Frame 0004
Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
20 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war. The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters. Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo. In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon. The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

Frame 0004
Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas
Sanaa
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015

Sana'a, Yemen
 
The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.
 

Frame 0004
Roving Barefoot for Propane Gas (roug...
Sana'a, Yemen
By Yousef Mawry
18 Feb 2015

February 17, 2015
Sana'a, Yemen

The Yemeni population is once again faced with a severe shortage of propane gas. This has caused much grief among poverty stricken Yemeni families who make up the majority of the Yemeni population. Fifteen-year-old Bashir Merhibi is the eldest son in a Yemeni family. Bashir struggles on a daily basis to find propane gas to cook food. Instead of going to school in the morning, Bashir is forced to search the streets barefoot for propane gas in a number of neighborhoods in the Yemeni capital. A Transterra contributor spent the day with Bashir Merhibi as he searched for propane tanks. He would roll his 40-pound empty tank along the road with his feet through many neighborhoods hoping to take a full tank home to his family so they can cook their food. Unfortunately Bashir was unable to obtain any propane gas as the price had increased to 1,900 Yemeni Rial (almost $9), and he only had 1,200 Rial. The severe gas shortage in Yemen is due to disgruntled tribesmen who occasionally blow up gas pipelines and block supply routes in the province of Ma'rib to pressure the Yemeni government to meet their demands. The shortage of gas in Yemen has resulted in a price hike of propane gas, which many Yemeni families cannot afford.

Transcription

Sound bite, Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"My name is Bashir, I am 15 years old and I am in the ninth grade. Instead of going to school, I wake up and go searching for propane gas with this tank, and this tank has been through all kinds of streets. From street to street and from station to station, I have kicked and pushed this tank with my hands and with my feet".

"I have been searching for gas since seven in the morning; I haven’t eaten breakfast or lunch. I drank water and ate a biscuit from the store and that’s it and continue to search and search for gas in a number of streets and propane gas stations. In this country, you have to search for everything. Nothing comes without struggle. Just like this: this is an example of Yemen. They give you gas like this: drip-by-drip".

"I started my search at seven in the morning and the time now is five pm. After searching for gas in many streets and many stations, I finally found one. I thought I was going to pump gas, so I waited in line until I reached the front."

"I asked the owner how much? And, he replied, ‘1900’ (Yemeni Riyal.) I then told him, “Fear god! The original price is 1200 (Yemeni Riyal) and you want to sell it for 1900?” I tried to plead with him and told him I only have 1200; however, he told me to either pay 1900 or go home. We argued and argued and almost got into a fight. I took my tank and told him all I have with me is 1200."

Sound bite, Kamal Ali Ahamed - Propane Gas Store Owner, (Man, Arabic)
“The cause of gas shortage is due to the low gas production from Safer. The Safer Gas Company fills 39 propane trucks every day; however, there are 1200 propane trucks queuing in line at Safer Company waiting to fill their gas trucks so they can distribute gas throughout the nation. This has led to fewer propane truck deliveries to the Yemeni capital. Because of this, only 150 to 200 propane trucks make deliveries per week. This has led to higher demands for gas in the Yemeni capital, while there are fewer gas deliveries."

"The second reason is there are now more cars which run on propane gas. In 2014, nearly 67 thousand cars that run on gas entered the county. This resulted in a higher demands for gas; however, the gas production in Safer (Mareb province) is only sufficient enough for the use of average households only."

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic)
"No car, no motorbike and no bicycle. I am just like all other Yemenis, I have to kick and push, kick and push from street to street and from gas station to gas station Sometimes, I find a station with propane gas however, there are long lines which reach up to 500 to 600 tanks. When I reach the station, people usually try to cut in line in front of me, which results in heated arguments and sometimes fights. I don’t know what else to do. This is very depressing. The gas problem in Yemen is very depressing."

Sound bite: Abdurahman al-Yemani - Citizen, (Man, Arabic)
“We want a solution to the gas problem; we been waiting in line since the morning. All of us have haven’t ate lunch. The rich people are living comfortably because they have gas; however, we the average workers have to spend all day waiting in line. Will they ever have mercy on us, or are we going to continue living like this?"

