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Registering Newborn Babies by Smartph...
Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
By Wouter Elsen
15 Mar 2016

According to a report published in 2013 by UNICEF “One in three children under-five does not officially exist”.
The report says “the births of nearly 230 million children under-five have never been registered; approximately one in three of all children under-five around the world.”
Children unregistered at birth will not have documentation proving who they are, including a birth certificate, which can deny them from accessing education, health care and social security programs and from obtaining a passport.
For poor families in underdeveloped countries, especially those living in remote areas, registering a birth can mean having to travel a great distance to a government office which they do not have time to do or for which they are not able to afford the cost.
Adama Sawadogo, a documentation security consultant in Burkina Faso worked three years on an invention he calls ‘iCivil’ that could revolutionize the registration of children. iCivil couples the SMS text capabilities of a smartphone with a secure authentication technology called ‘Bubble Tag’, developed by the French company Prooftag.
A newborn child receives a wrist bracelet with a QR (Quick Response) barcode which can be scanned by the smartphone. Details of the child’s birth are then sent as an SMS message to a central computer server operated by the government of the country.

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Registering Newborn Babies by Smartphone
Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
By Wouter Elsen
15 Mar 2016

According to a report published in 2013 by UNICEF “One in three children under-five does not officially exist."
The report says “the births of nearly 230 million children under-five have never been registered; approximately one in three of all children under-five around the world.”
Children unregistered at birth will not have documentation proving who they are, including a birth certificate, which can deny them from accessing education, health care and social security programs and from obtaining a passport.
For poor families in underdeveloped countries, especially those living in remote areas, registering a birth can mean having to travel a great distance to a government office which they do not have time to do or for which they are not able to afford the cost.
Adama Sawadogo, a documentation security consultant in Burkina Faso worked three years on an invention he calls ‘iCivil’ that could revolutionize the registration of children. iCivil couples the SMS text capabilities of a smartphone with a secure authentication technology called ‘Bubble Tag’, developed by the French company Prooftag.
A newborn child receives a wrist bracelet with a QR (Quick Response) barcode which can be scanned by the smartphone. Details of the child’s birth are then sent as an SMS message to a central computer server operated by the government of the country.

ROUGH-CUT VERSION AVAILABLE HERE: https://www.transterramedia.com/media/66991

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Beirut Scenic and Street Shots
Beirut, Lebanon
By mchreyteh
05 Feb 2016

Various shots of Beirut streets, people using smart phones and walking in Beirut Souks shopping center.

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Mauritian Youth
Port Louis, Mauritius
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
13 May 2015

This collection features photos of young people in Mauritius: in class at the university and organizing an awareness campaign on campus, and using computers at the inauguration of a community internet access point.

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Mauritius Youth 01
Port Louis, Mauritius
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
12 May 2015

A young person uses a computer at a community internet access point in Mauritius.

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Mauritius Youth 02
Port Louis, Mauritius
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
12 May 2015

A man is helped to use a computer at a community internet access point in Mauritius.

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Mauritius Youth 03
Port Louis, Mauritius
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
12 May 2015

A young person helps community members use a computer at a community internet access point in Mauritius.

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Mauritius Youth 04
Port Louis, Mauritius
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
12 May 2015

A young person uses a computer at a community internet access point in Mauritius.

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Mauritius Youth 05
Port Louis, Mauritius
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
12 May 2015

A young person uses a computer at a community internet access point in Mauritius.

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Mauritius Youth 06
Port Louis, Mauritius
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
12 May 2015

A young person uses a computer at a community internet access point in Mauritius.

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Mauritius Youth 07
Port Louis, Mauritius
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
12 May 2015

University students gather during an HIV/AIDS awareness campaign they organised to inform their peers on the virus and prevention.

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Mauritius Youth 08
Port Louis, Mauritius
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
12 May 2015

University students gather during an HIV/AIDS awareness campaign they organised to inform their peers on the virus and prevention.

