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Kurds Mourn the Deaths of British and...
Derik, Syria
By TTM Contributor 33
14 Mar 2015

The body of Ashley Johnson, an Australian fighter in the Kurdish People Protection Units (YPG), was taken from Syria to Turkey at the Derik border crossing. Johnson, who joined the YPG six months ago, was killed on 25 February when the Kurdish militia retook the strategic town of Tal Hamis in northeast Syria from ISIS.

This video shows the procession in which Johnson’s body was taken from Syria to Turkey. It also shows the body of former British Royal Marine and Peshmerga fighter, Konstandinos Erik Scurfield, who died on March 4, being taken from a hospital in the Kurdish city of Derik to Iraqi Kurdistan through the Simalka border crossing. Scurfiled was also killed in the battle to retake Tal Hamis.

Defying ISIS- Beirut's Shia Commemora...
Beirut
By Transterra Editor
04 Nov 2014

November 4, 2014
Beirut, Lebanon

Amidst tight security, Lebanese Shia citizens defy ISIS bomb threats and participate in Ashura celebrations in Beirut's southern suburbs.

Ashura commemorates the martyrdom of Imam Hussein in the battle of Karbala in 680AD. While primarily a religious celebration, Ashura in Lebanon is highly tied to politics. This year's rally in south Beirut ended with a speech by Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah, who defended his party's military actions in Syria.

Sunni militant groups like ISIS and Nusra Front have been threatening to attack Hezbollah controlled and Shia dominant areas in Lebanon in revenge for Hezbollah's involvement in the Syrian conflict. Last year, Beirut's southern suburbs experienced a wave bombings at the hands of Nusra affiliated militants.

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'Consumer Protection' in the Islamic ...
Raqqa
By TTM Contributor 20
04 Nov 2014

November 4, 2014
Raqqa, Syria

The Islamic State "Control and Inspection Office" gather and destroy expired or illegally smuggled cosmetics, beauty products, food products, and detergents. The products were destroyed under the prerogative of consumer protection. Since seizing control of Raqqa and large areas of Syria and Iraq, the Islamic State has made a concerted effort to demonstrate an ability to govern the areas it controls.

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Inside Kobane (Video)
Kobane
By Shirwan Qasim
27 Oct 2014

Kobane, Syria

This video shows the destruction inside Kobane after weeks of ISIS siege. Conditions in the city are dire as medications are not available. All Kurdish fighters in the city are volunteers. This footage was shot on Kobane's eastern front, approximately 400 meters from the nearest ISIS position.

Male YPG Fighter:

"Nobody can beat the Kurdish population. I want to ensure the Kurds that no power can take Kobane, or evict us from Kobane. We will not allow anyone to enter our land. If we lose our land, we lose our dignity and honor."

Injured Child:

"ISIS have attacked us from the telecommunication tower. My mother and I were going to get water, and we were attacked by snipers."

A female fighter from the women protection unit of the YPG:

"I joined the women protection unit to protect my people and my country."

"The criminals who are attacking our homes, our children, and our siblings have taken everything in the city and left nothing for us. I ask all the men who left the city to return to it and defend it. I invite them to carry their weapons because each and every one of us is entitled to do something for Kobane."

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Fighter Jet Spotted Over Deir Ez Zour...
al-Mayadeen
By TTM Contributor 4
25 Sep 2014

September 26, 2014
Al-Mayadeen, Deir Ez Zour Province, Syria

Footage shows what local residents believe to be a US-led coalition fighter jet in the sky over the town of al-Mayadeen, near Deir Ez Zour in eastern Syria. Footage also shows smoke rising on the horizon from what local residents believe to be an airstrike
in the same area. Local residents have also reported seeing up to twelve reconnaissance flights overhead today.

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Farah: A Syrian Prostitute in Lebanon
Beirut
By ashgallagher
23 Jul 2014

June 2014
Hazmieh, Beirut, Lebanon

Farah is young Syrian refugee woman in Lebanon who has turned to prostitution to survive. With her father too sick to work and her brother chronically injured by a bomb in Damascus, she is the last person in her family able to make ends meet.

