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Dear America 1: Setting the Scene
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

Thousands of Syrians await safety in border camps inside Syria as Syria’s neighbors struggle to absorb nearly 2 million refugees. (http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php)

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Dear America 3: Big Sis
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

“I study English so I can be a translator and come to see the skyscrapers!” says 12-year-old Rajaa from Aleppo. She’s the oldest of 4 children, all currently living in the camp to escape from the violence of Aleppo.

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Dear America 4: Setting the Scene
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

Thousands of Syrians are trapped in internally displaced camps throughout the countryside and along the border. In this camp along the Turkish border, several thousands of Syrians await entry into Turkey as the Turkish government struggles to absorb more than 200,000 refugees. (http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php)

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Dear America 5: Hard Winter
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

The winter hit Syrian refugees harder than ever this year. Heavy rains flooded Syrian IDPs in their own sewage, and the lack of electricity and their tent homes combined to make a harrowing winter. Syrians began cutting down what was once groves of trees from neighboring property in hopes of burning a little wood for heat.

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Dear America 6: Cheese!
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

“Cheese!” they scream in English as the camera clicks. Hassan and his little sister miss their school in Aleppo. Although they go to the makeshift schools in tents with volunteer teachers in the camps, they say it’s not the same. “I’m good at science so my father says I will be a doctor some day. Then I will come help sick people in America,” says Hassan.

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Dear America 7: School Interrupted
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

Lina started school this year but had to leave when the Assad regime started targeting schools in a neighboring town. Her parents were scared her school could be next, and, when shelling started in their town of Tarafat, their family fled to the border where they’ve been awaiting refugee status for four months. Her parents say they try to keep in touch with their friends from Tarafat but everyone is scattered between border camps, refugee camps, and cheap rentals in Turkey.
“I miss my friends, I miss Hima [a friend], I miss my teacher, and I miss my school,” says the six-year-old.

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Dear America 8: Rebel in Training
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

Two of Nasser’s older brothers are fighting with rebel-forces in Aleppo. He brags that they have killed Assad’s snipers but says that he misses playing soccer with them and that his mother cries because she is scared for them. “When will the US help us Free Syria?” he asks.

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Dear America 16: Exporting Disney
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

Kareen asks if I know Hannah Montana. She even knows a song from the television show that she sings for us. “Will you please tell Hannah Montana to come to see us in Syria?” she squeals. Kareen’s family has been waiting six months to get to safety according to her parents. They’re worried that she will soon hit puberty because some Syrian girls have been kidnapped into sex slavery since the conflict began.

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Dear America 17: Soccer vs. Football
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

These little boys play soccer in these groves when they’re not trying to sell candy bars in the camps. Because of the harsh conditions of the camp, Syrians began cutting the nearby groves for firewood last winter. These boys say they want to come to America some day, and they ask why we call it “soccer” instead of “football” like everyone else in the world.

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Dear America 18: Hard Winter
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

The winter hit Syrian refugees harder than ever this year. Heavy rains flooded Syrian IDPs in their own sewage, and the lack of electricity and their tent homes combined to make a harrowing winter. Syrians began cutting down what was once groves of trees from neighboring property in hopes of burning a little wood for heat.

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Dear America 19: We Love You
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

These little cuties practiced their English that they learned in school. Haitam, the boy furthest to the right, wants to be a dentist so he says he is not eating candy these days. Together, these children sing the ABCs and yell “We love you!” until we’re out of earshot. According to UNICEF, one in every five school has been destroyed, damaged or converted into shelters for Syrians in danger. (http://www.unicefusa.org/assets/pdf/Syria-2-year-report.pdf)

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Dear America 20: U-S-A! U-S-A!
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

A group of young Syrian children begin chanting “U-S-A! U-S-A!” in a makeshift IDP camp -- a scene they saw in American movies.

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Dear America 11: We Love You!
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

Amina’s message to America: “WE LOVE YOU!” before she gives an enormous bear hug for a little girl.

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Dear America 21: Setting the Scene
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Jul 2013

A child stands firm in front of his family’s tent, staring across the sewage lake on his back doorstep.

