Frame 0004
Beekeeping From Passion to Profession
Giza
By Silhouette Production House
26 Apr 2016

His passion for beekeeping made Mahmoud Abdul Nasser, 32, the most famous beekeeper in the Egyptian city of Giza.

Unlike the majority of young men of his age, Mahmoud who graduated from high school in Cairo at the age of 17, did not want attend college to continue his education. Instead, he decided to head back to his hometown in Giza, and start a beekeeping business on his father’s farm.

“My story with bees began when I found a beehive on a tree, I put it in a box but the bees flew away.. so I went to a beekeeper and bought three beehives which I used for training. Some of the bees flew away but then I managed to keep the others. I also started to visit experienced beekeepers to watch how they work. I did some free work for them, although they offered me money, but all I wanted is to learn.”

Over 15 years, Mahmoud was able to turn beekeeping from a passion to a profession.

“To me bees are beautiful and enjoyable and I love dealing with them. People get scared of bees because they sting, but it is a beautiful insect and very productive and beneficial to humans.”

Frame 0004
Indonesia in the Heart of Cairo
Cairo
By Silhouette Production House
19 Apr 2016

Cairo’s Al-Azhar University attracts many students from Asian countries including Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore and China who come for Islamic studies as well as secular subjects.
Most of the students live in the Nasr City district where some establish small businesses to earn money to pay for their education.
Ardy Manda Putra is one of these students. He arrived in Cairo a year ago from Indonesia and joined a few friends to open a small Indonesian restaurant. He goes to classes three days a week and works at the restaurant every Thusrday, where he earns two hundred Egyptian pounds per month.
Ardy wants to complete a masters degree before returning to his homeland to serve as an Islamic preacher.

Frame 0004
Wherever They Are, We Are
Beirut
By b.yaacoub
19 Jun 2015

The image of the masked protestor, with their fiery eyes and fist in the air is one of the most iconic images in popular culture. This character has become romanticized, demonized, idolized, and oftentimes misunderstood. The upheaval that has taken place around the world, especially in the last four years, has both reinforced and broken this stereotype.

But who are those who take to the streets? Why do they do it? What do they want?

A procession of women in Nigeria, marching together with placards reading “Bring Back Our Girls”, has a considerably different tone than the charged clashes between riot police and anarchists in Greece. A candlelight vigil held by journalists in Lebanon in solidarity with Charlie Hebdo does not have the same risk of deadly violence as villagers and farmers confronting trigger-happy gunmen in Syria. And a group of concerned citizens voicing their discontent with the privatization of a public beach does not have the same high social and political stakes as those trying to overthrow an authoritarian regime.

However, despite vast differences in context and situation, those who take to the streets often share a common drive to stand up for ideas they believe in. For many, there is a common belief that by taking to the streets and making their voices public, they can influence change in their world.

Thumb sm
A New Queen Discovered in Egypt
Saqqarah
By Florencemassena
21 May 2015

At Saqqara, the site of Abu Sir has been closed to the public for two years for rehabilitation. Meanwhile, a team of Czech archaeologists has unearthed a funerary complex composed of several tombs and pyramids. The latest discovery to date is the tomb of Queen Khentkaus III, a kind of missing link of the Fifth Dynasty, which may fill the gaps in archeologists' knowledge of the Fourth and Fifth Pharaonic Dynasties. With the researcher Jaromir Krejci, we were able to access this site, still not accessible to the public, and that still holds many secrets.

Pictures by Vinciane Jacquet

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

 

Une nouvelle reine découverte en Egypte

A Saqqarah, le site d'Abou Sir est fermé depuis deux ans au public pour réhabilitation. Pendant ce temps, une équipe d'archéologues tchèques a mis à jour un complexe funéraire regroupant plusieurs tombes et pyramides. La dernière découverte en date est celle de la tombe de la reine Khentkaus III,une sorte de chaînon manquant de la cinquième dynastie, qui permet de combler les lacunes sur les connaissances de la quatrième et cinquième dynasties. Avec le chercheur Jaromir Krejci, nous avons pu accéder à ce site encore non accessible au public, et qui livre encore bien des secrets.

Photographies de Vinciane Jacquet

ARTICLE COMPLET DISPONIBLE SUR DEMANDE

Frame 0004
Armenian-Egyptians Commemorate 'Genoc...
Cairo
By Mohamed AbouElenen
23 Apr 2015

Cairo, Egypt
April 23, 2015

Egyptians of Armenian descent commemorated the centenary anniversary of the massacres committed against their ancestors by the Ottoman Empire in the First World War. Dozens of spectators examined photographs, artifacts and books that tell the story of the mass killings in 1915 as well as the Armenian diaspora around the world. The exhibition was organized by The Armenian Club in Cairo.

The Armenian community in Egypt, which was formed mainly of people who fled the killings by Ottoman Turks, dwindled in the 1950s, as many non-Arabs left the country under the weight of nationalization policies conducted by President Gamal Abdel Nasser. Around 8,000 Armenians live in Egypt today according to an interviewed activist.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of young women in traditional Armenian garbs
Various of spectators examining artefacts that belonged to Armenian refugees
Various of event attendees eating traditional Armenian snacks

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Garen Garbouyan, A young Armenian-Egyptian taking part in commemoration
00:30 – 01:14
“This event is being held because April 24 is nearing. This year is the 100th anniversary of the genocide. On this occasion, we are holding several consecutive events. In this celebration, we are introducing people to the old four Arminian provinces. We are showing how people used to dress in each province, as well as what people there used to eat and the activities they did. I am here today because my ancestors fled the massacre and came by boats to Port Said.”

Various of embroidered artefacts
Tilt down of icon with inscription in Armenian

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Marlo Zamanian, Armenian-Egyptian attending the exhibition

01:35 – 01:52
“My mother’s grandfather was forced to flee in 1915. He fled the massacres; his parents were able to flee the massacres and eventually reached Egypt.”