Currently, Syrian refugees make up 1/3 of Lebanon's population. With little to no support infrastructure in place, many refugees are forced to take desperate measures to make ends meet. Among some of the last ditch options is prostitution. According to Lebanese authorities, %73 of prostitutes in Lebanon are Syrian. Prostitutes either work on the streets, or, like Farah, they work in so called "Super Night Clubs", which are brothels masquerading as night clubs.

TRANSCRIPT FOR NATSOT PKG:

OPENING SHOTS - BEAUTY SHOT OVER HAZMIEH,
STREET SCENE
CONSTRUCTION AREA

DIP TO BLACK

OPEN SOT / LIPS ONCAM. My name is Farah, I am from Syria.

VO OF FARAH/WALKING - OVERLAP TO ONCAM,
- FARAH (FONT: SYRIAN PROSTITUTE) : I tried to work in a normal shop, but I found this is the best way to meet my expenses.

VO OF NIGHT LIFE / HAZMIEH, JOUNYEIH SCENES
BUTT TO - I wake up around 11 and take a shower. I only get 2 hours a day to myself when I start moving and I go where I'm to be working and the customers start coming, some you know, some you don't, it's night life.

VO/NATSOUND OF UNDERCOVER CLUB -
FIXER / SOT: Where are all the hot girls?
BOUNCER: if you want hot girls, go downstairs
VO FOLLOWS DOWN STAIRS W/ CREEPY MUSIC.

DIP TO BLACK

VO OPEN/SHOW HASSAN, VO, AT THE BAR, INTRO:
--HASSAN SOT (FONT: SUPER NIGHT CLUB MANAGER) - They go up to the dance floor and the customers can see them and pick out which one they want to take for the night. BUTT TO / Syrians are out on the streets, in places that are illegal, Hazmieh, everywhere, in Lebanon, they are affecting the businesses, they don't have a place to rent or anything, We're not giving them what they deserve. BUTT TO/ If they didn't need the money, they would come here.

BREATHE VO OF THE SUPER NIGHT CLUB WALK THROUGH, WITH A GIRL CHATTING 3-4 SECONDS

[[VO - LET BREATH/SCENES, CLOSE UPS OF HER FIGURE, NIGHT LIFE VO]] SOT: Farah: Maybe they will let me leave, at the same time, maybe later, they will threaten me or do something [violent] to me

butt to SOT FARAH: It is very hard, I don't even like this.
BUTT TO - It will affect me a lot because in this society, wether Lebanese or Syrian, it affects the girl
BUTT TO -
If someone met me and he knows, what they would say about me, they wouldn't take me.

VO/NATS OF OFFICER JOSEPH MOUSALIM / ONCAM / DISPERSE WORKING VO / ON CAM / DAYSIDE ST. SCENES
SOT: Officer Joseph. Mousalim - FONT: Public relations Internal security forces.
Mostly the super night clubs are for foreigners even if there is a few Syrians there, but for the Syrian women, there is either the man comes to their homes or they are referred to someone by the man.
(butt to) SOT: OJM - In terms for human trafficking 73% of the total arrested are Syrians.

[VO OF FARAH / ON CAM, THEN VO OF HER DOING OTHER THINGS, SMOKING WALKING,]] SOT: FARAH, . : In the last year, many things have changed in my life esp when my brother lost his hand and no hospital would accept him, my father got sick, that's what I do these things, especially when my brother had to have surgery and a ligament transplant. (butt to) I have to take responsibility because I am the eldest, my brother are too young and I cannot make them go to work, they still go to school, that's why

DIP TO BLACK/DISSOLVE.

[ON CAM/MOUTH TALKING]] SOT: FARAH: I blame no one, but I wish I was born a boy, so there would be someone older than me to take responsibility. VO OUT OF FARAH WALKING, FADE OUT

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"Free Syrian Football Team
Tripoli
By ashgallagher
22 Jul 2014

June, 2014
Tripoli, Lebanon

As the war in Syria drags on, some Syrian defectors and refugees are choosing to fight with a football. Training in northern Lebanon, team members passionately follow international football teams- and now, they are determined to become the new representatives for a free Syrian national team. They are fervent in their Ramadan prayers by day and train with passion at night. We gain rare access to their world, how they live, and just how they hope to rise above the turmoil in their country through sport.