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Dear America 9: Setting the Scene
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
02 Apr 2013

Thousands of Syrians await safety in border camps inside Syria as Syria’s neighbors struggle to absorb nearly 2 million refugees. Families struggle to grasp onto moments of normalcy, sanity, and dignity through their organizing despite the unspeakable conditions of their makeshift border camps. (http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php)

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Dear America 10: Sewage Canyons
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Apr 2013

The winter of 2012 was rough for the millions of displaced Syrians throughout the region. In this particular camp, thousands of Syrians trapped along the border awaiting refugee status in Turkey were flooded in their own filth by the heavy winter rains. Community organizers dug a ditch that has now become a little canyon to drain the sewage from the camp. The open river of waste weaves through the thousands of tents along the border.

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Dear America 14: Rivers of Sewage
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Apr 2013
Children wander the “sewage canyon” in a makeshift camp along the border with Turkey. According to the UN, children make up more than half of the Syrian refugees and IDPs. (http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php)
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Dear America 12: Man of the House
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Apr 2013

Mohammed, age 13, is now the man of the house. His father and brothers were killed when they were working at their family’s garage. His mother and his other brothers and sisters fled with his uncle’s family to this makeshift border camp when the violence started in Aleppo last summer. To Americans, he says “We welcome you to Free Syria, and we hope our country to be like yours some day.”

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Dear America 13: The Skeptic
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Apr 2013

“If the USA is so strong, why can’t they help us?” asks this 14-year-old Syrian boy. Of the nearly two million Syrian refugees, over half are children.

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Dear America 15: Rivers of Sewage
Azzaz, Syria
By AnnaThereseDay
01 Apr 2013
Children wander the “sewage canyon” in a makeshift camp along the border with Turkey. According to the UN, children make up more than half of the Syrian refugees and IDPs. (http://data.unhcr.org/syrianrefugees/regional.php)
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Children, victims of Syria's war (12 ...
Azaz, Syria
By Ryan Heughn Jacobs
16 Mar 2013

A boy walks through what once was the market in Azaz, Syria. With 35% of Syria's population under the age of 14, what happens to them now will determine Syria's future.

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Children, victims of Syria's war (10 ...
Azaz, Syria
By Ryan Heughn Jacobs
14 Mar 2013

A young girl is accompanied by her mother in Bab al Salam refugee camp, Azaz. With 35% of Syria's population under the age of 14, what happens to them now will determine Syria's future.

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Children, victims of Syria's war (7 o...
Azaz, Syria
By Ryan Heughn Jacobs
14 Mar 2013

A Syrian boy walks between tents in the dank smoke filled wharehouse section of Azaz refugee camp on his way to collect water for his family. With 35% of Syria's population under the age of 14, what happens to them now will determine Syria's future.

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Children, victims of Syria's war (4 o...
Azaz, Syria
By Ryan Heughn Jacobs
14 Mar 2013

A young girl in Azaz refugee camp poses infront of her father(L) who lost his leg last year when a rocket hit their home in Aleppo. With 35% of Syria's population under the age of 14, what happens to them now will determine Syria's future.

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SYRIA - THE FORGOTTEN OF CAMP AZAZ
Azaz, Syria
By Mais Istanbuli
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Syria - the forgotten of camp Azaz (P...
Azaz, Syria
By Michele Pero
06 Dec 2012