Various/ Close-up of artefacts
Wide of spectator examining a poster
Close-up/ Zoom out of necklace
Various of map featuring the massacres against Armenians
Various of exhibited items

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Marlo Zamanian, Armenian-Egyptian attending the exhibition
02:41 – 03:16
“My mother says that her father used to say… [LAUGH] that on a day in April – on April 24, 1915 – that the Turks knocked on their door. They come from a province called Kharpet. The Turks knocked on their door and took my mother’s grandfather who never returned. They took him to an unknown location. This was their end. My mother’s grandmother was able to rescue her children. She had a boy and two girls. She was able to leave and take them with her.”

Various of photographs depicting people who were killed in the massacres
Various of exhibition items and photographs

Close-up of a comb. NAT Sound (Arabic) 03:56 – 04:04
“This is from 1909. Look at the design.”

Wide of two girls wearing traditional costumes and holding a metal artefact

Close-up of metal artefact. NAT Sound (Arabic) 04:09 – 04:14
"This is the goblet I was talking about. It was used to fill water.” Close-up pf traditional puppet

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Marlo Zamanian, Armenian-Egyptian attending the exhibition
04:21 – 04:42
“We thank Egypt as well as the entire Arab homeland. This was the closest area to us, the [Armenian] migrants. From the desert of Deir al-Zor, we entered Syria and Lebanon. Other people fled to Greece. I feel that Arab countries were more welcoming towards than Europe.”

Various of event attendees having traditional snacks
Various of books about the Armenian genocide

Cutaways of Armen Mazloumian, An Egyptian-Armenian activist working on commemorating the Armenian genocide

SOUNDBITE Armen Mazloumian, An Egyptian-Armenian activist working on commemorating the Armenian genocide
05:29 – 06:23
“My grandfather’s family was a leading a decent life in Turkey. They were among the prominent merchants who traded in figs and pureblood horses in Turkey. His father and brothers were all killed in the massacres. He was young and another family smuggled him to Greece. In Greece, he worked for several years at the harbour with Onassis. As you know, Onassis became one of the world’s billionaires. Afterwards, my grandfather came to Egypt where lived and worked. He owned Nassibian film studio.”

Cutaways of Armen Mazloumian, An Egyptian-Armenian activist working on commemorating the Armenian genocide

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Armen Mazloumian, An Egyptian-Armenian activist working on commemorating the Armenian genocide
06:24 – 06:48
“Currently, about 8,000 Armenians live in Egypt. Their number was more than 50,000 during the 1940s and 1950s, but most of them immigrated to Armenia -- they returned to Armenia – as well as Europe, America and Australia.”

Cutaways of Viken Gezmiziyan, The head of the Armenian Charitable Society in Cairo

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Viken Gezmiziyan, The head of the Armenian Charitable Society in Cairo
06:56 – 07:10
“The method to slaughter [Armenians] is the same as the one that is being deployed by ISIS. They were lined up and killed with knives. The target was extermination; to make that area devoid of Armenians.”

Cutaways of Viken Gezmiziyan, The head of the Armenian Charitable Society in Cairo

Wide of man contemplating ‘Genocide Map’

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Viken Gezmiziyan, The head of the Armenian Charitable Society in Cairo
07:25 – 07:50
“There are about 3 million people living in present-day Armenia, while 9 million [Armenians] live outside. These 9 million did not appear out of nowhere. Our ancestors fled Armenia, and therefore Armenians were displaced in the entire world. Yet, some say that the massacres did not take place. Each one of us Armenians has a story to tell and knows how his grandfather fled the massacres. We see this as a problem.”

Cutaways of Mohamad Rifaat al-Imam, Head of History Department at the University of Damanhour

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mohamad Rifaat al-Imam, Head of History Department at the University of Damanhour
08:06 – 08:47

“The Armenian issue surfaced in 1878, as a result of Article 61 of the treaty of Berlin, which stipulated the implementation of reforms in ‘Armenistan’, or Ottoman Armenia in eastern Anatolia. Ottoman authorities refused to carry out these reforms. Armenians then had to resort to revolutionary action to pressure Europe and the Ottoman Empire to implement Article 61.”

Cutaways of Mohamad Rifaat al-Imam, Head of History Department at the University of Damanhour

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mohamad Rifaat al-Imam, Head of History Department at the University of Damanhour
09:11 – 09:43
“If Turkey to recognizes the massacres, it would have to return eastern Anatolia as well as all the funds, the assets and real estates that were confiscated from Armenians. Turkey would have to spend huge amounts of money as indemnities to the Armenian people who succumbed to a genocide, which the entire world is heading to recognize.”

Frame 0004
Egyptian Villages Suffer From Water P...
Cairo
By Mohamed AbouElenen
03 Apr 2015

The Egyptian village of Qalioub al-Balad has suffered from severe water pollution over the past three years. The water in the village has a putrid smell and is contaminated with impurities. To help tackle this issue, a resident of the village installed a private water treatment station, which he called 'The Popular Filter'.
This project is facing a crackdown from the local authorities, which have given monopoly on exploiting water resources to a private corporation.
Qalioub al-Balad is located in Qalioubiya, one of the three provinces of the Greater Cairo region.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of Qalioub al-Balad residents buying water from mobile water tank

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ahmed Nasser, Qalioub al-Balad Resident
01:40 – 02:16

“The water that comes from the tap is yellow. It used to be clean and filtered but now sometimes it comes out yellow. If you fill a glass with tap water you will see how unclean it is. We buy water, even though it is expensive, but it is better than tap water which causes kidney failure.”

