Mediterranean island.

*English subtitled version: https://www.transterramedia.com/media/67629

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Estella: the Unique Mallorcan Sheepdo...
Felanitx, Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
04 Feb 2016

‘Estella’ is a very cinematic and intimate four-minute piece. Estella is a very special sheep dog, a Ca de Bestiar, a breed unique to Mallorca. In this slice of rural life, we see her work with Miquel, a shepherd, as the twilight hour approaches on this Mediterranean island.

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Fleeing Nature 3
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
13 Apr 2015

Mohammad Razzaque Miah sleeps inside his temporary tent in Mymensing. He migrated from Kurigram to Mymensing after losing his house in a flood.

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Fleeing Nature: Bangladesh's Climate ...
Dhaka
By Anik Rahman
31 Mar 2015

Sept-Oct, 2014

Bangladesh

Bangladesh is a country of rivers and waterways on which large swaths of its population live. River bank erosion and flooding are common and continuous process due to global warming and rising sea levels. This continuous natural hazard is destroying homes and livelihoods and turning millions of Bangladeshis into homeless climate refugees.

The factors controlling river and stream formation are complex and interrelated. These factors include the amount and rate of water supply from rain and upstream activity, sediment deposited into the stream systems, catchment geology, and the type and extent of vegetation in the catchment. As these factors change over time, river systems respond by altering their shape and course. Unpredictable weather patterns also make flooding a common problem as the course of the rivers shift.

As a result of riverbank erosion and flooding, millions of people are losing their homes and fertile land every year. Most people who lose their homes or land become climate refugees, often pouring into the country’s overpopulated cities penniless and looking for new opportunities.  However, due to overpopulation, migrating climate refugees often arrive in the cities only to find themselves scrounging for food, work and accommodation. Thus, Bangladesh’s most vulnerable citizens are losing their battle against nature and are only made poorer and more desperate.  

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Blind Man Founds School for Visually ...
Yaounde, Cameroon
By Dzekashu Macviban
19 Feb 2015

Life for visually impaired people in Cameroon is a constant battle, given that they are discriminated upon, a phenomenon which condemns some of them to live in solitude and mendicancy. Even though many of them are undocumented and often ignored by society, this doesn’t stop them from being ambitious and entrepreneurial. This is the case with Coco Bertin, who runs CJARC, one of Cameroon’s most solicited rehabilitation centres for the visually impaired. Bertin speaks fondly of his centre, saying “I am morally gratified by the fact that I am able to help other people, so that they can share in my happiness.” 
Upon graduating in 1986, Coco Bertin, who is visually impaired, received a modest financial incentive of CFA 61.500 from the Rehabilitation Institute for the Blind in Buea. Rather than indulge in mendicancy as is the case with so many blind people, he decided to start an organisation that could provide strategic education for the visually impaired. This decision was greatly influenced by the fact that people with disabilities who go to school find it very difficult coping with a system which does not take them into account when drawing the curriculum. 
In order to achieve this, he started working on the furniture for his organisation, which he named COJARY (it was later renamed CJARC [Club des Jeunes Aveugles Réhabilités du Cameroun] in 1988) from his bedroom in his parents’ house, and as well joined forces with Martin Luther, another visually impaired person who graduated from the same school as himself. From Bertin’s parents’ bedroom, the activities moved to the veranda of the Departmental Delegation of Social Affairs in the Essos neighbourhood. 

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Christians Farming on ISIS Frontline
al-Qosh, Iraq
By rsoufi
09 Dec 2014

December 9, 2014
Al-Qosh, Iraq

Last season Amir and Adib Gerges, sibling farmers, were unable to sell their harvest because of an ISIS attack on their homes, in the town of al-Qosh in the largely Christian Nineveh Valley, forced them to flee. Since then, their town has been retaken by the Kurdish Peshmerga and the brothers have returned to work on their farms, despite the fact that ISIS controls territory less than 10km away. The brothers are some of the very few farmers who were brave enough to return to their land. Other farmers either ran away from the conflict or are too scared to return because of the ongoing threat of fighting and land mines laid by retreating ISIS fighters. The brothers heard about the 13-year-old son of a farmer who died after stepping on a mine, in the neighboring town of Tel Isqof. Amir and Adib say that, although their safety is not guaranteed, they have no choice but to stay and work on their ancestral land.

Transcription:

Adib Gerges, Farmer (Man, Arabic)
(00:18-00:27) Interviewer: How much wheat did you plant today?
Adib: “Approximately 40-50 Dunam.”
Interviewer: How many Dunams left to plant?
Adib: “About 20-30 Dunams.”