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Mauritius Youth 09
Port Louis, Mauritius
By Nasseem ACKBURALLY
12 May 2015

University students gather during an HIV/AIDS awareness campaign they organised to inform their peers on the virus and prevention.

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Sum Dany 01
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
20 Apr 2015

Sum Dany is part of a three-woman team developing a first-of-its-kind mobile application to raise awareness and report cases of domestic abuse in Cambodia.

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Sum Dany 02
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
20 Apr 2015

Sum Dany and Phat Sreytouch talk at a conference dedicated to women's rights and social media about their application. The two are part of a three-woman team developing a first-of-its-kind mobile application to raise awareness and report cases of domestic abuse in Cambodia.

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User Testing
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
20 Apr 2015

Phat Sreytouch conducts a user test on an application she and two other women are developing, dedicated to improving the social situation of women in her country.

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Animation 04
Tbong Khmum, Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
08 Apr 2015

The mobile app uses simple animations to illustrate situations in the everyday lives of women.

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Animation 01
Tbong Khmum, Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
08 Apr 2015

The mobile app uses simple animations to illustrate situations in the everyday lives of women.

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Animation 02
Tbong Khmum, Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
08 Apr 2015

The mobile app uses simple animations to illustrate situations in the everyday lives of women.

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Animation 03
Tbong Khmum, Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
08 Apr 2015

The mobile app uses simple animations to illustrate situations in the everyday lives of women.

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Mobile App Combats Gender Violence in...
Tbong Khmum, Cambodia
By Ana Salvá
31 Mar 2015

Three women have received funding and technological support from the Asia Foundation to develop mobile applications in order to raise awareness of domestic violence in Cambodia and open the door for women who want to report abuses by mobile phone. According to the organization, 93.7% of Cambodians currently have a phone.

Sum Dany’s application is the first under development. "There will be four videos. One will give an explanation of the meaning of violence. Another will explain the risks faced by women and girls. The third will show the laws of violence and victims’ protection that can help them. Finally, the fourth will explain how traditional conduct discriminates against women. Some recommendations will be made. Then there will be a game with questions about gender violence”, she says.

22% of Cambodian women claim to have suffered from physical, sexual or emotional abuse from their husbands. 5% of Cambodian men have participated in at least one gang rape, one of the highest percentages of countries in Asia. Moreover, 38.4% of Cambodian men who committed an act of sexual aggression did not suffer any consequences for doing so.

Some women are discouraged from reporting the facts to the authorities out of fear they will not be believed. They consider going forward to the police a useless means of seeking justice. Worse, it could even worsen the situation by putting them in danger of retaliation, shame and the loss of reputation within their communities.

In cases of rape or abuse, the most common solution is to settle in court or employ the traditional code of conduct taught to girls in school that teaches them to remain silence in view of their husbands’ abuse. “Women in many cases are compensated with money. They are asked to keep quiet or leave home when their husband is angry”, says Dany. This code was removed from school curriculums in 2007 but its influence continues to be taught outside the classroom. 96.2% of Cambodian men and 98.5% of its women still think a woman should obey her husband.

Changing attitudes, whether online or in schools, is one of the basic tasks needed to break the silence imposed by Cambodian society on its women and girls.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Chernobyl Safety Financial Challenges
Chernobyl, Ukraine
By gzhygalov
27 Feb 2015

REPORT EXAMPLE: Chernobyl Safety Financial Challenges. Work continues to make the Chernobyl site safe. But the conflict in eastern Ukraine has created new financial challenges for the Ukrainian authorities. Austerity measures were introduced due to the conflict in the east.

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Startup nets to boards #1
By Zachary F. Volkert
15 May 2014

Ben Kneppers is giving waste wheels with the Bureo Skateboards project – recycling used fishing nets from along the Chilean coast and turning them into skateboards and, in the future, a slew of other products. The company has recycled 2 tons of fishing nets and raised more than $60,000 since January.

