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Istanbul Fashion Week 2013 (11 of 53)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
13 Mar 2013

The Fall/Winter lineup during the Tuvanam show at Istanbul Fashion Week in Istanbul, Turkey.

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Istanbul Fashion Week 2013 (9 of 53)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
13 Mar 2013

The Fall/Winter lineup during the Tuvanam show at Istanbul Fashion Week in Istanbul, Turkey.

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Istanbul Fashion Week 2013 (8 of 53)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
13 Mar 2013

The Fall/Winter lineup during the Tuvanam show at Istanbul Fashion Week in Istanbul, Turkey.

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Istanbul Fashion Week 2013 (7 of 53)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
13 Mar 2013

The Fall/Winter lineup during the Tuvanam show at Istanbul Fashion Week in Istanbul, Turkey.

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Istanbul Fashion Week 2013 (6 of 53)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
13 Mar 2013

Attendees before the the Tuvanam show at Istanbul Fashion Week in Istanbul, Turkey.

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Istanbul Fashion Week 2013 (5 of 53)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
13 Mar 2013

Attendees before the the Tuvanam show at Istanbul Fashion Week in Istanbul, Turkey.

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Istanbul Fashion Week 2013 (4 of 53)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
13 Mar 2013

Attendees before the the Tuvanam show at Istanbul Fashion Week in Istanbul, Turkey.

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Istanbul Fashion Week 2013 (3 of 53)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
13 Mar 2013

Attendees before the the Tuvanam show at Istanbul Fashion Week in Istanbul, Turkey.

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Istanbul Fashion Week 2013 (2 of 53)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
13 Mar 2013

Attendees before the the Tuvanam show at Istanbul Fashion Week in Istanbul, Turkey.

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Istanbul Fashion Week 2013 (1 of 53)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
13 Mar 2013

After the the Tuvanam show at Istanbul Fashion Week in Istanbul, Turkey.

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Morrocco on two wheels (15 of 25)
Taroudant, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
27 Feb 2013

Will they carry shopping home in the qobs of their djellabas or will they use the back rack of the bike?

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HIJABISTAS IN INDONESIA
Jakarta, Indonesia
By Mais Istanbuli
06 Nov 2012

In Jakarta, they call them "Hijabistas" - a mix of hijab and fashionistas. They love glamourous clothes and colors. They are very feminine yet they still wear their muslim outfits and respect the Quran's values.

Indonesian fashion designers are hoping to turn Indonesia into the world’s Muslim fashion Mecca within the next decade. The country, which has the largest Muslim population, is already on the right path. Many designers have already established flourishing businesses in their local communities. Some of them even made it to the international market. Distancing themselves from the traditional black burqa, those Islamic fashion designers are now proposing new and unique clothing and hijab styles for muslim women from all around the globe.

The clothes, which are sold throughout the whole muslim world, are made in the outskirts of Jakarta. The capital even have its own fashion week, dedicated to this type of clothing. Dian Pelangi, a well known Indonesian fashion designer, even created a special collection for the Eid celebration this year, which she presented at the fashion week a couple of weeks ago. She even created an innovative jilbab (long and loose-fit coat or garment worn by some Muslim women) series called Circle Shawl to encourage more young women to wear the jilbab.

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Hijabistas In Indonesia (Part 1 of 5)
Jakarta, Indonesia
By Anne DELAISTRE
06 Nov 2012

In Jakarta, they call them "Hijabistas" - a mix of hijab and fashionistas. They love glamourous clothes and colors. They are very feminine yet they still wear their muslim outfits and respect the Quran's values.

Indonesian fashion designers are hoping to turn Indonesia into the world’s Muslim fashion Mecca within the next decade. The country, which has the largest Muslim population, is already on the right path. Many designers have already established flourishing businesses in their local communities. Some of them even made it to the international market. Distancing themselves from the traditional black burqa, those Islamic fashion designers are now proposing new and unique clothing and hijab styles for muslim women from all around the globe.

The clothes, which are sold throughout the whole muslim world, are made in the outskirts of Jakarta. The capital even have its own fashion week, dedicated to this type of clothing. Dian Pelangi, a well known Indonesian fashion designer, even created a special collection for the Eid celebration this year, which she presented at the fashion week a couple of weeks ago. She even created an innovative jilbab (long and loose-fit coat or garment worn by some Muslim women) series called Circle Shawl to encourage more young women to wear the jilbab.

