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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

A girl is engaged in the French lesson. They also study English and Arabic as co-official languages ​​of the Lebanese education system

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

School starts at 3 pm. There are very few teachers in the town and they work in the public school up in the morning.

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The school for refugee children in Qaa is one of three schools that hosts child refugees in the area. The other two schools are in no man's land territory

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

Almost every day the children receive a caloric suplement as biscuits or sandwich and fruit juice during the afternoon

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The nursery. There are 70 Syrian children aged from 3 to 6 years divided in two classrooms

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The school for refugee children in Qaa (Lebanese-Syrian border) was the first school to receive Syrian children at the beginning of the conflict. Due to the dedication of Father Elyen Nasrallah, priest of the Greek Catholic Parish Church of Qaa and the support of international organizations such as L'Oeuvre d'Orient and L'IECD (Institut Européen de Coopération et de Développement), more than 250 children aged from 3 to 12 years living in tents on "no-man’s land" between the Syrian and Lebanese frontier posts, known as Mashari El Qaa, can receive primary education and participate in several activities such as the Christmas party, mother's day, etc.. They arrived fleeing the battles from northern Syria, and many have lost some of their relatives.

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

Monthly medical examination at the public school. In general all the children are in good health

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School for refugee children in Qaa
Qaa (Lebanon-Syrian border) Bekaa Valley
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The school for refugee children in Qaa (Lebanese-Syrian border) was the first school to receive Syrian children at the beginning of the conflict. Due to the dedication of Father Elyen Nasrallah, priest of the Greek Catholic Parish Church of Qaa and the support of international organizations such as L'Oeuvre d'Orient and L'IECD (Institut Européen de Coopération et de Développement), more than 250 children aged from 3 to 12 years living in tents on "no-man’s land" between the Syrian and Lebanese frontier posts, known as Mashari El Qaa, can receive primary education and participate in several activities such as the Christmas party, mother's day, etc.. They arrived fleeing the battles from northern Syria, and many have lost some of their relatives.

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School for refugee children in Qaa (...
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

The school for refugee children in Qaa (Lebanese-Syrian border) was the first school to receive Syrian children at the beginning of the conflict. Due to the dedication of Father Elyen Nasrallah, priest of the Greek Catholic Parish Church of Qaa and the support of international organizations such as L'Oeuvre d'Orient and L'IECD (Institut Européen de Coopération et de Développement), more than 250 children aged from 3 to 12 years living in tents on "no-man’s land" between the Syrian and Lebanese frontier posts, known as Mashari El Qaa, can receive primary education and participate in many cultural activities . They arrived fleeing the battles from northern Syria, and many have lost some of their relatives.

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Climate change bangladesh 12
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
28 Jun 2014

Rohim Shekh, 72, walks through an area devastated by Cyclone Aila in 2007. He was displaced by the Cyclone, which many now see as a result of climate change.

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Climate change bangladesh 13
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
28 Jun 2014

This community was devastated by cyclones Aila in 2007 and Sidr in 2009. People here still face hardships from these catastrophic events, some of them traveling miles for fresh water.

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Climate change bangladesh 10
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
28 Jun 2014

This community was devastated by cyclones Aila in 2007 and Sidr in 2009. People here still face hardships from these catastrophic events, some of them traveling miles for fresh water.

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Center of Medical support in Qaa
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
18 Jun 2014

Syrian refugees waiting in the medical center at the village of Kaa, the Syrian Lebanese border. The parish of Ka´a is helping refugees on the border with medical and emergency supplies and consultations in the health center. Inside no man´s land they are providing vaccines, food and basic kits.

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The Greek return to the land 03
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

“The movement of return to the land is possible because of the late urbanization of Greece”, underlines Kasimis Charalambos, from his desk of researcher in the University of agriculture of Athens. “Almost every Greek has kept a piece of land in his village of origin”, he adds. Dimitris lives in the house built by his grand-father and works the field that the latter bought decades ago. In spite of this support, it is only now, after five years of continuous efforts, that he sees the end of the tunnel: “This winter will be decisive; my production will be certified ecologic, I will be able to raise the price. Until now, between the price of tools, the rent of the new lands I bought and the salary of the workers, I did not earn anything. Still, I work between 12 to 16 hours every day during the winter!”

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The Greek return to the land 04
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

In the midst of an economic crisis in which Greece lost more than 600.000 jobs, 40.000 agriculture jobs were created between 2009 and 2011! “The rural world resists better than other sectors of the Greek economy. It progressively turns into a refuge and a laboratory of ideas for many city-dwellers, who head for it, by necessity or choice”, claims Kasimis Charalambos. Every choice comes with sacrifices. Dimitris knows it all too well: “The first thing you lose by leaving the city are your social relations. I broke up with my girlfriend because of the distance. Here, you need to be stable not to go mad after two months!” he warns. "Still, whenever a client tells me that my olives are the best he ever tasted, all my efforts are rewarded!"

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The Greek return to the land 06
Pelion
By Emmanuel Haddad
09 Jun 2014

"Hypericum is great to appease stings or wounds", she explains, fliting around the bushes, her wicker basket in hand. "I learned a lot about homeopathic plants with my mother, who is from Crete. It is a tradition there. But since I live here, I had the opportunity to really deepen and experiment this savoir-faire", she says. "The return to the land is a return to the tradition, as well as a post-modern phenomena", confirms Kasimis Charalambos.