Sound bite: Bashir Merhibi, (Man, Arabic) "Unfortunately, I am now going home and I don’t know how to tell my mother and father that I couldn’t find gas. What will I tell them, what shall I do?"

Frame 0004
Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
18 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war.

The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters.

Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo.

In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon.
The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Teenage Fighter
09:17 – 12:19
Why do you not speak Norwegian?
I do not know how to.
Why?
I came to Iraq a long time ago and I cannot speak [Norwegian].
Did you not learn Norwegian at school?
I was young. When I came from Norway I was young. I had not gone to school.
How old were you?
About four years old.
Do you wish to return?
Yes.
Why? Why do you want to return?
The country there is better and safer.
What are you doing in Iraq?
I study at the hawza [Shiite religious school].
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
In Iraq there are holy shrines which I visited. My father came here to practice jihad. He went to Jarf al-Sakhr. I am proud of him for practicing jihad. I went with him after they liberated the area. I wore his military vest and went with him.
That was after the liberation?
Yes, after the liberation was over.
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
I am proud of him. I am proud of my father and his position as an Iraqi military.
Do you feel scared sometimes?
No.
Do you feel scared that ISIS is killing people in Iraq?
No. I do not feel scared.
You do not feel scared?
No.
Are you scared of getting killed?
No, I am not.
Why not?
There is nothing to worry about here.
Did you participate in any major battle?
No. I used to go with my father to [the battlefield] after the battle was over.
Do you not think that you are too young [to be part of an armed group]?
No.
I have not fought. I used to go to a certain area after the liberation was over.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
No.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway to and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
I did not come to Iraq to fight. I came to study and be with my people and near the holy shrines.
Is there anything that you miss in Norway? Do you miss any people? Do you have certain good memories? Do you miss any friends or neighbors?
I miss them sometimes but we came to Iraq for the sake of the Imams and to study.

Frame 0004
Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
18 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war.

The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters.

Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo.

In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon.
The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abbas al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander:

Abbas al-Asadi: “I will be heading to Samaraa, after this interview a car will come and pick us up and we will go there.

Interviewer: Did you just return from Samaraa for this interview?

Abbas: “No, I came to see my family but they [Army commanders] called me and told me to return. I am now in the army fighting ISIS but I need to return. They need me there. I took a few days off and went there, but now they need me, they called me and I have to return.”

Interviewer: Don't you think you are breaking the Norwegian law, or technically the law in all of Europe, by letting your children participate in war?

Abbas: “I will not break the Norwegian law or the Arabic law. My children came with me after the area was liberated, after the area became safe and the families returned to it. But my little child likes to wear my uniform and I taught him how to shoot just so he can have some experience. But he does not participate in war with me. I know he cannot participate in war, war is not for him.”

Interviewer: The last time we met with them, your children told us that they participated in war and in victories and in fighting ISIS. What is the reason for such statements?

Abbas: “He considers himself to be one with his father, and since his father participated and he entered Jurf al-Sakher after it was liberated, he considered himself as a participant. Of course he did not participate in the battles in Jurf al-Sakher, do you think I would want death for my son? It is impossible.”

Interviewer: When was the last time you went to Norway?

Abbas: “I was there last in 2008.”

Interviewer: Do you intend to return to Norway and if so, when?

Abbas: “Yes I intend to return to Norway, after the war with ISIS ends.”

Interviewer: How many are in your family?

Abbas: “Some of them are living in Oslo, and I have another son who is a doctor in America. According to our beliefs, a person who leaves jihad is an infidel. We ask God to help us and support us.”

Interviewer: Is your wife pleased with what you are doing?