Amir Gerges, Farmer, (Man, Arabic)
(01:08-01:17) Interviewer: Aren't you afraid?
Amir: “We are counting on God. We are not doing anything wrong.”
(01:22-01:42) Interviewer: You are in an unsafe area, in Nineveh valley. What guarantees do you have that it is safe to keep working on your land? Do you have hope?
Adib: “We are counting on God and God will help us, we hope for things to be resolved.”

(03:24-03:28) Interviewer: What is this?
Adib Gerges: “Seeds for wheat .”

Worker, (Man, Arabic)
(03:38-03:46) Interviewer: Are you not afraid to work here?
Worker: “No why would I be afraid? God is with us and he will help us, why would we be afraid?

(03:57-04:44) Interviewer: How do you feel when ISIS is so close to you?
Adib: “The Peshmerga are here, and we wish for better things to come.”
Interviewer: How much did you harvest?
Adib: “Out of 100 Dunams, we harvested 30.”
Interviewer: What did you do with it?
Adib: “We did not take it to the market yet.”
Interviewer: Why?
Adib: “We did not have time when the conflict happened. We left the area and did not have time to take the wheat to market so it stayed packed in the houses.”

(04:56-05:37) Interviewer: When did you start farming?
Adib: “It is a very old profession, our fathers and grand-fathers worked in cultivation and we are continuing on the same path.”
Interviewer: Do you intended to leave your land?
Adib: “No, our land is very precious, we cannot leave it.”
Interviewer: “Many Christians left their land and went to Europe and many other places.”
Adib: “What can I tell you? Each person does what he pleases.”
Interviewer: What do you think?
Adib: “We hope for the best and that we never have to leave our land.”

(05:57-07:14) Interviewer: Many Christians left the area, but you stayed to guard your land. Why?
Amir: “Yes, the land is very precious, we cannot leave or land. Our country is also precious. This situation will definitely come to an end and the problems will be solved. We work, benefit, and raise our children well. We give them good education and live well. That is what we should do. War and fighting helps nobody.”

(07:32-07:49) Amir: “A person does not abandon his land, his home, and his country. Wherever this person goes, he will find himself a stranger. We cannot leave our land. It is too valuable to us.”

(08:00-08:40) Amir: “The Pershmerga forces are controlling the area. One farmer stepped on a ground-mine, it exploded and he died. He was 13 years old, and had three siblings. It happened about 10-15 days ago.”
Interviewer: Who planted those mines?
Amir Gerges: “Nobody except ISIS.”

(08:50-09:14) Amir: “We have no manure so we bought some from the black market. Concerning gas, we received help from Kurdistan.”

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Fleeing Nature 1
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
19 Nov 2014

A homeless climate refugee sleeps in a park at Dhaka. The Bangladeshi capital is one of the most densely populated cities on earth. One of the major contributing factors to this swell in population is the mass migration of people from the impoverished countryside into the city. Many of those leaving the countryside fled after losing homes, crops, and livelihoods to natural catastrophes.

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Fleeing Nature 6
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Mohammad Rashid Miah cut down all of the trees around his house on Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. Having already lost his house to the river, Mr. Miah is salvaging his trees in order to sell them and save enough money to move to Dhaka.

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Fleeing Nature 8
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Rubel stands in front of his uprooted coconut trees on Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. After loosing his cow to river bank erosion, these coconut trees were his last source of livelihood. However, these trees have now also fallen victim to the river.

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Fleeing Nature 12
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Rabeya Khatun mourns her lost husband and son on Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. Her husband and son lost their lives when their house was swallowed by the river as they slept. Rabeya was at her mother's house when the incident occurred and thus survived.

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Fleeing Nature 13
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
11 Oct 2014

Mohammad Ikram stands in front of the Meghna river, near Alexander Island, in Laxmipur. He has seen his neighbors migrating and even dying because of water related disasters. Despite strong signals that it is best to leave the area, he does not know what to do because his land is all he has.

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Fleeing Nature 2
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
03 Oct 2014

Sadarghat Launch Terminal, situated on the bank of the river Buriganga in Dhaka, is one of the busiest places in Bangladesh. Most people migrating from the countryside pass through this port to migrate to Dhaka. Many of those migrating are climate refugees.

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Fleeing Nature 4
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Shahjahan transports tin sheets and other materials from his house. Some families actually migrate before disaster strikes so they do not lose all of their belongings in an impending disaster. Mohammad deconstructed his entire house and moved it elsewhere before it was destroyed by the water.

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Fleeing Nature 5
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Mamun stands over his submerged house in the Padma River in Dohar, Dhaka. Mr. Mamun's house was swallowed by the Padma after river bank erosion resulted in a land implosion.