En Indonésie on les appelle les hijabistas : contraction d'hijab et fashionista : elles aiment le glamour et les couleurs. Elles portent leurs tenues musulmanes dans le plus grand respect des préceptes du Coran, mais elles sont très féminines. Loin de la burqa, la mode musulmane connait désormais sa capitale : Jakarta. Les designers rivalisent d'idées pour sortir du triste voile foncé et des robes sombres.

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Hijabistas In Indonesia (Part 2 of 5)
Jakarta, Indonesia
By Anne DELAISTRE
06 Nov 2012

In Jakarta, they call them "Hijabistas" - a mix of hijab and fashionistas. They love glamourous clothes and colors. They are very feminine yet they still wear their muslim outfits and respect the Quran's values.

Indonesian fashion designers are hoping to turn Indonesia into the world’s Muslim fashion Mecca within the next decade. The country, which has the largest Muslim population, is already on the right path. Many designers have already established flourishing businesses in their local communities. Some of them even made it to the international market. Distancing themselves from the traditional black burqa, those Islamic fashion designers are now proposing new and unique clothing and hijab styles for muslim women from all around the globe.

The clothes, which are sold throughout the whole muslim world, are made in the outskirts of Jakarta. The capital even have its own fashion week, dedicated to this type of clothing. Dian Pelangi, a well known Indonesian fashion designer, even created a special collection for the Eid celebration this year, which she presented at the fashion week a couple of weeks ago. She even created an innovative jilbab (long and loose-fit coat or garment worn by some Muslim women) series called Circle Shawl to encourage more young women to wear the jilbab.

En Indonésie on les appelle les hijabistas : contraction d'hijab et fashionista : elles aiment le glamour et les couleurs. Elles portent leurs tenues musulmanes dans le plus grand respect des préceptes du Coran, mais elles sont très féminines. Loin de la burqa, la mode musulmane connait désormais sa capitale : Jakarta. Les designers rivalisent d'idées pour sortir du triste voile foncé et des robes sombres.

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Hijabistas In Indonesia (Part 3 of 5)
Jakarta, Indonesia
By Anne DELAISTRE
06 Nov 2012

In Jakarta, they call them "Hijabistas" - a mix of hijab and fashionistas. They love glamourous clothes and colors. They are very feminine yet they still wear their muslim outfits and respect the Quran's values.

Indonesian fashion designers are hoping to turn Indonesia into the world’s Muslim fashion Mecca within the next decade. The country, which has the largest Muslim population, is already on the right path. Many designers have already established flourishing businesses in their local communities. Some of them even made it to the international market. Distancing themselves from the traditional black burqa, those Islamic fashion designers are now proposing new and unique clothing and hijab styles for muslim women from all around the globe.

The clothes, which are sold throughout the whole muslim world, are made in the outskirts of Jakarta. The capital even have its own fashion week, dedicated to this type of clothing. Dian Pelangi, a well known Indonesian fashion designer, even created a special collection for the Eid celebration this year, which she presented at the fashion week a couple of weeks ago. She even created an innovative jilbab (long and loose-fit coat or garment worn by some Muslim women) series called Circle Shawl to encourage more young women to wear the jilbab.

En Indonésie on les appelle les hijabistas : contraction d'hijab et fashionista : elles aiment le glamour et les couleurs. Elles portent leurs tenues musulmanes dans le plus grand respect des préceptes du Coran, mais elles sont très féminines. Loin de la burqa, la mode musulmane connait désormais sa capitale : Jakarta. Les designers rivalisent d'idées pour sortir du triste voile foncé et des robes sombres.

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Hijabistas In Indonesia (Part 4 of 5)
Jakarta, Indonesia
By Anne DELAISTRE
06 Nov 2012

In Jakarta, they call them "Hijabistas" - a mix of hijab and fashionistas. They love glamourous clothes and colors. They are very feminine yet they still wear their muslim outfits and respect the Quran's values.

Indonesian fashion designers are hoping to turn Indonesia into the world’s Muslim fashion Mecca within the next decade. The country, which has the largest Muslim population, is already on the right path. Many designers have already established flourishing businesses in their local communities. Some of them even made it to the international market. Distancing themselves from the traditional black burqa, those Islamic fashion designers are now proposing new and unique clothing and hijab styles for muslim women from all around the globe.

The clothes, which are sold throughout the whole muslim world, are made in the outskirts of Jakarta. The capital even have its own fashion week, dedicated to this type of clothing. Dian Pelangi, a well known Indonesian fashion designer, even created a special collection for the Eid celebration this year, which she presented at the fashion week a couple of weeks ago. She even created an innovative jilbab (long and loose-fit coat or garment worn by some Muslim women) series called Circle Shawl to encourage more young women to wear the jilbab.