Various of water distribution in the town

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mohamad Sabri, water distributor
02:35

“Before work, we clean the water hose then fill it and distribute water. We go out on a tricycle to distribute water. Each area has a specific day.” “Sometimes the Ministry of Supply inspectors come across me. I was fined before, and the only reason was that I was distributing water. The inspector took my name and started a problem. There is lawsuit still being pursued at court.” “The problem with the water is not only how it looks; some people say to me ‘I swear that I am disgusted to use the water for prayer. If it is used for cooking, the food will have a very bad smell. This is causing problems at homes.” Close-up of man filling glass with tap water
Various of Mohamad Sabri selling filtered water in the street
Various/ Close-up of plastic containers being filled with filtered water
Medium of Hasan Shaarawi, a Qalioub al-Balad resident, filling glass with tap water

SOUNDBITE (Man, Arabic) Hasan Shaarawi, a resident of Qalioub al-Balad
04:46 – 04:50

“Half of the water is black and the lower half has impurities.”

Medium of Hasan Shaarawi comparing tap water and filtered water

SOUNDBITE (Man, Arabic) Hasan Shaarawi, a resident of Qalioub al-Balad
04:58 – 05:56

“The water that the municipality is providing for us cannot be used. It is black and has a lot of a high amount of impurities. A while ago, I met someone from a company that sells water filters. They install filters and maintain them for a year. He tested the filtered water that I buy as well as the tap water. He said that the water that the municipality provides cannot be used for animals, let alone humans.” “I buy drinking water for 20 pounds a week, which we use for drinking and cooking. We use the water provided by the municipality for cleaning. The [price of tap water] went up. It is provided by private holding company. A household uses about 70 pounds worth of tap water every two months, but we do not drink it.”

Various of man distributing water

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Amal Mohammad, Resident of Qalioub al-Balad
06:02 – 06:11
“We were suffering from microbes, urinary infections and [kidney] aches because we used to drink tap water. We were told that this was because of the water. This is why we buy water. We do not drink tap water.”

Various of people buying filtered water

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Safaa Hussein, Resident of Qalioub al-Balad
06:12 – 06:27

“The problem with water is that is not clean. Some people have had diseases and kidney stones in the bile because of the water pollution. Doctors have said that the water is not clean.”

Various of Mohamad Sabri setting up tricycle motorbike and going into water treatment station

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ahmad Shubrawi, the founder the Popular Filter
06:38 – 07:09

"This tank contains regular water. This [filter] is made of pebbles, and this one from carbon. The sand and pebbles removes impurities and carbon is needed to treat the salts in the water – this is for the excess salts in the water. These two filters provide additional cleaning. Water is then exposed to something called ultraviolet’ or ‘UV’, which is the last phase that water goes through to be treated from bacteria."

Various of water treatment plant

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Ahmad Shubrawi, the founder the Popular Filter
07:16 – 10:09

“Many people have complained how the water smells and tastes, until we started this project, with the help of God. We asked how to filter water. Some people cannot afford to buy small filters to use them at home, which is why we started this water treatment station. The problem is that the government refused to give us a license. How will I be able to get a license? Can I say to the government: ‘Your water is not clean, therefore I will clean it and sell it?’” “We brought an engineer who is specialised in building water treatment facilities. We first analysed the water to know what is needed to purify it. We analysed the water provided by the government at a laboratory called Burj al-Arab to figure out the equipment or substances that we need – whether the water has excess iron or bacteria; any substances that are present in excessive amounts. Based on that, we started this treatment and we have working for three years.” “This project is a substitute for government [services]. We are relieving the government. If we shut down, people will not stay quiet. People have found an alternative. When we asked for a license the government refused to grant it to us. From time to time, the Ministry of Supply inspectors fine us because we do not have any license. You know that we do not have a license. They just file random report against us for not having a license. You should give us a permit.” “The water that we sell is more affordable to people than buying a filter. Filters that perform seven-step purification have a short life and their maintenance is costly. A filter costs about 1,500 to 1,600 pounds if it has a good quality. If you buy water from me…in the summer, a family of four to five members would use about three jerry cans a week. Each jerry costs four pounds, so this is a total of 12 pounds. Four pounds include home delivery, but if a customer picks it up from here, it could cost 2.5 pounds. Not all customers come here because it would cost them the same as the price that includes the delivery charge. A family of four to five members would buy water for 12 pounds a week – multiplied by four, that would be 48 pounds, let us say 50 pounds per month and 600 pounds per year. A home filter costs 1,500 pounds and would last for two years even if it was maintained. The motor could be burned and the pipes could be clogged. This is why people prefer to buy [filtered] water.”

Various of water treatment facility
Various of The Qalioubiya water company headquarters
Various of Mustafa Mujahid, Head of the Qalioubia water company

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mustafa Mujahid, Head of the Qaliyoubia water company
11:09 – 13:33

“[Private] water treatment companies are spreading information among people that the water provided by the Qalioubiya Potable Water and Sewage Company is not good. The water that they are using could be our own purified water. They are making a profit from this. They are pushing people to be suspicious of the water quality. I can confirm before you and to all citizens in Qalioubiya that the water we produce does not suffer from the slightest problem. The problem we are facing is the lack of water, which is affecting citizens. The building of water stations is still ongoing in order to cover the large population’s needs. The recent transgressions have also had a negative role.
Conditions specify that in order to obtain a license for a private station, the authorities that provide related services need to be consulted. The authorities in this case are the water company. Some people have started to cooperate with us and followed the law. On the other hand, we shut many businesses down and some people work illegally and do not consult with us at all.
As I told you at the beginning, these stations are only installed in deprived areas, where water is not potable. People have installed manual water pumps, which extract water from our own network. If you analyse the water that is being extracted by these pumps you will find that it is pure and conforms to standards. People extract water illicitly from the grid in order to avoid paying fees. Water is being stolen on a large scale.”

Thumb sm
Saqqara and Giza 01
Saqqara, Egypt
By Vinciane Jacquet
25 Mar 2015

25 mars 2015. Saqqara, Le Caire, Egypte. La quatrième tombe doit toujours être fouillée, ce qui permettrait de parvenir a des résultats archéologiques finaux.

March 25, 2015. Saqqara, Cairo, Egypt. The fourth grave still must be searched, which would help complete the final archaeological findings.

