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Syrian refugees detained in Egypt 8
Egypt , Alexandria
By Ahmed Medhat
17 Mar 2015

Detained Syrian women. A group of Syrian refugees have been detained in police stations in Egypt after they tried to reach Europe illegally by boat. Four years after the start of Syria’s civil war, Syrian people are still fleeing to neighboring countries looking for a safer and better life for their children.

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The Pearl-Qatar, Doha, Qatar
The Pearl Qatar, Doha, Qatar
By Mariwan Salihi
02 Sep 2012

The mixed-use artificial island development of "The Pearl-Qatar," in the Qatari capital, Doha.

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Aerial View of The Pearl-Qatar, in Do...
The Pearl Qatar, Doha, Qatar
By Mariwan Salihi
02 Sep 2012

The Pearl-Qatar, a mixed-use, man-made, island development in the Qatari capital Doha.

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Aerial view of Doha, Qatar
Doha, Qatar
By Mariwan Salihi
02 Sep 2012

Aerial view of Doha's West Bay area, north of the Qatari capital.

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Aerial Photo of the Qatari capital Doha
Doha, Qatar
By Mariwan Salihi
02 Sep 2012

Aerial photo of Doha's glitzy business district, "West Bay," north of the Qatari capital.

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Qatar Airways planes at Doha Internat...
Doha, Qatar
By Mariwan Salihi
02 Sep 2012

Planes of Qatar Airways, the flag carrier of Qatar, at Doha International Airport.

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Art-Deco houses in Baghdad's Al-Bataw...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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African immigrants in Baghdad's Al-Ba...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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African immigrants in Baghdad's Al-Ba...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

Date: November 6, 2011

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African immigrant in the Iraqi capita...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

Date: November 6, 2011

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African immigrant in the Iraqi capita...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

Date: November 6, 2011

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African immigrants in the Iraqi capit...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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African immigrants in a Baghdad cafe,...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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African immigrants in Baghdad's Al-Ba...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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An Armenian Orthodox Church in Baghda...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.

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Baghdad's Art-Deco houses in Al-Bataw...
Baghdad, Iraq
By Mariwan Salihi
06 Nov 2011

Art-Deco houses line both sides of Al-Bataween's main road. The "African ghetto" in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad.

Al-Bataween was previously an affluent Jewish quarter, then inhabited by Iraqi Christians (mostly Armenians) after the Jews left Iraq when the state of Israel was created in 1948. Since the 1970s and 1980s, many African immigrants moved to this area, when Iraq was a rich nation with a large foreign presence. Many of the Africans --mostly Sudanese, Somalians and other East-Africans -- left Iraq in the 1990s and after the 2003 American invasion. But a large number of them still regard Iraq as their nation, and continue to live in this impoverished area in central Baghdad.

Once a posh area of the city, Al-Bataween is one of the last areas of the Iraqi capital where dozens of Baghdadi art-deco styled houses still remain --although in dire need of restoration. Anno 2011, it has been turned into a hub of illegal activity, including prostitution, drug dealing and other crimes - hence the comparison to a "ghetto."

Today, there's only one functioning Synagogue left - Meir Taweig - taken care of by Baghdad's last, and decreasing, Jewish community. There's also an Armenian Orthodox Church, at the end of the main street.