By Ashley Gallagher

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Portrait of Syrian Children in Lebanon
Qaa, Lebanon
By Ferran Quevedo
11 Jul 2014

Syrian children from the school of the parish of Qaa ar-Rim. Most of them just arrived fleeing the battles from northern Syria, and many have lost some of their relatives.
Recorded during January - Feb 2014 when the population of Qaa there were in critical moments surrounded by Syrian rebels attacking the towns of Hermel and Qaa firing rockets. Qaa is the first village on the Lebanese border and has been linked since the beginning of the war because of the proximity of several battles like Al-Qussair a year ago or Yabroud and Qalamoun when these images were recorded (see the map)

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Homemade Oil Refineries On an ISIL Fr...
Msheirfeh, Qamishli, northeast Syria
By Rozh
16 Jun 2014

February 26, 2014
Msheirfeh, Qamishli, Syria

Desperate conditions in northeastern Syria have caused some residents to turn to the dangerous practice of homemade, roadside oil-refining in the hope of earning enough to survive. The village of Msheirfeh is located on a volatile frontline between ISIL and and an alliance of Kurdish and Christian militias. Everyday, self-made oilmen risk their lives to refine raw crude oil, facing warfare and precarious working conditions. The oil refining process produces an uncontrollable amount of poisonous and explosive fumes and the unregulated working conditions have led to accidents with exploding refineries and poison-related amputations. Despite this, many young men see this kind of work as their only chance of earning a living, with schools and universities closed due to the civil war.

Interviews with workers:

First Interview (no name given):
''These are three barrels. We fill up three and we get from it one; gas, fuel and diesel. First we get the fuel. The bigger the fire, the more the product, this is the process.''

Second Interview (no name given):
''First we get the oil here; there’s water with it. We burn it for around 12 hours. First we get the fuel, after 4 or 5 hours. By then the water will be gone. Then we start getting gas and then diesel at the end. The barrel gets us 3000 liras, the gas 7 or 7 and a half, and the diesel 45 or 50. We’re not really making any money from it. We don’t want to do this anymore.”

Q: How long have you been working here and how does this effect on your health?

“It has been a month that I have worked here, there is nothing else to do. We make around 5000 Syrian Pounds ($33) on every barrel, sometimes 4000 ($26). Sometimes we only break even because the oil is expensive. In terms of side effects, your lungs get clogged. Some people are getting sick, major headaches. It is death, slow death. Sometimes there are explosions. Up until now we witnessed 5 explosions. One guy got cut in half. It doesn’t usually happen, but when you re-heat gasoline it often explodes. Someone did it and died. However this one here, if anything goes wrong, is not supposed to explode. We don’t trust the media, they’re bias. You guys might be here to stop us from work, but this is where we get our livelihood.
I don’t want to give my name because you might shut us down and I don’t have another way to make money. Find us another job and we will shut down the refineries. I am 18 years old, I was in college studying law but I stopped."

Q: Why did you come here? What were the circumstances for you leaving college?

"I was in law school, first year. I couldn’t sustain myself, I was begging for bread. So I came here, started working and started to make a little bit of money. Eventually I left college for good. We hope things go back to the way they were so I can move on with my life. Before it was much better, we were able to travel to Damascus and Lebanon. Now we can’t because of the stealing and killing that happens on the road. So I started working in these refineries, as you can see there’s nothing else. No more studies. Even the kids are working here. We hope things get back to normal and oil prices go down, because we’re barely making it.''

General talking:
First person: “Come and see the fuel coming up.”
Second Person: “This is oil with gas.”

Second Interview (no name given):
''There is a bit of water here with the fuel. Sometimes we get better oil that’s water-free, but nowadays we’re mostly getting oil mixed with water from the wells. We can’t tell where the problem is from, if it’s from the wells or the transporter. Oil prices are soaring, we get the oil for 3200 Syrian Pounds ($21) and pay an extra 500 ($3.30) to the guy. So in all you pay 3700 Syrian Pounds ($24), sometimes you break even, sometimes you lose 1000 ($6.6) or 1500 Syrian Pounds ($10).''