Thumb sm
Saqqara and Giza 02
Saqqara, Egypt
By Vinciane Jacquet
25 Mar 2015

25 mars 2015. Saqqara, Le Caire, Egypte. Elle fait partie d'une nécropole de trois tombes attenantes a la pyramide du Roi Nyuserre (2445-2421 avant J-C), reliée a celle d'un officiel, et serait probablement sa femme, la mere de son successeur le Roi Menkauhor, enterre au Nord de Saqqara.

March 25, 2014. Saqqara, Cairo, Egypt. It is part of a necropolis of three adjacent graves at the pyramid of King Nyuserre (2445-2421 BC), connected to an official's one, and would probably be his wife, the mother of his successor King Menkauhor, buried in Northern Saqqara.

Thumb sm
Saqqara and Giza 03
Saqqara, Egypt
By Vinciane Jacquet
25 Mar 2015

25 mars 2015. Saqqara, Le Caire, Egypte. Les archéologues ont découvert une inscription sur la tombe : "Femme du Roi et mère du Roi". Cela permettrait aux chercheurs de combler un vide dans la connaissance de l'Histoire de l'Ancien Royaume.

March 25, 2015. Saqqara, Cairo, Egypt. The archaeologists discovered an inscription on the tomb: "Wide of the King and mother of King". This would enable researchers to fill a gap in the knowledge of the History of the Old Kingdom.

Thumb sm
Saqqara and Giza 04
Saqqara, Egypt
By Vinciane Jacquet
25 Mar 2015

25 mars 2015. Saqqara, Le Caire, Egypte. La tombe de la reine Khentkaus III, appartenant a la cinquième dynastie, a été découverte a l'automne 2014 par une équipe d'archéologues tchèques sur le site d'Abou Sir, a 25 km au Sud-Ouest du Caire, dans le site historique de Saqqara.

March 25, 2015. Saqqara, Cairo, Egypt. The tomb of Queen Khentkaus III, belonging to the Fifth Dynasty, was discovered in the fall of 2014 by a team of Czech archaeologists at the site of Abu Sir, 25km southwest of Cairo, on Saqqara's historical site.

Thumb sm
Saqqara and Giza 05
Saqqara, Egypt
By Vinciane Jacquet
25 Mar 2015

25 mars 2015. Saqqara, Le Caire, Egypte. La tombe inachevée du Roi Neferefre (2419-2416 avant J-C) a été découverte en 1994.

March 25, 2015. Saqqara, Cairo, Egypt. The unfinished tomb of King Neferefre (2419-2416 BC) was discovered in 1994.

Thumb sm
Saqqara and Giza 07
Saqqara, Egypt
By Vinciane Jacquet
25 Mar 2015

25 mars 2015. Saqqara, Le Caire, Egypte. Elle fait partie d'une necropole de trois tombes attenantes a la pyramide du Roi Nyuserre (2445-2421 avant J-C), reliee a celle d'un officiel, et serait probablement sa femme, la mere de son successeur le Roi Menkauhor, enterre au Nord de Saqqara.

March 25, 2014. Saqqara, Cairo, Egypt. Part of a necropolis of three adjacent graves at the pyramid of King Nyuserre (2445-2421 BC is connected to an official's one, probabaly that of his wife, the mother of his successor King Menkauhor, buried in Northern Saqqara.

Thumb sm
Saqqara and Giza 06
Saqqara, Egypt
By Vinciane Jacquet
25 Mar 2015

25 mars 2015. Saqqara, Le Caire, Egypte. La tombe inachevee du Roi Neferefre (2419-2416 avant J-C) a ete decouverte en 1994.

March 25, 2015. Saqqara, Cairo, Egypt. The unfinished tomb of King Neferefre (2419-2416 BC) was discovered in 1994.

Frame 0004
Inside Look: Syrian Refugees Imprison...
Alexandria, Egypt
By hoda zakaria
24 Mar 2015

March 22, 2015
Alexandria, Egypt

A group of Syrian refugees who attempted to smuggle themselves illegally by what they call the "boats of death" from Turkey to Italy have been detained by Egyptian police and sent to Karmouz prison in Alexandria. The refugees who fled from the civil war in Syria, set off from the Turkish port town of Mersin on September 23, 2014. The boat's engine stopped in Egyptian waters leaving them adrift. They spent 7 days floating in the sea with little food or water before they were picked up by the Egyptian coast guard on September 30, 2014, and brought back to Alexandria.

These photos and videos were taken in the Alexandrian prison on March 22, 2015. They show how the refugees are living their daily lives inside the prison where the prison warden has allowed them to have laptops and mobile phones. According to the refugees who declined to give their names, there are 74 Syrians and Syrian-Palestinians who are being detained in this prison, including 15 children and 8 women. They were all victims of human trafficking. 

In the videos two men describe the ordeal of the refugees and their desperation. One of the men asked that his face be obscured.

Frame 0004
Syrian Refugee Imprisoned in Egypt
Alexandria, Egypt
By hoda zakaria
22 Mar 2015

A group of Syrian refugees who attempted to smuggle themselves illegally by what they call the "boats of death" from Turkey to Italy have been detained by Egyptian police and sent to Karmouz prison in Alexandria. The refugees who fled from the civil war in Syria, set off from the Turkish port town of Mersin on September 23, 2014. The boat's engine stopped in Egyptian waters leaving them adrift. They spent 7 days floating in the sea with little food or water before they were picked up by the Egyptian coast guard on September 30, 2014, and brought back to Alexandria.

These photos and videos were taken in the Alexandrian prison on March 22, 2015. They show how the refugees are living their daily lives inside the prison where the prison warden has allowed them to have laptops and mobile phones. According to the refugees who declined to give their names, there are 74 Syrians and Syrian-Palestinians who are being detained in this prison, including 15 children and 8 women. They were all victims of human trafficking.

In the videos two men describe the ordeal of the refugees and their desperation. One of the men asked that his face be obscured.

