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Rural Bosnia & Herzegovina Struggle w...
Sarajevo
By Transterra Editor
26 Sep 2013

Almost two decades after the war in Bosnia & Herzegovina ended, the country remains threatened by more than 120,000 landmines — about 2.5 percent of the total land mass — that remain a dark legacy of the war, buried in the ground along former frontlines.

While urban areas are being largely demined, people living in the remote landside of Bosnia are permanently threatened by the hidden hazards in the ground near their homes. Relatives of landmine victims, as well as survivors, mostly do not receive any governmental help. For these people live in remote areas with high unemployment rates with no possibility of earning money for a living, the only income for most is to collect firewood or fruits in the nearby forests. Some of these families have victims spanning two or three generations.

Without help from the government, the people largely depend on the Landmine Survivors Initiative (LSI), a non-governmental institution that provides affected people and communities with psychological and financial support. In some cases the NGO provides a greenhouse, in others agricultural machines, so that people can try to make a living instead of depending on the woods for survival.

Photos and Text by Michael Biach

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
26 Sep 2013

TURKEY, ISTANBUL: The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Art by Wouter Osterholt and Elke Uitentius. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
26 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey. 11th September 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Art by Christoph Schaefer. © Claudia Wiens/

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
23 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
17 Sep 2013

Traditional oil miner gathers buckets of crude oil to begin the distillation process of converting it into diesel fuel. Distillation is accomplished by heating the filtered crude oil to between 200 °C (392 °F) and 350 °C (662 °F). Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
17 Sep 2013

Motorcycle is loaded with drums of diesel and transported to nearby villages to be sold. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Al Qaeda Affiliated Rebels Execute Al...
Raqqa, Syria
By Transterra Editor
16 Sep 2013

-Al Qaeda affiliated rebels in Syria executed two Alawite men on September 16 in the main square of the rebel-controlled city of Raqqa. Fighters from the “Islamic state of the Levant and Iraq”, a Sunni extremist group affiliated with Al Qaeda, justified the execution on the grounds that the men were “Nusaries”, a derogritory term used to describe members of the Alawite sect of Islam, from which Syrian president Bashar al-Assad hails.

When local women witnessing the execution protested the actions of the fighters, the fighters cursed the women and claimed that the men had raped women in the city of Homs. The men were subsequently executed and their bodies carted away in the back of a pick-up truck. This event has reinforced fears that Sunni extremists will try to eliminate the Alawite community of Syria if president Bashar al-Assad falls from power.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
15 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
14 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Daily Life in Tareq Al-Bab Market in ...
Aleppo, Northwestern Syria
By Antonio-Pampliega
14 Sep 2013

Thousands of people make their daily life in the city of Aleppo.
The most important markets of the city remain open.
Customers flock to buy despite the bombings on different areas of the city.

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Mary and Salome - Polygamy in Kenya
Limuru, Kenya
By Loujain Rabbat
14 Sep 2013

Photos and Text by Celeste Hibbert.

A long hedge passes through Peter’s land, separating his wives’s houses. Mary and Salome share many things like cooking, taking care of the same kids, and being married to the same man.

It is estimated that 8 percent of Kenyan women are currently in polygamous marriages. The numbers, however, are decreasing due to the increasing expenses of providing for two women. Moreover, Kenya’s law does not recognize polygamous unions between Christians, and excludes the second spouse from the husband’s inheritance.

Kenya’s Marriage Bill 2013 is working on legitimizing polygamy under customary law to legally protect the women and ensure they are treated equally by their spouse.
Kenyan women of poor status view polygamy as practical and, to them, “Money and security will always take precedent over monogamous love.”

