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Bangladesh circus 09
Ghatail
By Eleanor Moseman
01 Feb 2014

Families take moments at the edge of the circus and await their family members that are spectators at other events.

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Bangladesh circus 01
Ghatail
By Eleanor Moseman
01 Feb 2014

An circus trainer rides his elephant up and down the roads of Bangladesh collecting cash tolls.

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Bangladesh circus 21
Ghatail
By Eleanor Moseman
01 Feb 2014

A Wall of Death rider grabs for a 10 Taka note. This stunt rider has been riding for nearly 10 years without any accidents.

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Bangladesh circus 02
Ghatail
By Eleanor Moseman
01 Feb 2014

Two young women exit, precariously, down the steps from the Wall of Death.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 02
Brigadier General Fructuoso Rivera, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
30 Jan 2014

The sun sets over a cattle farm. Uruguay was founded on cattle industry, and is one of the world's biggest "meat economies" with 3 cows per person, so roughly 9 million cattle. It comes as no surprise that 75% of the country's exports are agriculture related.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 04
Brigadier General Fructuoso Rivera, Curtina 45002, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
30 Jan 2014

Route 5 from Montevideo to Tacuarembo. In rural Uruguay almost 100 thousand people (gauchos, laborers and farmers) share the environment with animals. Their cattle and horses are raised in the open air, under natural conditions with a mild climate, fertile land and abundant water.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 05
Curtina, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
30 Jan 2014

Two Uruguayan gauchos, father and son, are build their new family-home at Curtina, a rural village located deep in the Uruguayan countryside. However, the majority of the country's population (approximately 80%) live in urban areas, mostly in Montevideo.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 07
Brigadier General Fructuoso Rivera, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
30 Jan 2014

An abandoned bus sits alongside route 5 between Tacuarembo with Montevideo. The national route, passing clear across the country, is one of the most important highways for the meat economy in Uruguay.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 16
Curtina, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
30 Jan 2014

V. (41) works in a small rural bakery near Tacuarembo. She is proud of her daughter who works for an International Company. "Luckly, my daughter will be able to travel around the world, discovering places and beauty, far from this rural reality!" she said.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 03
Curtina, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
29 Jan 2014

Robert Da Silva is a Gaucho, storyteller and researcher on rural education. He started to study Uruguayan traditions and rural anthropology after 30 years as Gaucho, working with cattle and horses. With the help of his friend and anthropologist Mr. Diaz, Robert wrote two books on rural legends and traditions. Nowadays he is a trainer in several "Escuelas rurales," or rural schools.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 08
Curtina, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
29 Jan 2014

Carlos, a mechanic, poses with his sons for a portrait in Tacuarembo. Of African descent, his roots in Uruguay trace back to the slave trade. In the late 18th century, Montevideo became a major arrival port for slaves, mostly bound for Spanish colonies, like the endless fields of Uruguay.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 09
Curtina, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
29 Jan 2014

Uruguayan anthropologist Walter Diaz (66) drinks YerbaMate and takes a rest with Don Ulisse Gonzalez (80), an old gaucho. Mr. Diaz works on a rural education development and training program with the Uruguayan "Escuelas Rurales" (rural schools).

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 10
Brigadier General Fructuoso Rivera, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
29 Jan 2014

A closed "quilombo" or "prostibulo" alongside route 5 to Tacuarembo. "Quilombo" originally meant "brothel" in Lunfardo, a form of slang popularized by criminals in the early 20th century. Prostitution in Uruguay is legal for persons over the age of 18. It is commonly practiced in major cities, tourist resorts and rural communities.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 06
Curtina, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
29 Jan 2014

Argentina, 57, works in a kiosk at a bus stop. She lives in a rural village near Tacuarembo, the heart of Uruguay, with her husband. Her daughter (15) "is a good student with big dreams," she said. "She's got dreams too big for this small village where people live with cattle and horses, hoping to sell the land to some land grabber, a soy company for instance, and move to the capital." She added, "I voted Mujica hoping for a better future for my daughter."

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 14
Barra de Valizas, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
16 Jan 2014

Barra de Valizas, known as Valizas by locals, is located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in the Rocha Department of southeastern Uruguay. Well renowned for its beaches, Valizas has attracted trendy surfers and vacation seekers that are slowly changing the lifestyle here from a rustic one to one defined by tourism and the habits of the global leisure class.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 12
Cabo Polonio, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
14 Jan 2014

People ride on horseback down the beach from Valizas to Cabo Polonio, a remote and completely sustainable village between the Atlantic and a desert landscape of shifting sand dunes. The village is a bohemian outpost just south of the Brazilian border, where squatters have been developing a "green-village" without electricity or running water since the 60s.

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Salt of the earth 025
Nuodeng, China, Yunnan
By David Tacon
17 Jun 2013

Huang Jingfei, 35, gathers corn husks on the upper level of his home as feed for his mules. Huang's family has lived in Nuodeng for 22 generations.

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Salt of the earth 026
Nuodeng, China, Yunnan
By David Tacon
17 Jun 2013

A local man repairs a rein worn by mules in the thousand year old Nuodeng, once known as China's wealthiest village through its trade of salt. Mules are still used to transport heavy loads over the village's steep and narrow stone paths.

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Salt of the earth 027
Nuodeng, China, Yunnan
By David Tacon
17 Jun 2013

A view from the hills above Nuodeng, once known as China's wealthiest village through its trade of salt. Today, salt-cured Nuodeng ham, which was traded all the way to India on the southern silk road, is major source of income for the town, along with tourism. Demand for Nuodeng ham leapt seventeen fold in a week after the village was featured in the hit television series 'Taste of China,' produced by China Central Television.