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North Korea in Black and White 008
By Ulrik Pedersen
08 Jun 2014

people gather to work in the rice fields during planting season. Hamhung, North Korea.

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North Korea in Black and White 025
By Ulrik Pedersen
02 Jun 2014

A typical rural village in North Korea with single floor white buildings. Is in the rural area most poor people are living. They can't move to other districts without approval from authorities. Outside Pyongyang, North Korea.

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Andrea's family
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Mar 2014

Andrea is eating lunch with her mother and her father. She says she doesn't know if she will stay in Pungesti when she grows older. She thinks there is no future in Pungesti if Chevron continues its fracking activities because it will destroy the area's natural resources. The majority of villagers in Pungesti are farmers who depend on agriculture to survive.

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Andrea's family
By Ulrik Pedersen
12 Mar 2014

Andrea is eating lunch with her mother and her father. They took part in protests against Chevron. Police officers are constantly patrolling outside their house.

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Teenagers on the main square
By Ulrik Pedersen
11 Mar 2014

Two teenagers sitting on the main square, in front of a local shop. Unemployment is a plague in Pungesti. Most people have nothing to do besides hanging out around the bar and shops.

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Carriage
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

A man on a carriage going through the village's main square. Pungesti is one of Romania's poorest villages. It lacks basic infrastructures such as paved roads.

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Children playing
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

Two girls playing on the village's main road which also passes by Chevron's compound. Pungesti, Romania.

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Youth's hopeless future
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

Pungesti's villagers say environmental impact of fracking is jeopodizing the future of villages like Pungesti. Many young people are already forced to leave the village and go to Western Romania to find work.

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Pungesti child
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

Lack of opportunities and poverty is forcing the youth to leave Pungesti. Even education is difficult to access. Children who want to pursue their education after 9th grade are forced to go to school loated 37 kilometers away from Pungesti.

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angry man
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

This poor farmer says there is no point in fighting Chevron and the Romanian government because Pungesti's resident will remain poor no matter what happens.

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Pungesti's elderly
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

A poor elderly sitting in his small room. The man says the mayor burned down his house after he got in a fight with his father. Residents of Pungesti accuse the village's mayor of corruption.

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Youth unemployment
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

Teenagers hanging out in the main square. Unemployment forces youth to either leave Pungesti, work with their family or apply for jobs at Chevron.

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Farmer
By Ulrik Pedersen
10 Mar 2014

A farmer on haystack. Most people in Pungesti are farmers and rely on agriculture to survive. They say they oppose Chevron because they were not given enough information about the company's activities. They also fear that fracking will lead to health problems, water and air pollution and deforestation.

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Man with horses
By Ulrik Pedersen
09 Mar 2014

A man with his horses on the main street of Pungesti. The village is one of the poorest in Romanian. It lacks basic infrastructures like paved roads. Horses remain the main means of transportation.

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Organizing the protests
By Ulrik Pedersen
09 Mar 2014

A man is motivating other protesters before going to Chevron's compound to demonstrate. There is no actual leader, but some people are more active than others and try to encourage people from the village to keep fighting for the cause.

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The activists' headquarter
By Ulrik Pedersen
09 Mar 2014

The activists' headquarters from where they organize their protests. At first, activists stayed in tent camps around Chevron's compound. They move to this house when the winter came. Hundreds of activists from all across the country flocked to Pungesti to supports the villagers' fight, but they all left to go back to their hometowns. Only one activist from Bucharest remains in the village now.

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Romanian flag
By Ulrik Pedersen
09 Mar 2014

A Romanian flag hung in a three. Similar flags and signs saying "Chevron go out" or "No Fracking in Pungesti" have been hung across Pungesti and the surrounding villages to protest against' Chevron's fracking activities in the area. Pungesti, Romania.

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Horseriding
By Ulrik Pedersen
09 Mar 2014

A man scouting the area around Chevron's compound. Horses are still the main means of transportation in Pungesti.

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Police filming protesters
By Ulrik Pedersen
09 Mar 2014

Police filming protesters. Activists often post videos on social media to raise awareness about their cause. As a result, the police also started filming the protests in case protesters accuse them of brutality.

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Gendarmerie
By Ulrik Pedersen
09 Mar 2014

A police officer observing villagers protesting against Chevron's fracking activities in the area. Pungesti is one of the poorest villages in Romania but its people have been standing up against the US giant corporation Chevron for months.

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Encounter
By Ulrik Pedersen
09 Mar 2014

A protester is trying to provoke a police officer from the gendarmerie. Both parties constantly try to provoke each other to justify their presence and actions.

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Villagers gathering
By Ulrik Pedersen
09 Mar 2014

Villagers discussing Chevron's activities. Residents and farmers of Pungesti are determined to keep fighting against Chevron's exploitation of their land.

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Villagers Gathering
By Ulrik Pedersen
09 Mar 2014

Men from the village often gather to discuss issues and strategies related to Chevron's activities in the area.