To Read Article: http://www.transterramedia.com/media/22118

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Turkey, Istanbul
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou Rahme work collaboratively from their base in Ramallah, Palestine across a range of sound, image, installation, and performance. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Turkey, Istanbul
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou Rahme work collaboratively from their base in Ramallah, Palestine across a range of sound, image, installation, and performance. © Claudia Wiens/

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou Rahme work collaboratively from their base in Ramallah, Palestine across a range of sound, image, installation, and performance. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Diego Bianchi's art work, shown in SALT Gallery, emerged during the last decade as a magnifying and distorting lens of urban life that focused on the formal and mostly chaotic traces of consumerism. Bianchi's project for the 13th Istanbul Biennial is an installation inspired by any given city's brash.

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Gulsun Karamustafa's work is shown in SALT Gallery. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Diego Bianchi's art work, shown in SALT Gallery, emerged during the last decade as a magnifying and distorting lens of urban life that focused on the formal and mostly chaotic traces of consumerism. Bianchi's project for the 13th Istanbul Biennial is an installation inspired by any given city's brash.© Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey. 11th September 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Art bei Sener Ozmen. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou Rahme work collaboratively from their base in Ramallah, Palestine across a range of sound, image, installation, and performance. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. "The Doorman" by Jimmie Durham, a sculptor, writer, and poet. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Diego Bianchi's art work, shown in SALT Gallery, emerged during the last decade as a magnifying and distorting lens of urban life that focused on the formal and mostly chaotic traces of consumerism. Bianchi's project for the 13th Istanbul Biennial is an installation inspired by any given city's brash. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
12 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey . 12th Sep, 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Gulsun Karamustafa's work is shown in SALT Gallery. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
11 Sep 2013

TURKEY, ISTANBUL: The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Wall by Jorge Mendez Blake. © Claudia Wiens

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he 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
11 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey. 11th September 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. © Claudia Wiens

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he 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
11 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey. 11th September 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Art by Peter Robinson. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
11 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey. 11th September 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Art by Claire Pentecost. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Claudia Wiens
11 Sep 2013

Istanbul, Turkey. 11th September 2013. The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Art by Christoph Schaefer. © Claudia Wiens

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The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am ...
Istanbul, Turkey
By Transterra Editor
10 Sep 2013

TURKEY, ISTANBUL: The 13th Istanbul Biennial, “Mom, am I barbarian?”, curated by Fulya Erdemci, runs from 14 September untill 20 October. Admission to the biennial exhibitions is free, overlapping with the biennial’s vision to create a public space and be accessible to everyone. Wall by Jorge Mendez Blake. © Claudia Wien

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Her and Me: Drag Queen Transformation
Lille, France
By Simon Letellier
10 Sep 2013

Drag Queen Transformation is both an art and a form of self-expression that is little appreciated and understood by outsiders. Beginning in July 2013, French photographer Simon Letellier began travelling around France and documenting the “transformation” process of men who dress up as women. The result is this collection of “before and after” photos illustrating the stunning physical transformation these men achieve, be it for an evening, a drag show, or a simple photo.

For each of these men, transforming into a female character is about more than just changing physical appearance, it is a form of self-expression. It is also a positive outlet for men whose personal stories are often laced with painful memories of social repression and a longing to simply be one’s self.

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Housing in Havana
Havana, Cuba
By Transterra Editor
10 Sep 2013

“It’s falling down.” This was the answer I invariably received when I asked the residents of Old and Central Havana about their homes.

These photographs originated from my desire to see what it looks like to living inside some of the crumbling grandeur of Havana’s buildings. I knocked on doors and begged for permission to photograph the residents and the interiors of their homes. I photographed inside almost a hundred different homes. Most of the homes I visited are in Old Havana. Old Havana was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1982. Since this date many key buildings have been restored and the work continues but the emphasis is always on preserving buildings rather than improving or saving making the lives of the general population easier. While certain buildings are restored to a higher standard, the vast majority of the homes remain in a dangerous condition.