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Syrian Rescue Robot 6
Kilis, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
29 Nov 2013

Demonstrating a robot, one of the designers concedes that the project has been difficult financially. His wife had to sell their car in order to fund the project, but there is interest from Doctors Without Borders.

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Syrian Rescue Robot 7
Kilis, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
29 Nov 2013

One of the designers, who asked his face not be shown, demonstrates a small robot meant to carry coffee around the hotel and can be controlled with a remote controlled glove.

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Syrian Rescue Robot 9
Kilis, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
29 Nov 2013

The builders have been renting out a small warehouse in the auto-repair district of Kilis. After telling the Turkish authorities that they are building a 'chocolate machine', they have worked relatively undisturbed.

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Syrian Rescue Robot 10
Kilis, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
29 Nov 2013

Using rendering software, the designers have been able to create detailed schematics of the robotic arms.

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The Robot That Will Save Syrians from...
Kilis, Turkey
By Leyland Cecco
26 Nov 2013

Working in a nondescript machine shop on the outskirts of Kilis, Turkey, a hacker and an engineer duo are putting the finishing touches on the robotic arms of a largely self-funded robot that will rescue casualties of sniper attacks without putting further lives at risk who try to rescue the victims.

The arms will be attached to a modified armoured bulldozer, and controlled using a sophisticated remote system with a 50 kilometre range. The team have been in discussion with Doctors Without Borders (MSF), who have expressed interest in the project and have also been approached by Google Ideas to speak about their work.

With the all important arms now nearing completion, the duo are confident they will be able to get the arms over the Syrian border for final assembly within weeks.

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Food insecurity: Does South Korea hav...
Seoul, South Korea
By maltekol
12 Jul 2013

The World Health Organization warns that overpopulation and a lack of arable land contribute to global food insecurity. So scientists are developing new farming technology to offset potential food shortages. Researchers in South Korea are experimenting with vertical farms; gardens that instead of spreading out, go straight up.
Jason Strother and Malte Kollenberg report from Seoul.

Almost half of South Korea’s 50 millions citizens live here in the capital. And in a country with very limited agricultural land, feeding all of these people presents a challenge. Some observers say the nation faces increasing food insecurity.

Park Hwan-il is food security analyst at the Samsung Economic Research Institute in Seoul.

Int: Park Hwan-il, SERI (English)
"The food self sufficiency rate in Korea is just about 26 percent. Which means three quarters of the food we consume is from the foreign countries. That means the Korean people’s health and nutrition depends on outside factors that we cannot control”

Park says that climate conditions or other instability in the international market makes importing food unpredictable. It’s not only a problem for Korea, but for many other countries too. But some scientists say there is a solution.

Int. from online: Dickson Despommier, Columbia University (English)
“My name is Dickson Despommier: I teach at Columbia Universities Medical School and school of public health. The world would be a much better place, if we had vertical farming.”

Despommier says tower-like hydroponic farms could someday stand alongside skyscrapers as a key food source for billions of city dwellers

Int. from online: Dickson Despommier, Columbia University (English)
“Here’s my vision of what a vertical farm might look like. My gold standard for this is the Apple Store in New York City on 5th Avenue. If you took that building and made it into a five-story building. Now in the building you have multiple floors of course, and inside each floor you have multiple layers of crops.”

Despommier says vertical farms could be a key solution for countries with a growing population or limited arable land. Like South Korea.

30-kilometers south of Seoul in Suwon, the government is trying to make Despommier’s vision a reality. The Rural Development Administration has built the prototype of a vertical farm.Inside this research facility a small team of scientists is working on turning this concept a marketable product.So far, their experiment is only 3-storeys high. But they hope that one day, the technology will expand and be capable of feeding the entire nation.

Agrarian scientist Choi Kyu-hong is still sorting out more basic challenges.