Third Interview - Maher Hussein:
“I scratched my hand on metal scrap from the barrels and I got oil on it. Now it’s been numb for a few weeks. Someone else got oil in his wounds so he went to a clinic and they cut off his hand. I’ve been working here for two months. I stopped working around a month ago, because of my hand."

Q: Are you scared they might cut off your hand as well?

“Of course I am afraid. I’ve been going to the doctor and getting some medicine but my hand’s not getting any better.”

Q: What did you do before working in the fields?

“I used to study and now I even stopped working here because of my hand and without oil there is no work.”

Fourth Interview – Ahmad Hamdosh:
“Before I was a schoolteacher, now I stopped school and I’m working here in the fields. We’re not sleeping at night because of the coughing. We were comfortable and happy working at the school. Now we work in oil and it’s full of sicknesses. Some guy got cancer working here. God knows what’s going to happen to my hand. There’s one guy they cut off three of his fingers because of a small scratch that he got oil on it. If they hadn’t cut them off, his whole hand would’ve been infected and they would have had cut it all off. Before you used to get compensation, now no one gives you anything and you can’t even work.

Most importantly, from the bottom of my heart I wish for security to come back. Security is the most important thing, security and affordable prices. I wish even it’d be half of what it was before. The barrels are getting here for 3500 Syrian Pounds ($23), which is almost nothing, and I’m still making sure it’s the exact amount on the scale. Now they’re charging us on the milliliter, before people used to make millions in the oil business.

My name is Ahmad and I’m 22 years old. You open this here and put in the oil, and then you turn on the fire under it. The smoke fills the upper half of the barrel, and then it goes into the tube and the pipe goes through the water and you get the fuel on the other side. After the fuel you get the gas, after the gas you get the diesel. At the end we open it here to take out the waste. We call it ‘zero’ and we keep it to fuel the fire for the barrels. A teapot, we’re heating water for tea here. We’re already getting all the smoke in our lungs; it is not going to make a difference if we boil the tea here.”

Fifth interview – Mehdi Darwish:
“I’m a business graduate. There’s nothing else to do around here. There’s no work in Hassake other then this. Working in oil is all right but the prices per barrel are getting higher and higher and the oil is coming mixed with water. We’re working hard through sweat and blood and we’re exhausting ourselves. We put in place a new oil refinery to enhance the production. The smoke goes through the tube, through the water, to cool it down and we get fuel, diesel and gas. There has to be two people working, one on the burner and the other one has to fill the tank. Out of three oil barrels we get one barrel of diesel and around 150(?) fuel and gas.”

Interview 6 – Awad Al Jasim:
“I used to work as a mechanic. I am 18 years old. I came here to work in the burners and I also have heart problems. Thank you!”

Interview 7 – Mohamed Monther:
“They [ISIL] throw the oil on the ground and take the cars and say that it is theirs now. They take the car sell it, or use it in car-bomb operations. We have nothing here we are barely getting by. They come from Pakistan and Kyrgyzstan looking for Nymphs (female sex jihadists) here. We don’t have any Nymphs here. Look at the state the Syrian people are in. This is no way to live.”

Interview 8 – No Name Given:
“Once they [ISIL] say ‘Allah Akbar’, they cut the person's head off. Is that halal? Are we chickens?”

Shot List: (Description of various shots in the video)

The rest of shots are wide shots of the refineries spread all over the main road and shots of the interviewees working, walking and talking with each other while on the makeshift refineries. The shots show the daily routine of life at the refineries.

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Syria's Anti-Assad Christian Militia
Qamishli
By Rozh
08 Jun 2014

‘Sutoro’ (‘Security’ or ‘Police’ in the ancient Syriac-Aramaic language) is an anti-Assad Christian security force operating in the predominantly Kurdish autonomous regions of northeastern Syria. Sutoro, whose members come from the ancient Syriac minority, patrol and protect the Christian neighborhoods in the area. They also fight alongside Kurdish forces against both Bashar al-Assad and islamist rebel groups like ISIS. Although Syriacs were not persecuted for being Christians under Assad's secular Baathist government, they claim that they were nationally oppressed because the Baath regime had declared Syria an Arab-only state and denied the existence of all other ethnic minorities.