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Fleeing Nature 7
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Romjal Ali takes a selfie with his destroyed house. Mr. Ali's house was destroyed by the eroding river bank. Dohar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

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Fleeing Nature 9
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Rabeya Begum stands over the roof of her house which she salvaged after it was destroyed by river bank erosion. She is going to use the salvaged materials to build her new home. Dohar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

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Fleeing Nature 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Khadija Akhter was only able to save this cabinet and some bricks from her house after river bank erosion resulted in her house being destroyed and submerged. Dohar, Dhaka.

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Fleeing Nature 11
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Anik Rahman
04 Sep 2014

Mohammad Hashmot Ali's house sits tilted and half submerged in the Padma river after the bank on which his house was built gave way. Dohar, Dhaka, Bangladesh.

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Aquaponics in Egypt
Cairo, Egypt
By Leyland Cecco
23 Jun 2013

Faris Farrag, the founder of the farm 'Bustan', believes that aquaponics will play an increasingly larger role in Egyptian farming as water resources become scarce.

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Horse Farm,Italy (8 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

A racehorse after training in the horse-farm in San Rossore park,Pisa,Italy

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Horse Farm,Italy (7 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

Racehorses after training in the horse farm,San Rossore park,Pisa,Italy

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Horse Farm,Italy (6 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

After training,taking everything off of the horse before "after training" routine which include cleaning and walking around the farm.
San Rossore park,Pisa,Italy

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Horse Farm,Italy (5 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

After training,before "after training" routine which includes cleaning and walking around the farm.
San Rossore park,Pisa,Italy

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Horse Farm,Italy (4 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

After training,walking around with the horse as part of "after training" routine.
San Rossore park,Pisa,Italy

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Horse Farm,Italy (3 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

After training,walking around with the horse as part of "after training"routine.
San Rossore park,Pisa,Italy

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Horse Farm,Italy (2 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

The trainer stands next to the horse just came back from training.
San Rossore park,Pisa,Italy

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Horse Farm,Italy (1 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

After training,cleaning the horse in the farm,
San Rossore park,Pisa,Italy

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Horse Farm,Italy (13 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

Racehorses training in San Rossore park,Pisa,Italy

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Horse Farm,Italy (12 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

Racehorses training in San Rossore park,Pisa,Italy

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Horse Farm,Italy (11 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

Racehorses training in San Rossore park,Pisa,Italy

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Horse Farm,Italy (10 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
11 Apr 2013

Racehorses training in San Rossore park,Pisa,Italy

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Horse Farm in Italy
Pisa, Italy
By Mais Istanbuli
11 Apr 2013

The Park of San Rossore, a royal farmstead that became a presidential mansion, is also the site where in 1938, the Italian king formerly signed the introduction of the racial law. Today, San Rossore is most famous for its hippodrome. The racetrack and training spaces are managed by the Alfea society.

In the studs of Pisa there are around 600 horses, and the total cost of keeping each of them is €20.000. There are around 100 hectares of tracks available to ride, and the hippodrome organizes around 50 official sports days per year. Thousands attend the races, and around €600.000 is gambled each race day. Eight hundred people work in the horse racing industry in Pisa, 50 000 at national level.

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Horse Farm,Italy (17 of 17)
Pisa, Italy
By Nili Bassan
05 Apr 2013

Horse race in San Rossore park,Italy.
A rider caresses his horse head just before the race begins.

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Farm to Fork (Part 1 of 3)
Kathmandu, Nepal
By PIKTO VIDEO
14 Mar 2013

It is strange to observe that despite the sacred statute of food in Nepal, it is paradoxically the origin of many diseases sometimes leading to death. We know that millions of people don’t have enough to eat, and that some of them even face severe conditions of malnutrition. Of all facts, food security remains a major problem in Nepal. But what we know less is that 50% of the diseases come from a misuse of food and water. This alarming figure is more than ever a topical issue. In order to find answers and solutions, we investigated the backstage of food, from where it is produced – the farm – to our final consumption – the fork!

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Farm to fork part 3/3
kathmandu, Nepal
By PIKTO VIDEO
14 Mar 2013

It is strange to observe that despite the sacred statute of food in Nepal, it is paradoxically the origin of many diseases sometimes leading to death. We know that millions of people don’t have enough to eat, and that some of them even face severe conditions of malnutrition. Of all facts, food security remains a major problem in Nepal. But what we know less is that 50% of the diseases come from a misuse of food and water. This alarming figure is more than ever a topical issue. In order to find answers and solutions, we investigated the backstage of food, from where it is produced – the farm – to our final consumption – the fork!