Transcription:

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man)
1min 35 sec
“We left Syria around a year ago. After several attempts, we after traveling reached Egypt in the sea for seven days. We almost died in the middle of the sea because the boat broke down. We suffered a lot. We lost drinking water, luggage and food. A baby who was with us on the boat died. The Egyptian navy arrested us on September 30, 2014. Until this day, we have been detained in Karmouz prison. We were transferred to different prisoners. There is not any country that will receive us because we do not have documents. The only country that would receive us is Syria. However, we cannot return to Syria. All human rights organizations have talked with us, but they have given us false promises. We do not have any hope. I also have a personal suffering. I lost my wife, son and brother in another journey, during which the boat drowned. My psychological situation is very bad. We are suffering a lot.
We hope that you… we urge all the officials in Egypt or any other country as well as the [United Nations] to help us to travel to Europe, which was our initial destination.”

Thumb sm
Syrian Refugees Imprisoned in Egypt 1
Alexandria, Egypt
By hoda zakaria
22 Mar 2015

A Syrian refugee washes his plate in his cell in the Karmouz prison, Alexandria

Thumb sm
Syrian Refugees Imprisoned in Egypt 3
Alexandria, Egypt
By hoda zakaria
22 Mar 2015

A Syrian refugee washes his plate in the Karmouz prison, Alexandria.

Thumb sm
Syrian Refugees Imprisoned in Egypt 4
Alexandria, Egypt
By hoda zakaria
22 Mar 2015

A Syrian refugee hangs out his washing in his cell in the Karmouz prison.

Thumb sm
Syrian Refugees Imprisoned in Egypt 5
Alexandria, Egypt
By hoda zakaria
22 Mar 2015

A Syrian refugee prepares a meal inside the Karmouz prison.

Thumb sm
Syrian Refugees Imprisoned in Egypt 6
Alexandria, Egypt
By hoda zakaria
22 Mar 2015

One Syrian refugee stands on another's shoulders to fix the light in their cell.

Thumb sm
Syrian Refugees Imprisoned in Egypt 8
Alexandria, Egypt
By hoda zakaria
22 Mar 2015

A Syrian child sleeps in a cell inside the Karmouz prison.

Thumb sm
Syrian Refugees Imprisoned in Egypt 11
Alexandria, Egypt
By hoda zakaria
22 Mar 2015

A Syrian refugee prepares a meal inside his cell in the Karmouz prison.

Thumb sm
Syrian Refugees Imprisoned in Egypt 12
Alexandria, Egypt
By hoda zakaria
22 Mar 2015

The communal cell of the detained Syrian refugees. The prison warden has allowed them access to mobile phones and laptops.

Frame 0004
Syrian Refugee Imprisoned in Egypt
Alexandria, Egypt
By hoda zakaria
22 Mar 2015

A group of Syrian refugees who attempted to smuggle themselves illegally by what they call the "boats of death" from Turkey to Italy have been detained by Egyptian police and sent to Karmouz prison in Alexandria. The refugees who fled from the civil war in Syria, set off from the Turkish port town of Mersin on September 23, 2014. The boat's engine stopped in Egyptian waters leaving them adrift. They spent 7 days floating in the sea with little food or water before they were picked up by the Egyptian coast guard on September 30, 2014, and brought back to Alexandria.

These photos and videos were taken in the Alexandrian prison on March 22, 2015. They show how the refugees are living their daily lives inside the prison where the prison warden has allowed them to have laptops and mobile phones. According to the refugees who declined to give their names, there are 74 Syrians and Syrian-Palestinians who are being detained in this prison, including 15 children and 8 women. They were all victims of human trafficking.

In the videos two men describe the ordeal of the refugees and their desperation. One of the men asked that his face be obscured.

Transcription:

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Syrian held in Karmouz Turkish prison
55 sec.
“Peace be upon you. Our story started when we left Syria. We fled war and destruction, in search of decent life. We headed to the Turkish city of Mersin, where we stayed for a few months waiting to travel to the Italian shores. We sailed in the Mediterranean in the so-called ‘boats of death.’ After 10 days, we were forced under the threat of arms to disembark in an Egyptian island near Alexandria called Nelson Island. We have been detained in Karmouz prison for nearly five months. Our problem cannot be solved. As we suffer from this catastrophe, we do not find any hope. We urge all international organizations and the [United Nations] human rights commission to find a solution for us and get us out of this deadlock.”

Thumb sm
Syrian refugees detained in Egypt 2
Egypt , Alexandria , police station
By Ahmed Medhat
17 Mar 2015

A young Syrian girl sleeps on the ground inside the police station in Karmooz, Alexandria.

Thumb sm
Syrian refugees detained in Egypt 8
Egypt , Alexandria
By Ahmed Medhat
17 Mar 2015

Detained Syrian women. A group of Syrian refugees have been detained in police stations in Egypt after they tried to reach Europe illegally by boat. Four years after the start of Syria’s civil war, Syrian people are still fleeing to neighboring countries looking for a safer and better life for their children.

Thumb sm
Syrian refugees detained in Egypt 7
Egypt , Alexandria , police station
By Ahmed Medhat
16 Mar 2015

Food of the detained Syrian refugees. A group of Syrian refugees have been detained in police stations in Egypt after they tried to reach Europe illegally by boat. Four years after the start of Syria’s civil war, Syrian people are still fleeing to neighboring countries looking for a safer and better life for their children.

Thumb sm
Amenhotep III
Luxor City
By stringersnewsagency LLC.
27 Feb 2015

Statue of Amenhotep III has been placed up again in Luxor City for the first time after 3000 years

Frame 0004
Egyptian Airstrikes on Derna Claim th...
Derna
By MENA Desk
16 Feb 2015

February 16, 2015
Derna, Libya

At least seven civilians including three children were killed on February 16, 2015, when Egyptian jets bombed suspected ISIS affiliates in the eastern Libyan city of Derna, Amnesty International said, citing eyewitnesses.

The video shows the airstrikes hitting Eastern Shiha, a suburb of Derna, and medics attempting to resuscitate children wounded in the airstrikes without success. It also shows civilians walking amongst the rubble of the damaged buildings.