Age, decay, neglect, over-crowding and amateur repairs combined with natural factors threaten the stability of Havana’s Baroque, Neoclassical and Art Deco buildings. There are two or three partial or total building collapses in Old and Central Havana every week. Residents have no choice but to continue to live in buildings that have partially collapsed.

Despite the condition of the buildings, most of the homes I visited were filled with personal, social, cultural and religious clues about their occupants. Most were also filled with vibrant colours, mementos, belongings, beloved pets and human warmth and spirit.

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Nuclear Power in Kudankulam, India
Kudankulam, India
By Transterra Editor
09 Sep 2013

Idinthakarai, a majority Christian fishing village near the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP) in India, has become the epicenter of the anti-nuclear movement in the region. There is an estimated one million people living within 30 kilometers of the plant in villages all along the coast of Mannar — which is against the stipulated safety rules of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) of India — and the people deeply fear that poor regulation at the KKNPP could result in a disaster similar in scale to Fukushima.

Representing this cause, since 2011, the People’s Movement Against Nuclear Energy (PMANE) has been holed up in Idinthakarai where their headquarters is located. Idinthakarai's only entry point is closely guarded by villagers which, coupled with rumours about the villagers being armed with crude bombs, means the police are reluctant to enter this zone and deal with protests.

PMANE largely depends on the efforts of the women, and the support of local priests and churches to gather support and manpower in the area for the anti-nuclear protests. They work from the Lourde Mary Church in Idinthakarai, 6 km away from the power plant, dutifully sending out press releases and Facebook updates on the rare robust internet connection provided by the church, demanding for the Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL) to address their fears.

On May 6, 2013, the Supreme Court of India cleared the way for operations to begin at the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KKNPP). But despite the villagers' need for energy from other sources, and PMANE's best efforts, they still have received little or no safety-training in the event of a disaster. And the NPCIL continues to do little to assuage the fears of the local fishing communities.

Photos by Jyorthy Karat.
Article by Srinath Perur.

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Niger, a Dark Paradise of Uranium
Niamey, Niger
By Transterra Editor
05 Sep 2013

An unsteady bike headlight and a kid eager to escape from his mother’s arms can easily turn into a tragedy. Because when night shows up, only the headlights of the cars furtively light up the faces of Niamey’s inhabitants.

In the rural areas of Niger, where more than 83 percent of Nigeriens live and less than 2 percent of the inhabitants have access to electricity, people have to sleep at 8 p.m. because, by then, it is already dark and there is no electricity. With a blistering 48 degrees in summer and barely any electricity to turn on a fan, the people of Niger live in “darkness, warmth and insecurity,” says activist of Right of Energy organisation.

The national rate of access to electricity in Niger does not exceed 10 percent, while France lights up almost one third of its light bulbs from Uranium it extracted from Niger. Niger’s contract with Areva, which France owns 80 percent of, is expected to be renewed by the end of 2013 and currently, negotiations are underway.
The government is looking for Niger's best interest, rather than France's, as the Nigerien Minister of Mines says, “natural resources must serve our country’s interests.” This is particularly important, since the country has been ranked as the least developed country when it came to UNDP’s index of human development.

It was announced that a new mine pit will soon be open and, starting from 2015, 5000 tons of uranium will be extracted from it each year. This mine, however, was attributed to Areva in 2009, and so far, all subcontractors in the project have been foreign. Nevertheless, it has been stated that this mine will contribute to the development of Niger in the fields of health, eduction, transportation, water and access to energy. Civil society activists are skeptic of this project and have been taking measures such as organizing debates and forums and surveying the behavior of new investors, in order to ensure that they receive what they have been promised.

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Christians Targeted in Al-Minya
Al-Minya, Egypt
By Transterra Editor
03 Sep 2013

After police violently dispersed Morsi supporters from two Cairo squares, Nahda and Rabaa squares , sectarian violence erupted in lower Egypt. Angry mobs burned churches in Al-Minya, along with houses and stores run by Christian people. Egypt's Christians are now living in fear.