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Salt of the earth 019
Nuodeng, China, Yunnan
By David Tacon
16 Jun 2013

Ayi Huang prepares a meal in her kitchen using bits of precious Nuodeng ham.

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Salt of the earth 024
Nuodeng, China, Yunnan
By David Tacon
16 Jun 2013

A young girl, a member of the Huang salt merchant family plays near a barn close to the Huang's ancestral compound. The Huang family has lived in Nuodeng for more than 20 generations, although this child's parents have left the village as migrant workers to better provide for them.

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Salt of the earth 020
Nuodeng, China, Yunnan
By David Tacon
16 Jun 2013

Chopped Nuodeng ham in Ayi Huang's kitchen. Today, salt-cured Nuodeng ham, which was traded all the way to India on the southern silk road, is major source of income for the town, along with tourism.

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Salt of the earth 022
Nuodeng, China, Yunnan
By David Tacon
16 Jun 2013

A young girl, a member of the Huang salt merchant family near the Huang's ancestral compound.

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Salt of the earth 023
Nuodeng, China, Yunnan
By David Tacon
16 Jun 2013

A young girl, a member of the Huang salt merchant family plays with a puppy in front of the Huang's ancestral compound. The Huang family has lived in Nuodeng for more than 20 generations, although these children's parents have left the village as migrant workers to better provide for them.

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Salt of the earth 021
Nuodeng, China, Yunnan
By David Tacon
16 Jun 2013

Young members of the Huang salt merchant family play with puppies in front of the Huang's ancestral compound. The Huang family has lived in Nuodeng for more than 20 generations, although these children's parents have left the village as migrant workers to better provide for them. Nuodeng was known as China's wealthiest village through its trade of salt.

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Urban Poverty
Karachi, Pakistan
By U.S. Editor
14 May 2013

n Pakistan, a nation of 160 million people, 34% of its population lives below the poverty line. This estimate is much higher than the official government figure of 24%, but precious little seems to have been done to address the issue.

This problem is directly linked to the country tax structure, with the majority of the revenues going into coffers of federal and provincial government, forcing the local bodies dealing directly with the poverty to plead with these authorities for more money. The debate over this issue has been ongoing for years.

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Broom makers of Manito, Albay (1 of 16)
Manito, Albay, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
13 Apr 2013

A woman weaving broomcorn grasses.


Broomcom (Sorghum Vulgare) is a variety of upright grass mostly found on the mountainous area of Manito, Albay. One of the major livelihood of people in this far flung area is making soft broom and they sell each broom from 20 pesos to 150 pesos.

Manito, Albay is around 15 hours away from Manila, capital of Philippines.

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Mopti, Mali (1 of 3)
Mopti, Mali.
By George Henton
01 Feb 2013

Image from Mopti, Mali, taken during the ongoing conflict in West Africa.

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Rural Life in Al-Raqqa
Raqqa, Syria
By TTM Contributor 3
31 Jan 2013

This is a picture of life in the rural countryside of Raqqa.

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Education in Rural Uganda (7 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
26 Jul 2012

The rich red dirt paths that link the small village leave their mark on the children. More than 90% of Ugandans live in a rural area, with attendance rates in these areas lower than in urban hubs.

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Education in Rural Uganda (6 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
26 Jul 2012

Like all other teachers in Young Cranes Primary School, Moreen Nakiboneka teaches in English, a historical nod to Uganda's colonial past. She is a recent graduate from university, and confided that while she loves teaching, the pay, only $150 a month, isn't enough for her to make ends meet. She does, however, command the respect of the village elders and her students.

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Education in Rural Uganda (1 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
26 Jul 2012

Early in the morning, Nico, Teo, Tina, Nakato and Eva of Conde Hill Orphanage run to school. Many have lost family because of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Uganda. Teo and Tina, for example, are 8 year-old twin girls who were homeless for two years after losing their family to HIV/AIDS. Conde Hill founder Gideon Mubiru, who lost 37 of his 39 siblings to HIV/AIDS, took them in. Over time Tina had grown to be skeptical of outsiders, so the members of Conde Hill had a tough challenge to overcome. Furthermore, Teo has a mental disability that places her a year behind her sister. Because of support from local charity Gideon Anti-AIDS Foundation (GAAF), these students are given the chance to attend school each day. Slowly, students like Tina and Teo can learn to smile again in the wake of this new educational opportunity. GAFF covers the cost of housing, food and uniforms for the students.

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Education in Rural Uganda (13 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
26 Jul 2012

Students take a break between lessons in Young Cranes Primary. While education is universal, fees for meals, supplies and uniforms still place a large financial burden on many families.

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Education in Rural Uganda (14 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
26 Jul 2012

Teo (left) and Tina (right) can be playful, but Tina is still very protective of her sister.

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Education in Rural Uganda (9 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
25 Jul 2012

Chalk slates are used by many of the students, another symptom of resource shortages. Relative to incomes, notebooks can prove to be costly.

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Education in Rural Uganda (2 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
25 Jul 2012

Young Cranes Primary consist of three tin roofed brick building and adjoining thatched straw rooms. As many as 70% percent of rural schools lack adequate classrooms, and lessons are often held outside.

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Education in Rural Uganda (11 of 14)
Bombo, Uganda
By Leyland Cecco
25 Jul 2012

Many of the classrooms are minimally equipped and rely on old, often out of date texts. Teachers are forced to make do with the resource shortage. Moreen Nakiboneka teaches in a classroom illuminated only by the soft rays of light streaming through the windows. She is also one of the lucky teachers. In rural areas, government-run schools often have high student/teacher ratios and many will lack electricity. In some areas, there are as many as 200 students to 1 teacher.