The Egyptian airstrikes on Libyan soil are a retaliation to an ISIS video showing the beheading of 21 Egyptian Copts in Libya.

Frame 0004
Villains, Goblins and Ghouls: Cairo's...
Cairo
By Lewis
15 Feb 2015

February 7, 2015
Cairo, Eygpt

Cosplay, a portmanteau of costume and play, emerged as a popular hobby in Japan during the 1990s and quickly became a symbol of Japanese popular culture across Asia and the US. Borrowing stylistic elements of anime, comics, and gaming culture, cosplayers take on the appearance of their favorite fictional characters.

In recent months, the activity has gained significant traction in Egypt, spawning small communities from Mansoura to Alexandria and Cairo. As the 2nd edition of EgyCon commences this weekend, we will be looking at the people sharing in this new-found identity. EgyCon is the name of the cosplay convention series in Egypt whose main goal is to spread anime and manga culture throughout the country. But as Egyptian youth blur the border between fantasy and reality, what are the social impacts and challenges of engaging in cosplay in a country marked by social conservatism, growing unemployment, and political instability?

Frame 0004
Scores Killed in Egypt Football Violence
Cairo
By Mohamed AbouElenen
08 Feb 2015

February 8, 2015
Cairo, Egypt

More than 20 people were killed when a riot broke out on Sunday February 8, night outside a major football stadium in Cairo causing a stampede and fighting between police and fans, authorities said.

The bodies of victims were transported in ambulances to the Zeinhom morgue in Cairo.

The riot, three years after similar violence killed 74 people, began ahead of a match between Egyptian Premier League clubs Zamalek and ENPPI at Air Defence Stadium east of Cairo.

Egyptian authorities ordered the arrest of the leaders of the Zamalek supporters group, Ultras White Knights, according to state media.

This video includes footage of dead bodies being transported into the morgue as well as angry crowds condemning the killing of the football fans.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

  • Wide of ambulance
  • Wide of paramedics carrying dead body. NAT Sound: “Oh dear son. May your family have patience.”
  • Various of paramedics transporting dead body

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man)
01:06 – 01:21
- "We are not terrorists. It is only a false accusation. They call us terrorists. Where is the terrorism if someone was cheering [for a football team]? These are the White Knights fans and there were also the Ahli Ultras. Everyday people are dying.”

  • Wide of paramedics moving dead body inside morgue

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Men)
01:33 – 01:46
- “A man went to the stadium wearing the Zamalek jersey. He was wearing his team’s jersey and going to cheer for his team. They said that he was a terrorist. May God help us against them.”

  • "Should a man be killed if he did not have a ticket with him.”

  • Wide of crowd knocking on door through which dead body was taken

  • Various of crowd gathering and filming

Thumb sm
The Translator - أيوب البحر
Port Said
By osama kamal
06 Feb 2015

Fawzi Al Dabbousi, better known as "The Translator", left home at 10 years old. Instead of going to school he began working as a waiter in a British army base in Port Said. Seven years later, in October 1950, he joined the Egyptian resistance against the British, using information and access he had from years of working alongside the British Army, to help bring them down. 
 

بتصرف:

على حافة البحر وعند شواطئه تلتقي بأبنائه الذين منحهم قبساً من صموده، وبعضاً من تجدده وبقائه، والذين وهبتهم الشمس الرغبة في التنفس حتى رمق الهواء الأخير . أول ما رأيته لقّبته بـ”أيوب” بسبب رغبته العميقة  في الحياة رغم الثمانين عاماً التي يحملها على وجهه وكتفيه.

فوزي الدبوسي ( مواليد عام 1934) أو فوزي ياسين الدبوسي. يعتز أيمّا اعتزاز باسم والده ويصر على اضافة اسمه إليه، رغم أنه فرّ صغيراً من بيت أسرته في الاسماعيلية عام 1944. ترك منزل أسرته في سن العاشرة ناجياً بنفسه من قسوة زوجة أبيه. عمل منذ نعومة طفولته وحتى السابعة عشرة من عمره "كنادل"  داخل أحد المعسكرات الانجليزية، أو بلغة المصريين حينها "الكامب الانجليزي”. 

بعد إلغاء معاهدة عام 1936 بين مصر وبريطانيا، شارك مع الفدائيين بعمليات ضد “الاحتلال الانجليزي”.

ومن خلال عمله الطويل في البحر تعلم ١١ لغة وأتقنها فأصبح مترجماً بحرياً أو “بمبوطي” كما يسمونه في مصر.

Frame 0004
Alexandria Tram Firebombed
Alexandria
By stringersnewsagency LLC.
03 Feb 2015

February 3, 2015
Alexandria, Egypt

Muslim Brotherhood protestors set fire to a tram in Alexandria on Tuesday. The passengers fled as protestors stormed the tram and set it on fire with molotov cocktails. The attack comes one day after the sentencing of 188 Muslim Brotherhood members to death, for the killing of a policeman in 2013.

Frame 0004
Racy Egyptian Films Persist in the Fa...
Beirut
By Cherine Yazbeck
29 Jan 2015

Beirut, Lebanon

January 29, 2015

After the death of Arab film icons Faten Hamama and Sabah earlier this year, cinema fans revived the memories of what many describe as “la belle époque,” which dated from the 1950s till the mid-1970s.

During this golden age, budgets and standards were considerably high and the progressive state ideology promoted the production of films that were successful throughout the Arab world. This wave benefited from cultural interaction between different Arab societies, a seemingly endless cache of amazing talents and the blessing of a dedicated audience. More significantly, movies reflected liberal societies.

Aboudi Abu Jaoudeh, the director of Al-Furat publishing house, is a collector of Arab film posters. Through this collection, one can understand the prevailing mentality at that time. He explains that since the mid-1970s, filmmakers have steered away from showing explicit content as a result of pressure from producers from the Arabian Gulf.