Abbas: “Yes my wife is proud of me because I am fighting with the good people against the enemies.”
Interviewer: What do you want to tell the Norwegian government and the European Union who might think that you brought your son to participate in war?
Abbas: “I did not and will not involve my son in war, I repeat that, I did not and will not involve any of my youngest children in war. They go to school.. just like in anywhere else. When we liberated the area, many people and journalists came and my son was one of those people. He wanted to wear my uniform, and I allowed him to. It has nothing to do with war. We fought him the Arabic traditions, such as shooting, horseback riding, and other simple things. If a war happens in Norway, God forbid, I am willing to fight alongside them. If Norway or Europe needs me to fight, I will definitely help them. Norway is my country and Iraq is my country.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Teenage Fighter
09:17 – 12:19
Why do you not speak Norwegian?
I do not know how to.
Why?
I came to Iraq a long time ago and I cannot speak [Norwegian].
Did you not learn Norwegian at school?
I was young. When I came from Norway I was young. I had not gone to school.
How old were you?
About four years old.
Do you wish to return?
Yes.
Why? Why do you want to return?
The country there is better and safer.
What are you doing in Iraq?
I study at the hawza [Shiite religious school].
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
In Iraq there are holy shrines which I visited. My father came here to practice jihad. He went to Jarf al-Sakhr. I am proud of him for practicing jihad. I went with him after they liberated the area. I wore his military vest and went with him.
That was after the liberation?
Yes, after the liberation was over.
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
I am proud of him. I am proud of my father and his position as an Iraqi military.
Do you feel scared sometimes?
No.
Do you feel scared that ISIS is killing people in Iraq?
No. I do not feel scared.
You do not feel scared?
No.
Are you scared of getting killed?
No, I am not.
Why not?
There is nothing to worry about here.
Did you participate in any major battle?
No. I used to go with my father to [the battlefield] after the battle was over.
Do you not think that you are too young [to be part of an armed group]?
No.
I have not fought. I used to go to a certain area after the liberation was over.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
No.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway to and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
I did not come to Iraq to fight. I came to study and be with my people and near the holy shrines.
Is there anything that you miss in Norway? Do you miss any people? Do you have certain good memories? Do you miss any friends or neighbors?
I miss them sometimes but we came to Iraq for the sake of the Imams and to study.

Frame 0004
Mohammad, a Syrian Teenager Who "Chos...
Morek, Hama
By TTM Contributor 9
30 Jan 2015

Morek, Hama, Syria

January 30, 2015

Fourteen-year-old Mohammad Khodr al-Hajji left school more than a year ago to fight against the forces of President Bashar al-Assad. Mohammad joined the opposition battalion formed by his father. He receives regular military training and has been positioned on the frontline outside the town of Morek near Hama, in an area called al-Sayyad. Opposition fighters took this area from the Syrian government’s forces fourth months ago. In a year or two, Mohammad hopes to actively engage in battles.

Mohammad’s case is not unique. Many children have been drawn into the Syrian conflict as it nears its fourth year. According to a Human Rights Watch report, non-state militias of different affiliations have recruited dozens of teenagers and given them perilous military tasks.

Khodr, Mohammad's father, says that even though his son is young, he might not be safer at home because he could die in an airstrike.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of fighters resting inside a cave
Close-up of Mohammad al-Hajji’s face
Close-up of Mohammad al-Hajji’s hand and Kalashnikov rifle
Wide of Mohammad al-Hajji walking ,carrying a Kalashnikov rifle

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Mohammad Khodr al-Hajji, Syrian Child Fighter
00:11 – 00:24

“I am Mohammad, the son of Khodr. I was at school and I was watching TV. I saw destruction and children. I went for the quest of freedom, against Assad’s infidel regime.” Wide of Mohammad walking with other fighters.
Wide of Mohammad with other fighters in a trench shooting.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Mohammad Khodr al-Hajji, Syrian Child Fighter

00:33 – 00:48
“I have been here for a short while, but my father taught me how to use weapons and to shoot, thanks be to God. I was with my friends and I saw that they all participated in Jihad, and I wanted to be like them.
I have not been in school for many years. I was in the eighth grade. I stopped going to school.
There was an air raid. A warplane hit the school and we stopped going there.
When I first grabbed the rifle I felt something very great.
There is no work. People have stopped working. We want to work but there is nothing to do.
I kept participating in the revolution. I will keep resisting until I die.
I am still young and I am learning. In a year or two, I will start participating in battles, God willing.”