En Indonésie on les appelle les hijabistas : contraction d'hijab et fashionista : elles aiment le glamour et les couleurs. Elles portent leurs tenues musulmanes dans le plus grand respect des préceptes du Coran, mais elles sont très féminines. Loin de la burqa, la mode musulmane connait désormais sa capitale : Jakarta. Les designers rivalisent d'idées pour sortir du triste voile foncé et des robes sombres.

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Hijabistas In Indonesia (Part 5 of 5)
Jakarta, Indonesia
By Anne DELAISTRE
06 Nov 2012

In Jakarta, they call them "Hijabistas" - a mix of hijab and fashionistas. They love glamourous clothes and colors. They are very feminine yet they still wear their muslim outfits and respect the Quran's values.

Indonesian fashion designers are hoping to turn Indonesia into the world’s Muslim fashion Mecca within the next decade. The country, which has the largest Muslim population, is already on the right path. Many designers have already established flourishing businesses in their local communities. Some of them even made it to the international market. Distancing themselves from the traditional black burqa, those Islamic fashion designers are now proposing new and unique clothing and hijab styles for muslim women from all around the globe.

The clothes, which are sold throughout the whole muslim world, are made in the outskirts of Jakarta. The capital even have its own fashion week, dedicated to this type of clothing. Dian Pelangi, a well known Indonesian fashion designer, even created a special collection for the Eid celebration this year, which she presented at the fashion week a couple of weeks ago. She even created an innovative jilbab (long and loose-fit coat or garment worn by some Muslim women) series called Circle Shawl to encourage more young women to wear the jilbab.

En Indonésie on les appelle les hijabistas : contraction d'hijab et fashionista : elles aiment le glamour et les couleurs. Elles portent leurs tenues musulmanes dans le plus grand respect des préceptes du Coran, mais elles sont très féminines. Loin de la burqa, la mode musulmane connait désormais sa capitale : Jakarta. Les designers rivalisent d'idées pour sortir du triste voile foncé et des robes sombres.

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Fashion in Nigeria
Lagos, Nigeria
By Serene Yordi
21 Oct 2012

Nigeria’s growing talent in the fashion industry was on display during Lagos MTN Fashion and Design Week in October. For the first time Nigeria saw high-end European buyers such as Selfridges $Co, MyTheresa.com attend. British designer Matthew Williamson rounded up the show with a recent collection and many talented Nigerian designers showcased their work.

Nigeria is a developing country with less than most of the population living on $1 a day. Most of the countries economy is based in oil exports, however Nigeria country is beginning to tap into and value its creative potential. This comes at a time when a middle class is rapidly growing and more Nigerians have disposable income. Nigeria is becoming noticed internationally as buyers around the world are increasingly attending these fashion shows and taking on board some of the talented Nigerian designers.

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Fashion in Nigeria (14 of 20)
lagos, nigeria
By Ruth Mcdowall
21 Oct 2012

Photographers during Lagos Fashion week in Nigeria

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Fashion in Nigeria (10 of 20)
lagos, Nigeria
By Ruth Mcdowall
21 Oct 2012

Designer Kola Kuddos shows his collection during Lagos Fashion Week

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Fashion in Nigeria (9 of 20)
Lagos, Nigeria
By Ruth Mcdowall
21 Oct 2012

Kola Kudda's collection during Lagos Fashion week in Lagos Nigeria.

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Fashion in Nigeria (8 of 20)
Lagos, Nigeria
By Ruth Mcdowall
21 Oct 2012

Catwalk show during Lagos Fashion week in Nigeria

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Fashion in Nigeria (20 of 20)
Lagos, Nigeria
By Ruth Mcdowall
20 Oct 2012

Matthew Williamson is interviewed during a fashion week in Lagos Nigeria where one of his collections was on show.

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Lady in Red
Kabul, Afghanistan
By MediaMikeDC
31 Mar 2012

A lady dresses in red walking in Kabul, Afghanistan

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The New Faces of St. Petersburg
St. Petersburg, Russia
By alfredoc
31 Dec 2011

During the winter in St. Petersburg, time seems to stand still when night falls, and the white mist all around begs lovers never to leave each other, keeps the city's youth together. After the fall of the Soviet Union and Communism, emerging Russian youth cultures strongly felt the influences of their contemporary American and European neighbors.

Twenty years later, St. Petersburg has rid itself of the myth of being a city of sex tourism. Today St. Petersburg has taken on a more European air, and to the youth feels more akin to Generation Y dream cities like Berlin and London. It is about post-perestroika youth pushing the limits of culture where it was once forbidden to watch western films, listen to western radio or even wear bluejeans.