Refugee camp of Azaz, Syrian border. Refugees from Halep and surroundings have lost their houses under bombings. They left Halep with just the clothes they had at that time. They have no documents, no money, no belongings anymore. They believed in passing the Turkish border to escape the massacres, but after a limited number of refugees which have been accepted by the Turkish government, and settled to the nearby camp of Kilis, right after the Turkish border, the border was closed. They had to settle in the camp right on the Syrian border, waiting for a move that does not arrive. Turkey cannot take more refugees and cannot do more than what actually it does. They must stay were they are, with no home to Syria anymore, no passport to leave the country, almost convicted to stay in the camp.
The exceeding refugees not accepted to Turkey were settled on September 2012 under the big hangars once used by Syrian custom police for to store and check up goods before to let them pass the border. For months the refugees had to sleep right on the pavements, under hangars, under trucks or any other shelter available. No heating, no running water, no latrines, no roof above their heads.
Tents arrived just at around the mid of November 2012, donated by the Red Crescent of Qatar. Since that, three hangars were filled with tents, then other tents were necessarily set on open ground. At December 2012, refugees of the Azaz camp are about 7000.
Life at the camp is hard. Volunteers from various ONG such as IHH provide for meals every day. Supplies come from world wide reliefs and volunteer donations, but they are not enough to many. Tents are not wet proof. Pavements are wet all the times the rain falls, especially those ones settled on open ground. No electricity is supplied. Little water is brought into big containers for first needs. Heating becomes a real issue with the incoming winter. Kids and boys are sent in the around fields to gather any burning material, but they cannot get too far since the mine fields for to protect the no man’s land are right at border line with the camp. Refugees burn dry grass or just a little more than grass. At dusk, they must make return to their tents, because all around there is no light for to walk even. They rest at candle light in their tents until they fall asleep.
Recently a protest for to ask better conditions at the camp was held at the border (see other reportage “Syria - protest in the camp of Azaz”, © Michele Pero) for to interest the Turkish Governor of the area, with no result. These people must stay here. No place where to go, no place where to make return. Convicted to be forgotten. Up to how long, no one knows.

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Destroyed Syrian Government Tank
Azaz, Syria
By pathilsman
30 Nov 2012

A government tank lies destroyed in Azaz Syria.

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The remains of a shelled school in Az...
Azaz, Syria,
By Ms_R
14 Sep 2012

Azaz has seen brutal fighting in order to secure the northernmost crossing with Turkey. The remnants of fighting and the subsequent shelling, that saw 50 dead, are seen throughout the town, in burnt-out tanks and piles of rubble.

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A man stands inside his destroyed fac...
Azaz, Syria,
By Ms_R
14 Sep 2012

Azaz has seen brutal fighting in order to secure the northernmost crossing with Turkey. The remnants of fighting and the subsequent shelling, that saw 50 dead, are seen throughout the town, in burnt-out tanks and piles of rubble. Here, a local businessman, who owns an olive-oil pressing factory, stands amid the rubble. Rebuilding of the factory has begun, even as he fears that they will be shelled once more.

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A door to a factory in Azaz filled wi...
Azaz, Syria,
By Ms_R
14 Sep 2012

Azaz has seen brutal fighting in order to secure the northernmost crossing with Turkey. The remnants of fighting and the subsequent shelling, that saw 50 dead, are seen throughout the town, in burnt-out tanks and piles of rubble. The residents fear further shelling, even as they live among daily reminders of the battle to free the town from Bashar Al-Assad's forces.

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A child from Azaz silhouetted by bull...
Azaz, Syria,
By Ms_R
14 Sep 2012

Azaz has seen brutal fighting in order to secure the northernmost crossing with Turkey. The remnants of fighting and the subsequent shelling, that saw 50 dead, are seen throughout the town, in burnt-out tanks and piles of rubble.

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A man stands inside his destroyed fac...
Azaz, Syria,
By Ms_R
14 Sep 2012

Azaz has seen brutal fighting in order to secure the northernmost crossing with Turkey. The remnants of fighting and the subsequent shelling, that saw 50 dead, are seen throughout the town, in burnt-out tanks and piles of rubble. Here a local businessman who owns an olive-oil pressing factors displays the damage done to his business after it was shelled and used as a sniper base for Syrian regime soldiers.

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Refugees living in a transit camp nex...
Azaz, Syria
By Ms_R
14 Sep 2012

It's estimated that around 10,000 (some estimates touch as high as 17,000) refugees are currently trapped on the Syrian border, waiting to get into Turkey. Many refugees have been waiting there for up to three weeks, in squalid conditions.

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Children run through a burnt-out scho...
Azaz, Syria,
By Ms_R
14 Sep 2012

Azaz has seen brutal fighting in order to secure the northernmost crossing with Turkey. The remnants of fighting and the subsequent shelling, that saw 50 dead, are seen throughout the town, in burnt-out tanks and piles of rubble.