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Ghouta Under siege
Syria
By Jawad Arbini
09 Apr 2014

Video shot in the month of December 2013 depicting conditions in eastern Ghouta, an area near Damascus under the control of Syrian rebels.
Includes the following elements:
- Artillery and aerial bombing strikes on buildings in Ghouta. - Damage to buildings from the bombing strikes. - Sand bags and barrels to protect against bombing strikes. - First aid class teaching women how to treat the wounded and prepare medications. - Pushing cars and riding bicycles because of a shortage of gasoline. - Using bicycles to charge car batteries for electrical power - Using windmills to create electricity. - Corn husks, kernels and beans to be ground into flour for bread. - People clamoring to buy bread in a bakery. - Cooking on fires in the street. - Chopping firewood to burn for heat. - Transporting water to homes.

Shot list:
1- Kids looking to the military jet
2- Jet striking
3- Airstrike hitting a building
4- Airstrike hitting a building
5- Smoke coming out of a stroke building
6- Airstrike to a building
7- Airstrike to a building
8- Airstrike to a building
9- Smoke coming out of a stroke building
10- Sand bags in front of some shops
11- Rocket hitting a building
12- A shop with some rocks replacing the front door glass
13- A window with plastic shelters replacing the glass
14- Broken pieces of glass on the street
15- A rocket hitting an building
16- A rocket hitting an building
17- A rocket hitting an building
18- Sand bags and barrels in front of a shop
19- Sand bags and barrels in front of a shop
20- Sand bags and barrels in front of a shop
21- A damaged building with a man standing on the balcony
22- Broken windows of a building
23- Broken windows of a building
24- Broken pieces of glass on the street
25- Broken windows of a building
26- Sand bags in front of a shop
27- Barrels in front of a shop with a broken front door glass
28- Some people coming in to the shop protected by barrels

29-Sound bite - Abu El Fowz – grocery store owner
I am the owner of this shop and because of the large number of customers we had to fortify the place with barrels in order to protect them, protect the children and protect ourselves. Many people died in front of my shop so we set this protection so that people coming in will be protected.

30-Sound bite - Abu Thaer – Factory employee
We are pretty much used to the shelling these days. Before when a shell hit, or there was gunfire or the security forces were invading you could see everyone running for shelter. Now people don’t care as much, what is there more than death? Death occurs once. We are being shelled daily, a couple of days ago a Mig plane hit us over there. Here are the streets; this is our daily life, film as much as you want no one really cares anymore. What more is he going to do to us? He tried to hit us with Rocket launchers, Scud missiles and Mig planes and he couldn’t defeat us, he will not be able to defeat us. God’s will is above all of this.

31-Abu Mohammad – plumber
Despite all the shelling that West Ghouta witnessed, forty shells a day, with missiles and warplanes we are not concerned. Our main concern is to break the siege over West Ghouta; our concern is the piece of bread we have to secure for our children. He can shell as much as he wants; just break the siege so we can feed the children.

32- medical equipment
33-A woman taking notes
34-A woman preparing a natural medicine out of honey and some creams
35-First aid trainer giving medical tips to some women
36-First aid trainer giving medical tips to some women
37-Women attending a first aid training session
38-First aid trainer giving tips to some women
39-Women attending a first aid training session

40-Sound bite - First Aid Trainer
If a man gets hit by a sniper in front of me, what can I do for him? As first aid, we have to stop the bleeding. I put gauze on the places of entrance and exit of the bullet, and then I wrap an ace bandage tightly around the wound. That is all I can do. I can't do anything but wrap his wounds tight with gauze and ace bandage to stop the bleeding.

41-Sound bite – A trainee trying to apply some of the tips she just learned
We empty the needle from bubbles. Then after arranging the head we empty the air that's inside. We divide the heart into four parts; we take the upper right chamber. We put in in the catheter fully, and then apply pressure with a finger here so the blood won't pour out. We pull off its cover and pull it out and the catheter will be ready. Then you tape it from both sides.

