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Migrants (6 of 43)
Calais, France
By Carsten Snejbjerg
31 Mar 2010

The days goes in circles. Time is spendt on waiting for the next free meal and the next oportunity for getting to England. Most of the time the migrants are staying close to the food distribution. Doing nothing.

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Dadaab
Dadaab
By carloscastro
30 Nov 2009

Can a shelter become a prison? "We cannot leave the camp neither go back to our country nor prosper". At the same time, can a shelter become homeland? "In this place I grow myself, I studied, worked and became father. I feel home". This is a contradiction faced by refugees of the largest camp worldwide, Dadaab, in north-eastern Kenya.
This is the case of Omar, Hassan and Mohamed, three Somalian young men who arrived to Dadaab in 1991, when the war started in Somalia and the camp was created. Their memories of their previous lives are reduced to some blurry images. In these two decades, they have become part of an incipient middle class, but despite that, their aim is to get one of the prized visas to start a new life in another country.
While they think on leaving, 6.000 people arrive every month from Somalia. N-0 is one of the areas where new arrivals are settled and Mohamed Alí is its leader. For them, the camp means safety, but restarting life there is difficult either.
A few of them leave; a lot arrive; all of them "hoping the best but prepared for the worst".

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Smiling face
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
07 Jan 2009

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Little man holding the fake rocket
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
07 Jan 2009

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Among fake rockets
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
02 Jan 2009

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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On Fire
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
01 Jan 2009

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Someone little
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
01 Jan 2009

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Landscape Of A Refugee Camp
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
01 Jan 2009

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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A smile
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
31 Dec 2008

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Cold River
Tripoli, Lebanon
By JonathanII
11 Sep 2007

The 2007 siege on the Palestinian refugee camp, Nahr El Bared.

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Tskhaltubo
Tskhaltubo, Georgia
By Carsten Snejbjerg
14 Feb 2007

An estimated 300,000 people were displaced as a result of Georgias wars against two separatist military campaigns, one in the Black Sea region of Abkhazia in the northwest, and the other in the northeast region of South Ossetia. The war over Abkhazian, between 1992 and 1994, led to the displacement of mainly ethnic Georgians.

There are no running water in the rooms. The families have to collect the water from a post outside.

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Rohingya #09
Sittwe
By Lauren DeCicca
01 Jan 2000

Myanmar has been in a stage of rapid transition throughout the past couple of years with advancements in development and western trade. However, the Rohingya Muslims, an ethnic minority in the western Rakhine State of Burma, have remained one of the most persecuted minorities in the world. June 11, 2012 marked the first in a series of “The Rahkine State riots”, conflicts between Rahkine Buddhists and the Muslim minority, leaving approximately 100,000 Muslims displaced and living in internal displacement camps. They are jobless, living in makeshift tents, and surviving on rations from NGO’s and private donors. Issues surrounding sanitation, nutrition and healthcare are serious problems these people are facing. The Rohingyas struggle between wanting resettlement and wanting to move to a more welcoming country. They have been stripped of their human rights and this essay aims to document the prolonged deterioration of their freedoms instead of the select instances of violence.

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Rohingya #20
Maungdaw
By Lauren DeCicca
01 Jan 2000

Myanmar has been in a stage of rapid transition throughout the past couple of years with advancements in development and western trade. However, the Rohingya Muslims, an ethnic minority in the western Rakhine State of Burma, have remained one of the most persecuted minorities in the world. June 11, 2012 marked the first in a series of “The Rahkine State riots”, conflicts between Rahkine Buddhists and the Muslim minority, leaving approximately 100,000 Muslims displaced and living in internal displacement camps. They are jobless, living in makeshift tents, and surviving on rations from NGO’s and private donors. Issues surrounding sanitation, nutrition and healthcare are serious problems these people are facing. The Rohingyas struggle between wanting resettlement and wanting to move to a more welcoming country. They have been stripped of their human rights and this essay aims to document the prolonged deterioration of their freedoms instead of the select instances of violence.