A recent audiovisual performance titled Gharam wa Intiqam (Love and Revenge), designed by artist Randa Mirza and rapper Wael Kodaih, known as Rayess Beik, revives Arab cinema’s golden era. The show, which is still running in alternative venues, incorporates electronic music into scenes from some of the most iconic Egyptian, Lebanese, and Syrian movies.

This video includes an interview with Sadek Sabbah, a famous Lebanese cinema producer and distributor of Egyptian and Lebanese movies whose company, Sabbah Art Production, was a main contributor of cinematic production in the 1960s and 1970s. He analyses how social change in Egypt has affected the movies and discusses the influence of Islamists on public freedom in Egypt.

Shotlist and Transcript

1 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Abboudi Abou Jawdeh, Director of Al-Furat Publishing House
00:00 – 01:17
I am focusing my interest on Lebanese cinema. I want to archive [the relevant material] accurately.
I love this poster. It features Sabah. Many posters were inspired by Western ones. This one was shows an influence of the movie Gilda, starred by Rita Hayworth. They have reproduced the exact same poster in Lebanon.
When James Bond movies were out, there were spy movies in Lebanon, too. When musical films were produced abroad, musicals were also produced [in Lebanon]. The same trends that appeared in the 1970s… When erotic movies were produced, the same took place in Arab countries and Lebanon between 1970 and 1972 or 1973. The same trends in world or Arab cinema were echoed [in Lebanon]. These trends had a worldwide effect. This includes all aspects [of cinema], from designing poster to producing the movie. This also affected people’s lives.

2 Various of Abboudi Abou Jawdeh examining posters

3 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Abboudi Abou Jawdeh, Director of Al-Furat Publishing House

01:31 – 08:18

01:31
This movie… this poster dates from the 1940s. This is how they designed posters.
In the 1970s and 1980s – the late 1970s and early 1980s – especially when video and new technology appeared, people were able to take movies to their homes. At that time, funding from Saudi Arabia or the Gulf in general was channeled into production. This funding forced its own requirements on production. It imposed certain limits. There was a large-scale consumption of cinematic work, or movies in general, through new broadcasting media; there were new TV stations as well as video.
This financial capital bought a large part of old movies and financed new movies. It laid down new models for work. For example, [investors] require that certain scenes or topics do not appear. There were certain molds that had to contain these movies. Movies that were produced until the 1970s were modified to suit the new display rules. All the kisses were removed from movies, as well as all scenes that were deemed unacceptable. Movies that are being currently shown and that were produced in 1950s, 1960s and 1970s are disfigured.
It was a rare for a director to be able to take control of his own movie. Even earlier, in the 1950s and 1960s, there were directors who suffered in their work and their movies were even censored. They used to be paid per movie. They would receive a certain fee, for example 6,000 or 7,000 Egyptian pounds and would not ask about the movie later. Some producers were in need of money.
I started collecting… one usually has a favorite actor or actresses. I started collecting their photos and posters. After the show, I used to ask workers in the movie theater if there were any posters [that I could take]. I started collecting posters of Western movies. I continued this collection, and later I was interested in cinema magazines, especially in the 1970s… in the early 1970s. Cinema was the main source of entertainment in Lebanon at that time. People from all social classes used to go at least five or six times a year to the movie theater.
When she [Um Kulthum] died, they filmed her funeral and showed part of that footage [in the cinema].
Al-Haram (The Sin) was a movie produced in 1968. It was based on a novel by Youssef Idriss. It is a beautiful story about a female peasant who was a raped by another peasant and did not dare to say anything about it. She did not even tell her husband about this. She died while giving birth. This story is very tragic and can really be described as a story with a social interest. It shows women’s suffering in our Arab societies.
The changes… now there are restrictions that actors, directors, or producers apply to avoid being held accountable. It is not the people who would hold them accountable. [A producer would say,] “I have paid one or two million dollars to produce a TV series; I do not want the government to ban it if I did not remove this or that part.” Producers avoid any trouble to be able to make a profit.
06:42
This poster was designed by artist Hilmi al-Touni. I think that it expresses very beautifully what the movie is about. All the black color… the background represents death while she represents life. The movie’s illustration is done beautifully.
07: 13
Look at this poster. Imagine that this poster was printed in 1955. This is one of the first movies starred by Hind Rustom.
This kind of magazines was printed in Lebanon in 1960s and even in the 1970s. This magazine was distributed in Arab countries. It is called Cinema and Marvels. It was indeed a marvelous magazine!
Interviewer: Do you think it would be possible for such magazines to be printed again in the Arab world?
- No, it is not possible. Some of [these models] were Arab. You would be able to find Arab dancers on magazine covers. It was normal.

4 Various of Metro al-Madina theatre hall and cabaret

5 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Randa Mirza, Artist
08:44
“Our show is called Love and Revenge, the title of a movie starred by Asmahan in 1944. The entire show is based on replaying Arabic songs that date from the 1930s till the 1960s. It features Egyptian, Lebanese and Syrian movies from the same period.“

  1. Various of show. NAT Sound: Music.

7 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Rayyes Beik, Musician
09:25
“I wanted to revive these songs with a new spirit so that I and other people rediscover them. In remixing these songs, I incorporated electronic music. I changed the beat and the length of the songs. The song now has a new face, a new spirit.”

  1. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Randa Mirza, Artist
    09:55
    “When we return to that era, we realize that we had a great cinematographic and musical production, which had simplicity, aesthetics and experience that now have been lost. We want to bring this era back. Then we would perhaps be able to say, “See where we were and where we are now.”

9 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Rayyes Beik, Musician and Rapper
10:20
“There is a political, economic and artic void. There is a big void in the Arab world.”

10 Wide of posters in Metro al-Madina

11 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Aurelien Zouki, Spectator
10:40
It is really important that they worked on Egyptian movies. This shows our situation back then and what we have now reached. This difference is a bit scary.