43- Man walking while he’s pushing his bike and a taxi car (out of oil)
44-Man walking with his bike holding a sack that contains vegetables
45-Kid trying to produce electric field out of his bike
46-Men on their bicycles
47- A man trying to fix an electric wire
48-A man fixing an electric wire in a battery
49-A man placing electric wires
50-A battery connected to a bike through electric wires
51-A man rolling the bike pedals to recharge the batteries
52- Men rolling the bike pedals to recharge the batteries
53-Boys rolling the bike pedals to recharge the batteries
54-Boy rolling the bike pedals to recharge the batteries
55-Boys rolling the bike pedals to recharge the batteries
56- Handmade Fan that uses wind to generate electric field
57- Handmade Fan that uses wind to generate electric field
58-tilt down for the handmade Fan that uses wind to generate electric field
59-Shavers connected to a battery
60-A bakery using the handmade fan to generate electricity and turn on the light
61-The wind is turning the fan connected with wired
62-Fan in function
63- Fan in function
64-lamps in the ceiling
65-lamps connected to batteries
66-Some people in a crowded shop shouting and trying to get bread
67-Some people in a crowded shop shouting and trying to get bread
68-Some deserts made out of milk on a table in the street
69-Cooker over rocks and fire in the street
70-A boy cooking some food in the street
71-Beet being boiled in water
72-Peel of corncobs
58-Man peeling the corncob
59-Peel of corncobs
60- Man cutting wood
61-Man cutting wood with a tree branch in the foreground
62- low angle shot for the street with rocks and snow in the foreground
63-Cabbage on the floor
64-Corn grinder in function
65-A sign that locates the grindery
66-A hand showing grains
67-corns
68- grinded corns
69-flour made out of corncob peel and corns
70-Men pushing a barrel filled with water

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Free Syrian Army Tunnels Under Damascus
Damascus, Southern highway
By Jawad Arbini
09 Apr 2014

Damascus

Video recorded on January 15, 2014 showing tunnels dug by the Free Syrian Army in the area of the Southern Highway in Damascus. The tunnels are used by the FSA to connect the villages of Qaboun, Barzeh, Zamalka and Jobar, move FSA fighters into Damascus and avoid positions controlled by Assad forces.
The FSA also tunnels under regime positions where they plant explosives to blow them up. The video shows fighters wiring explosives.
The video also shows FSA fighters monitoring surveillance cameras they placed for security and to watch Syrian Army movements.
The Southern Highway is a major strategic point which separates FSA and Assad forces. It is an important link among Damascus southern suburbs and it links the Damascus-Homs highway with the Damascus-Daraa route. And it is a key supply route for the Syrian Army.
The FSA has been targeting Syrian Army military vehicles traveling on the Southern Highway from Damascus to the Syrian Air Force Intelligence headquarters in Harasta.
The FSA has blocked the highway since last year at a number of locations near the communities of Arbin, Zamalka, Jobar and Ein Tarma.

Shot List:
1. Sniper scope
2. Syrian Army tank
3. Tank
4. Tank
5. Building on fire
6. Wreckage of military vehicle
7. Various shots of tunnels
8. Man in tunnel
9. Men in tunnel
10. Wiring explosives in tunnel - various shots
11. Explosion
12. Surveillance camera monitor
13. Fighters watch monitor
14. Various shots tunnels
15. WS countryside/buildings
16. Various shots of trucks
17. Damaged trucks

Transcription:

Sound bite: Souhail Tlas, Commander of Faihaa Brigade

"The Southern highway is the main way to enter Damascus from the towns of Kabbas, Mliha, Harasta and to the road to Damascus Airport. The highway is indeed a key supply route used by the regime as an alternate way to move tanks and military vehicles in order not to through the center of Damascus."

Sound bit: Souhail Tlas, Commander of Faihaa Brigade

"The Southern highway is extremely important because it is the main link between Daraa and Homs. The regime has been trying to take control over the highway for months but thanks to God he has never been able to do it because the whole area is completely linked and controlled by the FSA fighters."

Sound bite: Abu Samir, Field Commander of Moujahidin Brigade

"We dug this tunnel because it is hard to break into the regime military base, which is above us right now. It is quite hard because there is a wooded area that separates us so we dug this tunnel under the wooded area towards the military base. And now we will put explosives and blow up the building with all the soldiers and commanders inside."

Sound bite: Souhail Tlas, Commander of Faihaa Brigade

"We are now standing in front of a tunnel that reaches the entrance of Damascus. The FSA fighters have dug it in order to surround the militia of Hezbollah and regime forces. This is one of many tunnels that we have dug at the frontlines so no Shabiha and regime soldiers can escape from the FSA."

