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Meroe Pyramids 01
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

A local guide offers camel rides to tourists and visitors.

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Meroe Pyramids 02
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Locals offer camel rides to tourists and visitors. Here they wait for clients under the hot sun.

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Meroe Pyramids 03
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

The royal pyramids at Meroe were built in Nubia 800 years after the Egyptians finished building theirs.

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Meroe Pyramids 04
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

The royal pyramids at Meroe were built in Nubia 800 years after the Egyptians finished building theirs.

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Meroe Pyramids 05
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

These the Meroe pyramids are among the best preserved in Sudan.

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Meroe Pyramids 06
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

There are more than 230 pyramids in Sudan, stretching across the ancient Nubian kingdom.

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Meroe Pyramids 07
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

The pyramids are the burial site for more than 40 Nubian kings and queens

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Meroe Pyramids 08
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Through the years the pyramids have been plundered of all their wealth.

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Meroe Pyramids 09
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Some pyramids have been partially restored, looking new in comparison with their neighbours.

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Meroe Pyramids 10
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Excavation of the pyramids began only in the middle of the 19th century.

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Meroe Pyramids 11
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Through the years, the pyramids have been plundered of all their wealth.

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Meroe Pyramids 12
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

The pyramids get their name from the ancient city of Meroe, the capital of the Kingdom of Kush, an ancient African kingdom situated in what is now the Republic of Sudan.

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Meroe Pyramids 13
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Renewed restoration and preservation efforts are under way. Still, visitors leave their mark, etching their names into bricks.

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Meroe Pyramids 14
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Renewed restoration and preservation efforts are under way. Still, visitors leave their mark, etching their names into bricks.

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Meroe Pyramids 15
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

Between 1800 and 1870, Italian explorer Giuseppe Ferlini smashed the top of 40 pyramids to get to their treasure.

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Meroe Pyramids 16
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

'This is our history. Here our ancestors are buried,' said Abdullah who lives in Al Tarabil village, a few kilometres away from the site of the pyramids.

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Meroe Pyramids 17
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

What the Italian explorer Giuseppe Ferlini discovered after smashing the top of 40 pyramids was taken back to British and German museums.

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Meroe Pyramids 18
Meroe
By sorinfurcoi
28 Mar 2015

The pyramids are located northeast of Sudan near the river Nile.

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Drowning Civilizations: Turkey Dams T...
Halfeti and Hasankeyf, Turkey
By Ibrahim Karci
01 Mar 2015

February 2015
Halfeti and Hasankeyf, Turkey

The ancient village of Hasankeyf, located in southeast Turkey is said to be one of the oldest continually inhabited settlements in the world. Situated on the banks of the Tigris river, this picturesque village has settlement activity and artifacts pre-dating the Mesopotamian era. However, in 2015, that history, and the entire village, is set to be drowned when South West Anatolia (GAP) Dam project activates its latest installment and creates a large water reservoir that will engulf the village.

The villages inhabitants have been fighting the Turkish government for years, trying to cling onto their ancestral lands. However, it looks like their struggle is coming to an unsuccessful end and they are set to be relocated to a newly built village overlooking the old one.

If government plans move forward, Hasankeyf will face the same fate of the village of Halfeti, another ancient town located nearby on the Euphrates river. Halfeti's homes and ruins are now buried under the water reservoir of the Birecik Dam, also part of the GAP project. With the villages traditional livelihoods all but erased, the inhabitants have abandoned agriculture in place of lake tourism and moved to new homes either nearby or in the cities.

This story profiles the contemporary struggle of Hasankeyf through the eyes of one of its inhabitants. It also foreshadows the possible future for Hasankeyf by visiting the village of Halfeti, which has already been submerged by dam waters.

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Amenhotep III
Luxor City
By stringersnewsagency LLC.
27 Feb 2015

Statue of Amenhotep III has been placed up again in Luxor City for the first time after 3000 years

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Iraqi Assyrians Denounce ISIS Transgr...
Erbil
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
23 Feb 2015

Opinions of Assyrians in Erbil, Iraq about the abduction of 150 Assyrians in Syria and the destruction of historical artifacts in Mosul.

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Digging for Antiquities in Rural Aleppo
Syria
By Anwar Mohamed
30 Nov 2014

Aleppo, Syria
November 30, 2014

An intimate look into the daily lives of several young men scrounging for objects of archaeological value in the countryside of Aleppo province, Syria. Though both the interviewed men and the specific area in which they are digging for archaeological remnants remain unknown and anonymous, the men delve into their motives for unearthing whatever objects they can find: first to support themselves and second, to support the revolution. To do so, they must contact potential buyers in Turkey (who serve as middle men for selling further abroad); locate particular objects of value; avoid digging in areas under control of rival groups, factions and parties; and avoid the ploys of other smugglers and diggers to keep them from locating certain valuable objects (by using decoys).

Soundbites

(Arabic, man) (01:24-01:29) We're very poor, so poor that we cannot even afford bread. That is the situation of each person who works in artifacts.

(Arabic, man) (04:21-04:31) We are hoping to find gold, so we can use it to support the revolution. We have been here for three days.

(Arabic, man) (04:32-04:39) We are here to look for gold because we do not have work, or anything.

(Arabic, man) (04:40-06:22) Interviewer: if you find gold, what do you do with it?

We export it to Turkey, and then there are people in Turkey who sell it to other countries.

Interviewer: what do you wish to do with gold or artifacts if you find any?

I wish to use them to improve our living conditions, to support the revolution, and to help those poor families who cannot even afford food. Personally, for myself, I wish to buy a house, help my family and help all the poor. Half of the people here are not working. We want to support them and support the FSA.

Interviewer: when you find artifacts and sell them, don't you feel guilty that you are taking something which is not yours and selling it?

Those things do not belong to anyone, we dig and work for months and hardly get anything, so I do not think it is wrong, and these are old things.

We are working very hard to get them; previously we weren't able to drill, but here it is easier. The FSA are good people, but when the regime was in control, we could not do this work because whoever got caught would be executed.

(Arabic, man) (06:31-06:37) The tools that we use are very basic, the shovel, the fork and other similar tools

(Arabic, man) (06:50-07:30) We have been working very hard for three months to find gold or artifacts, and until now, have found nothing. We hope to improve our situation, maybe buy a house or a car, because our current situation is very bad, and maybe we can help the poor.

(Arabic, man) (09:15-10:52) We took pictures of this statue and sent it to foreign merchants, but they were not interested. They said they wanted the treasury that contains the gold. However, we cannot get the treasury because it is buried in a mountain where we cannot go, it is an area controlled by a certain party. They saw the picture and did not want it. They wanted the gold. They told us that they used to place statues like that so that when someone found it, he would think it was the treasure and would stop searching for the gold. They did not want it, they wanted the gold.

(Arabic, man) (10:55-11:57) I am Abu Omar, I work with an archeologist, we found this in a grotto, this is a part of a mosaic floor, it is about 2000 years old. We do not have told to take out properly, so it broke into many pieces. This can be sold for almost 50,000$, but now after it all broke. it is no longer worth anything.