12 Various of show. Scenes taken from Kaborya, starred by Ahmadn Zaki and Raghda (9:14).
Scenes feature dancer Tahiya Karioka. Soundtrack , song by Warda al-Jazairiya (11:08); Dancer Samia Jamal (11:39); scenes from film Abi Fawqa al-Shajara, starred by Abdel Halim Hafez and Samia Jamal; soundtrack, Tindam by Widad; film starred by Sleiman Eid

13 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Sadeq Sabbah, Owner of Sabbah Art Production
15:11 – 18:36

I think the change is due to the fact that people’s mindset was affected by the Islamic tide. Part of this was negative. This negative part affected people. It affected their social habits and way of life, which has to do with cinema, what they eat or drink, as well as going out. It has to do with everything. It is not specifically related to cinema. If, in Lebanon for example, I wanted to say that cinema is the mirror of society… I feel that cinema currently is not the mirror of society. If you look at 10 women in the street, you will see that nine of them wear the hijab. However, if we looked at women in Egyptian movies, the ratio would be reversed. Maybe one tenth of them wear a hijab.
Lebanon embraced Egyptian cinema approximately from 1965 to 1975. They [Egyptian filmmakers] discovered three things in Lebanon. First of all, Lebanon is a large studio where there is great scenery. There is the sea, mountains and a nice climate. Media services in Lebanon were – and still are – very distinguished. Egyptians discovered that film production was easy in Lebanon. In addition to that, there were Lebanese actors and actresses present in Lebanon, which complemented Egyptian cinema. More importantly, distribution originated in Lebanon. The distribution revenues were funneled into Lebanon, which created an economic cycle during these 10 years. This facilitated film production. I feel nostalgic about the movie Nagham fi Hayati (A Life Melody), starred by Farid al-Atrash. First of all, I followed my parents work while they produced this movie. Secondly, there was a horrible incident. Farid al-Atrash died during two days before the end of filming, but they [the crew] were able to come up with solutions. It might also have to do with the fact that this was the last movie made in Lebanon – we were talking about these movies made between 1965 and 1975. After that the war broke out. I always have this movie in mind and I always love to watch it. Also, It featured a large group of Lebanese actors, such as Shoushou. There was a large Lebanese cast in this movie. It also featured classical scenery in Lebanon, such as Baalbek, Byblos, the cable cart, which was very important back then. It also featured Tyre. It was as if there Egyptian cinema was bidding Lebanon farewell.

Frame 0004
Racy Egyptian Films No Longer Mirror ...
Beirut
By Cherine Yazbeck
29 Jan 2015

Beirut, Lebanon

January 29, 2015

After the death of Arab film icons Faten Hamama and Sabah earlier this year, cinema fans revived the memories of what many describe as “la belle époque,” which dated from the 1950s till the mid-1970s.
During this golden age, budgets and standards were considerably high and the progressive state ideology promoted the production of films that were successful throughout the Arab world. This wave benefited from cultural interaction between different Arab societies, a seemingly endless cache of amazing talents and the blessing of a dedicated audience. More significantly, movies reflected liberal societies.
Aboudi Abu Jaoudeh, the director of Al-Furat publishing house, is a collector of Arab film posters. Through this collection, one can understand the prevailing mentality at that time. He explains that since the mid-1970s, filmmakers have steered away from showing explicit content as a result of pressure from producers from the Arabian Gulf.
A recent audiovisual performance titled Gharam wa Intiqam (Love and Revenge), designed by artist Randa Mirza and rapper Wael Kodaih, known as Rayess Beik, revives Arab cinema’s golden era. The show, which is still running in alternative venues, incorporates electronic music into scenes from some of the most iconic Egyptian, Lebanese, and Syrian movies.
This video includes an interview with Sadek Sabbah, a famous Lebanese cinema producer and distributor of Egyptian and Lebanese movies whose company, Sabbah Art Production, was a main contributor of cinematic production in the 1960s and 1970s. He analyses how social change in Egypt has affected the movies and discusses the influence of Islamists on public freedom in Egypt.

Shotlist and Transcript

1 Various of Aboud Abu Jaoudeh, Director of Al-Furat Publishing House, examining film posters

2 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Aboud Abu Jaoudeh, Director of Al-Furat Publishing House

Cinema was the main source of entertainment in Lebanon at that time. People from all social classes used to go at least five or six times a year to the movie theater.
Could you imagine that this poster was printed in 1955? This is one of the first movies starred by Hind Rustom.
This kind of magazines was printed in Lebanon in 1960s and even in the 1970s. This magazine was distributed in Arab countries. It is called Cinema and Marvels. It was indeed a marvelous magazine!
Interviewer: Do you think it would be possible for such magazines to be printed again in the Arab world?
No, it is not possible

4 Various of Metro al-Madina cabaret and movie theatre

5 Wide of screen in audiovisual show Gharam wa Intiqam (Love and Revenge); scene from Kaboria, starred by Ahmad Zaki and Raghda.

6 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Rayyes Beik, Musician

“I wanted to revive these songs with a new spirit so that I and other people rediscover them.”

7 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Randa Mirza, Artist

“We want to retrieve the aesthetics and experience that now have been lost. We want to bring this era back. Then we would perhaps be able to say, ‘See where we were and where we are now.’”

8 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Rayyes Beik, Musician

“There is a political, economic and artic void. There is a big void in the Arab world.”

9 Wide of posters in Metro al-Madina

10 Various of show; Dancers Tahiya Karioka, Samia Jamal. Soundtrack, Batwannis bik by Warda al-Jazairiya

11 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Sadeq Sabbah, Owner of Sabbah Art Production

“People’s mindset was affected by the Islamic tide. Part of this was negative. This negative part affected people. It affected their social habits and way of life, which has to do with cinema, what they eat or drink, as well as going out. It has to do with everything. It is not specifically related to cinema. If, in Lebanon for example, I wanted to say that cinema is the mirror of society… I feel that cinema currently is not the mirror of society.”

Thumb sm
Marsa Alam Tourism 13
Marsa Alam
By PaoloPatruno
16 Jan 2015

Unfinished and abandoned construction site for a new Resort on the seaside in Marsa Alam.