Int: Choi Kyu-hong, RDA (English)
“The plant factory requires a lot of energy, the light energy and the heating and cooling energy. So we provide the heating or cooling energy using geothermal systems. We adopted the solar cell system to provide light source energies, but we are still (only) provide 15 percent of the total energy”

Choi adds his team still faces many challenges:

Int: Choi Kyu-hong, RDA (English)
“We are still (in) the research state, its take some time to make a commercial plant factories. We are firstly trying to find out the optimum wavelength of light”

Choi says the problem is that different plants grow at different speeds, depending on the light’s color and wavelength.

But even though the government hasn’t perfected vertical farming technology yet, some in the private sector are already putting it to use. Inside this Lotte Mart, a supermarket franchise in Seoul, lettuce grows under the lights of this small vertical farm.

Store mangers say produce grown in this facility has extra benefits for customers.

Int: Kim Chang-jo, Lotte Mart
(Korean) “We are the first super market to install a vertical farm. We hope that it will draw attention to environmental concerns. The plants are affordable and no pesticides were used, so its healthier for our customers”

Kim says the vertical farm lettuce costs the same as lettuce grown the old fashioned way. But some analysts say that all the lights and heating systems required to operate a vertical farm is just too expensive to make it a viable solution for food insecurity.

Int: Park Hwan-il, SERI
(English) “Vertical farming costs too much. / Even though the productivity in vertical farming is very high, very good, but it does not have the merit in price or marketing advantage at all”

Back at the Suwon experimental vertical farm, scientists admit they still have a long way to go. The Rural Development Administration’s Lee Hye jin gives a rough time frame.

Int: Lee Hye-jin, RDA
(Korean) “It might take at least five more years of research to make progress on these obstacles. Then vertical farms might be ready for commercial use”

The South Korean scientists say that once all the problems are resolved, vertical farms won't just have to stop at three-stories. The sky is the limit.

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Hollywood Contra Nollywood
Abuja, Nigeria
By Preditor Push
08 May 2013

An article from a journalist friend about the state of the Nigeria Film Industry

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Prince Charles Imparts Royal Advice t...
Amman, Jordan
By Amy Hybels
12 Mar 2013

The lack of job opportunities for young people is a serious problem in Jordan where the Labor Ministry reported an unemployment rate of 21.3% among 18-to-30 year olds.
During a recent visit to the Kingdom, Prince Charles took time to attend a business enterprise conference where he imparted some royal advice to young entrepreneurs. Amy Hybels has the story.

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LOST IN THE JUNGLE
Etaeto, Democratic Republic of Congo
By U.S. Editor
04 Mar 2013

Kalibo Mandigo - Etaeto - Democratic Republic of Congo - September 10th, 2012

The hunt for precious coltan is killing Africa's dwindling Pygmy population. The village of Kalibo Mandigo, located in the Ituri rain forest in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo, lies in the heart of an obscure war zone that few in the West know about. The densely forested expanse along a stretch of border between the nation once known as Zaire and Uganda, furnishes some 80 percent of planet's Columbite Tantalite, or "coltan," an ore that is an essential ingredient in the creation of the miniature Tantalum capacitors present in virtually all electronic devices, including laptops, cell phones and pagers.

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Bricks of Bangladesh
Kushtia, Bangladesh
By Mais Istanbuli
10 Jan 2013

The cities of Bangladesh, one of the world's most densely populated countries, are growing fast and there's a never-ending need for cheap and available construction material. Today, bricks are the most efficient and widely used building material. Each day, new brick buildings are erected across the country. However, the millions of workers who make the bricks face harsh and uncertain conditions. All across Bangladesh, one can witness the towering brick chimneys.

There are more than 10,000 brick fields in the country, twice as many as ten years ago. Since Bangledash is rapidly urbanizing, bricks are a crucial building material. Some bricks get exported to nearby India, but the fields mainly provide for the local construction industry, which faces constant demand. The fields are staffed by hard-working Bangladeshis, many of whom come from rural backgrounds and work seasonally on the fields, which are closed during winter.