Close-up of Mohammad cleaning rifle.
Wide of Mohammad in trench with other fighters.
Various of Khodr al-Hajji, Mohammad’s father , talking on walkie-talkie Medium of Khodr al-Hajji inside cave with other fighters

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Khodr al-Hajji, Mohammad’s Father, Head of opposition armed group

01:33 – 01:59
"He [Mohammad] saw that his brother and I were involved [in the revolution]. He began to insist to accompany me, so I took him with me. His brother and I trained him to use a rifle. I showed him how to disassemble and reassemble the rifle. Then he wanted to shoot, so I showed how.
We shall carry on, God willing. Someone younger might also participate [in the fighting]. If this continues for longer, God willing, the younger people will participate.”

Wide of Mohammad opening a box of dates with a knife

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Khodr al-Hajji, Mohammad’s Father, Head of opposition armed group

02:08 – 02:28
“I do not care about education because we are losing so much blood. If he is martyred, it will be for God’s sake. He would be lucky. God giveth, God taketh. My son Mohammad or his brothers might be at home and suffer a strike by warplanes, which are dropping explosive barrels. If his days are over, he will die at home.”

Various of Mohammad and other fighters praying behind Khodr al-Hajji.
Various of Mohammad and other fighters walking

Thumb sm
Mook, the Teen Thai Weightlifter
Bangkok
By Biel Calderon
17 May 2013

Mook, 17, never fathomed any other way of life, an existence outside the rice fields and subsistence farming. Having lost her mother at the age of 9, she moved to Surin, one of the poorest provinces in Thailand, to live with her father's family. From then on, she was made to work in the fields, clean the house and look after her younger cousins. At 12, a friend of the family noticed her strong build and suggested she earn her way by weightlifting - which is just what she did. Before long, she had secured a scholarship from the National Youth Team in Bangkok and began a new life. Now she receives a small salary and has a safe place to stay while she pursues her high school studies. Many children and young people from poor families in Thailand are sent to this kind of program where they get a chance to study and earn a little discretionary income. Most of them choose traditional boxing, Muay Thai, but as several female Thai athletes have begun winning Olympic weightlifting medals, the sport has become more popular.

Thumb sm
Mook, the Teen Thai Weightlifter (1 o...
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
01 May 2013

Mook getting ready for training at the Thai-Japanese Stadium. She has to use gym chalk to grab the weightlifting bars properly.

Thumb sm
Mook, the Teen Thai Weightlifter (2 o...
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
01 May 2013

Mook getting ready for training at the Thai-Japanese Stadium. She trains at least five days per week.

Thumb sm
Mook, the Teen Thai Weightlifter (3 o...
Bangkok, Thailand.
By Biel Calderon
01 May 2013

Siptiporng Minchaleung (a.k.a. San), 65 years old, Mook's coach, with some male weightlifters at the Thai-Japanese Stadium. He trains a total of 9 weightlifters (both males and females).

Thumb sm
Mook, the Teen Thai Weightlifter (4 o...
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
01 May 2013

Mook getting ready for training at the Thai-Japanese Stadium. She trains at least five days per week.

Thumb sm
Mook, the Teen Thai Weightlifter (5 o...
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
01 May 2013

Mook trains at the Thai-Japanese Stadium. She trains at least five days per week. She is able to lift 85 Kg (clean and jerk competition) and 67 Kg (snatch competition).

Thumb sm
Mook, the Teen Thai Weightlifter (6 o...
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
01 May 2013

Mukda Rueandsuksud, 17 years old, also known as Mook, getting ready for training at the Thai-Japanese Stadium. She trains at least five days per week.

Thumb sm
Mook, the Teen Thai Weightlifter (7 o...
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
01 May 2013

Siwanan Yodyang, 15 years old, (a.k.a Joy) and Siriporn Samrandee, 20 years old, (a.k.a. Jane) are Mook's colleagues and best friends. They all train at the Thai-Japanese Stadium.

Thumb sm
Mook, the Teen Thai Weightlifter (8 o...
Bangkok, Thailand.
By Biel Calderon
01 May 2013

Siptiporng Minchaleung (a.k.a. San), 65 years old, Mook's coach at the Thai-Japanese Stadium. He trains a total of 9 weightlifters (both males and females).