Sound bite: Obada, FSA Fighter

"We are always at the frontlines watching the regime soldiers. We are using these cameras. We are making it easier for FSA fighters to defeat any regime forces attack."

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 9
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

A young girl is working at her father's food kiosk on the street of Hawa ("Eve" in Arabic) mosque while he went home for lunch. The kiosk sells tomato paste, margarine and jam. Before the war it was a good middle and upper class neighborhood. Today, most people living in the area are on the border of poverty and have to face daily bombardments.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 2
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

Two sisters (right) and their cousins (left) are playing French skipping near their home. The house behind them was hit by mortars several times. Its inhabitants have abandoned it after the bombardments. Despite the danger the constant bombing threats, the girls continue to go out and meet in the streets to play.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 6
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

A young boy coming back from school stares at his neighbors' garden, which was bombed only one hour before. The garden is facing a park where children from the neighborhood often play.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 4
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

10 year-old Mohammed dropped out from school to work and help his parents and three younger siblings. Everyday, the young boy roams the streets of Duma collecting, wooden doors and furniture from shelled houses as well as material like nylon for his mom to cook. Mohammed also collects metal or anything that seems valuable and sells it for extra money. His father has been working as a porter since he lost his job at a bakery five months ago. All bakeries in Eastern Ghoutta have shut down because of the siege. Mohammad says he is proud of what he does and does not feel humiliated from working in the rubble.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 12
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

A young boy poses on his bike on the Al Kabeer mosque square, now referred to as the Al Hurriya (freedom) square, which has witnessed numerous protests since the war began in 2011. Children in Ghouta seem to have lost their sense of fear. They continue to play in the streets despite the constant threat of bombardments, shelling and clashes between armed groups and the Syrian army.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 1
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

Three neighbors walk in front of a five stories building that was destroyed by a Mig rocket on their way home after school. In Ghouta, basements are now safer than the surface. Classes are now happening in underground bunker schools.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 10
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

A young girl is working at her father's food kiosk on the street of Hawa ("Eve" in Arabic) mosque while he went home for lunch. The kiosk sells tomato paste, margarine and jam. Before the war it was a good middle and upper class neighborhood. Today, most people living in the area are on the border of poverty and have to face daily bombardments.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 3
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

10 year-old Mohammed dropped out from school to work and help his parents and three younger siblings. Everyday, the young boy roams the streets of Duma collecting, wooden doors and furniture from shelled houses as well as material like nylon for his mom to cook. Mohammed also collects metal or anything that seems valuable and sells it for extra money. His father has been working as a porter since he lost his job at a bakery five months ago. All bakeries in Eastern Ghoutta have shut down because of the siege. Mohammad says he is proud of what he does and does not feel humiliated from working in the rubble.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 8
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

A father climbs over a three meters high pile of rubble with his four year-old daughter to reach his house. When asked what he was doing, the father said he had just taken his daughter for a walk around the block to get some fresh air.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 5
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

Three children are playing in a building that used to host restaurants. The building was destroyed by rocket shelling and has now become a dumpster.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 11
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

Three children are walking in an empty street in the Hijjareya neighborhood of Ghouta. This rebel held area is located next to Al Wafedeen camp that is held by the Syrian regime and has been the target of heavy clashes between both parties. When asked what they are doing in the street, the children simply said their mother has sent them out to buy groceries.

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Children of Eastern Ghouta 7
Ghouta, Syria
By Yousef Albostany
01 Dec 2013

The kids are playing around over demolished houses. More than 50 houses were completely demolished by a bombardment of 4 rockets.

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In Arsal, the antechamber of life (12...
Arsal, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
21 Oct 2013

Commenting on the oath of UOSSM Dr.Kabakibo says "When you see your sister raped, your best friend die in front of you or your neighbourhood destroyed, it is hard to bear this oath in mind. That's why it's crucial to insist on its values every day." Here, the doctors learn how to take an injured person out of a car without worsening his state.