While brick-making represents an important part of Bangladesh’s industry, it remains both outdated and harmful to the workers. All the work is done manually, from digging the mud and forming the bricks to burning them in traditional kilns. Some workers live in make-shift buildings on the site, others have their houses and families nearby. The morning shift starts early, followed by a lunch break in the middle of the day. Then, they continue in the afternoon until sunset.

The workers eat together: traditional Bangladeshi fare which is rice accompanied by a spicy vegetable curry, lentils or fish. Many fields have a small pond nearby which allow the workers to rinse off the red dust generated in the brick-making process. The workers vary; young men, and some women too, work side by side with more experienced workers. Many young children work there as well.

While brick-making might provide a better income than agriculture or other jobs available in rural Bangladesh, it is unsafe and detrimental to the laborers' health. Accidents are common and workers have no protective gear. The fields affect nearby towns and villages as well, as the dust spreads across the surrounding areas, generating more health problems.

Moreover, the fields are a major source of environmental pollution. They represent the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the country, with several million tons emitted annually. In an effort to make the industry more sustainable, UNDP Bangladesh has launched a program to make the fields greener and more efficient. Most fields, however, have yet to take the step and replace their old kilns with new technology.

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Embracing of dry toilets technology i...
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
By midakiarie
19 Nov 2012

1.1 billion people around the world defecate in the open, contaminating their environments and water sources besides spreading diseases like diarrhea, which kills 2,000 children less than 5 years old every day.

In Tanzania, only 10 per cent of her people have access to improved sanitation. Over 40 million of citizens in the Eastern Africa country do not have to improved sanitation.

6.5 million people in the country defecate in the open according to Unicef, causing illnesses related to poor hygiene that could have been avoided, and which costs the government millions of money that could otherwise be used for development.

NGOs are introducing dry toilets where modern sanitation facilities that require no water are built in homes and institutions with unreliable or no water supply.

Proponents of this project say the facility is a better option to many people in the world with many countries still facing water shortage problems.

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Hand washing
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
By midakiarie
16 Nov 2012

A man cleans the basin of a dry toilet. The sanitation facility that requires no water is gradually being embraced in Tanzania. Proponents of this project say the facility is a better option to many people in the world with many countries still facing water shortage problems.

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Lost In The Jungle (31 of 31)
Etaeto, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
10 Sep 2012

Kalibo Mandigo - Etaeto - Democratic Republic of Congo - September 10th, 2012

The hunt for precious coltan is killing Africa's dwindling Pygmy population. The village of Kalibo Mandigo, located in the Ituri rain forest in the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo, lies in the heart of an obscure war zone that few in the West know about. The densely forested expanse along a stretch of border between the nation once known as Zaire and Uganda, furnishes some 80 percent of planet's Columbite Tantalite, or "coltan," an ore that is an essential ingredient in the creation of the miniature Tantalum capacitors present in virtually all electronic devices, including laptops, cell phones and pagers. Coltan is panned for by hand in much the same way as gold during the California gold rush of the 19th century. The demand by major companies such as Nokia and Sony for coltan (Australia is the other major source) has made the Congo into a battleground for rogue miners, who enter the country, through Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi. The number of Pygmies is in constant decline as a result of the border fighting. On the move constantly, the pygmies, who are considered inferior, face the wrath of Congolese troops and Rwandan raiders who cross the border seeking the coltan. They were victims of rape, murder and cannibalism. According to Minority Rights Group International there is extensive evidence of mass killing, cannibalism and rape of Pygmies and they have urged the International Criminal Court to investigate a campaign of extermination against pygmies. Although they have been targeted by virtually all the armed groups, much of the violence against Pygmies is attributed to the rebel group, Movement for the Liberation of Congo.

The picture shows a pygmi who have been climbed a twenty-five meters, in searching of animals for hunting.