Frame 0004
Mook, The Teenage Thai Weightlifter
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
03 Mar 2013

Mook, 17, never imagined she could have a different life, away from ricefields and farming. Having lost her mother at the age of 9, she moved to Surin, one of the poorest provinces in Thailand, to live with her father’s family. She was then obliged to work in the fields, clean the house and look after her younger cousins. At 12, a friend of the family saw her strong body and suggested her to earn her life with weightlifting. She got a scholarship for the National Youth Team in Bangkok and started a new life. Now she gets a small salary and has a safe place to stay while she pursues her studies in high school.

Many children and youth from poor families in Thailand are sent to this kind of programmes to get a chance to study and earn some money. Most of them choose the traditional boxing, Muay Thai, but weightlifting is becoming more popular as some Thai female athletes have recently won some Olympic medals.

Thumb sm
Morrocco on two wheels (17 of 25)
Essaouira, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
02 Mar 2013

Cycling can be the best and fastest means of transport, both in the countryside and in the city.

Thumb sm
Protesters demand accountability for ...
Nogales, Sonora
By ST McNeil
02 Nov 2012

Protesters marched to the port of entry to demand justice for the slaying of a 16-year-old by US Border Patrol (Nov. 2, 2012, Nogales, Sonora).

Thumb sm
Families of slain teens join in prote...
Nogales, Sonora
By ST McNeil
02 Nov 2012

Protesters marched to the port of entry to demand justice for the slaying of a 16-year-old by US Border Patrol (Nov. 2, 2012, Nogales, Sonora).

Thumb sm
Single Mom in London 10
london, uk
By Lihee Avidan
18 May 2008

Linda (8) lives in a dilapidated council flat in South London with her brother Hassan (5) and their mum, Kelly (23). Britain has the highest teenage pregnancy rate in Western Europe - Kelly got pregnant when she turned 15 and left school.

Thumb sm
Single Mom in London 16
london, uk
By Lihee Avidan
01 Dec 2007

Kelly (23) is a single mom and lives with her 2 children Hassan (5), and Linda (7), on Lawson estate, South London. She fell pregnant when she turned 15 and left school. Britain has the highest teenage pregnancy rate in Western Europe.

Thumb sm
Single Mom in London 12
london, uk
By Lihee Avidan
01 Dec 2007

Hassan (5) lives in a dilapidated council flat in South London with his sister Linda (8) and their mum, Kelly (23). Britain has the highest teenage pregnancy rate in Western Europe - Kelly got pregnant when she turned 15 and left school.

Thumb sm
Single Mom in London 15
london, uk
By Lihee Avidan
01 Dec 2007

Linda (8) lives in a dilapidated council flat in South London with her brother Hassan (5) and their mum, Kelly (23). Britain has the highest teenage pregnancy rate in Western Europe - Kelly got pregnant when she turned 15 and left school.

Thumb sm
Single Mom in London 9
london, uk
By Lihee Avidan
27 Nov 2007

Hassan (5) lives in a dilapidated council flat in South London with his sister Linda (8) and their mum, Kelly (23). Britain has the highest teenage pregnancy rate in Western Europe - Kelly got pregnant when she turned 15 and left school.

Thumb sm
Single Mom in London 6
london, uk
By Lihee Avidan
27 Nov 2007

Single mother (23) and her son Hassan (5) at home in London.

Thumb sm
Single Mom in London 8
london, uk
By Lihee Avidan
28 Sep 2007

Hassan (5) and Linda (8) live in a dilapidated council flat in South London with their mom, Kelly (23). Britain has the highest teenage pregnancy rate in Western Europe - Kelly got pregnant when she turned 15 and left school.

Thumb sm
Single mom in London 5
london, uk
By Lihee Avidan
28 Sep 2007

Single mother Kelly (23) playing with her son Hassan (5) at home.

Thumb sm
Single Mom in London 2
london, uk
By Lihee Avidan
27 Sep 2007

five-year-old Hassan, son of single mother Kelly.

Thumb sm
Single Mom in London 1
london, uk
By Lihee Avidan
25 Sep 2007

Kelly (23) is a single mom and lives with her two children Hassan (5), and Linda (7), on Lawson estate, South London. She got pregnant when she turned 15 and left school. Britain has the highest teenage pregnancy rate in Western Europe.

Thumb sm
Single mom in London 4
london, uk
By Lihee Avidan
25 Sep 2007

Single mother Kelly and her two children Linda and Hassan, in London.