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In Arsal, the antechamber of life (9 ...
Arsal, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
21 Oct 2013

An old Syrian suffering from LUNG diseaseis now bedridden in Arsal's hospital. He lives in the Syrian camp of the city, among thousands of refugees. A cold wind sweeps the Bekaa valley and announces a hard winter for the Syrian families living in tents in the refugee camps of Lebanon.

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In Arsal, the antechamber of life (11...
Arsal, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
21 Oct 2013

Dr. Amer Kabakibo, left, explains that UOSSM already organised six war medicine trainings inside Syria and Turkey. This training is the second to take place in Lebanon. 300 trained doctors are now able to use war medicine techniques in the Syrian conflict. Last year, the retired French war doctor Raphael Pitti decided to created the UOSSM. Considering the situations the Syrian doctors were dealing with to save people's lives in the midst of the Syrian war, he decided to give them the tools to work with to counter their situation of minimum availability of material and workforce. After the training, they will return to their job in Arsal's hospital. But some of them say they could go back to Syria to exercise the techniques that they have learned during the training.

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In Arsal, the antechamber of life
Arsal, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
21 Oct 2013

The hospital of Arsal, set up in a mosque, has three surgical unit. But the lack of material is a constant worry. Last month, tens of Syrians suffering from severe burns after a bombing attack came from the Syrian city of Qalamoun to be cured in Arsal.

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In Arsal, the antechamber of life (3 ...
Arsal, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
21 Oct 2013

For five days, doctors train on how to treat a patient suffering from burns, how to save someone from under the rubbles after a bomb or shelling, and how to recognize the symptoms of a chemical attack among other techniques. Here, one of the doctors is learning how to give oxygen to a patient whose lips were burnt after an explosion.

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In Arsal, the antechamber of life (2 ...
Arsal, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
21 Oct 2013

Two Syrian doctors who are participating in the training. The oath of the UOSSM states "I swear to God that I will fulfil, according to my strength and capacity, the following commitments: I will give the necessary treatment to my friend as to my enemy, by preserving him from death and disease, from pain and anxiety. I will preserve the secrets and intimacy of each one, while ensuring to stay fair and honest. I will always try to develop my science and to use it wisely. I will be loyal to my profession and will respect my colleagues, and God is testimony of the present oath."

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In Arsal, the antechamber of life (8 ...
Arsal, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
21 Oct 2013

From the 17th till the 22th of October, 16 doctors and 16 nurses are learning about war medicine in Arsal, a Lebanese city bordering Syria. The training is organized by the Union of Syrian Organizations of Medical Aid (UOSSM), created in France and present in Turkey, Syria and Lebanon. Here, one of the trainers prepares a workshop, in the last floor of an unfinished building, used as a training center.

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In Arsal, the antechamber of life (6 ...
Arsal, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
21 Oct 2013

In Syria, most of the experienced doctors have fled to make use of their skills elsewhere from the very beginning of the conflict, leading to the general practitioners and young nurses being responsible for the health of millions. The doctors and nurses who remained in Qusayr during the battle of June 2013 had to flee to Arsal after surviving terrible events. Here, they opened a hospital to treat Syrian refugees who crossed the Syrian/Lebanese border. During the training sessions, they practice war medicine techniques on a model.

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In Arsal, the antechamber of life (1 ...
Arsal, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
21 Oct 2013

There are 40,000 Lebanese residents and 35,000 Syrian refugees in Arsal. The area, in the middle of the pro-Hezbollah region of the Bekaa is sympathetic to the Syrian rebels . As a result, Arsal suffers from isolation. The UOSSM trainers express that it is very difficult to transfer medical materials to Arsal and to transfer a patient from Arsal to another region of Lebanon.

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In Arsal, the antechamber of life (14...
Arsal, Lebanon
By Emmanuel Haddad
21 Oct 2013

For two years, the doctors from Qusayr were forced to work in secret. Dr. Hassan explains that their clandestine hospital in Qusayr was discovered five times, and bombed by the regime. According to the Human Rights Watch, the Syrian regime commited war crimes during the battle of Qusayr, which ended in June 2013, and didn't allow doctors to cure civilians and NGOs to help the population during the confrontation.

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Time kids to school despite the heavy...
aleppo
By Activist Halabi
07 Oct 2013

Report on the status of schools in the city of Aleppo and students time despite the heavy bombardment experienced by the city daily