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Cox's Bazaar
By Jonathan Giesen
11 Oct 2017

A group of Rohingya women and children wait at the processing center for refugees near Sha Porir Dwip Island, to be identified and taken to one of the sprawling refugee camps in Bangladesh. 13 October 2017.

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Cox's Bazaar
By Jonathan Giesen
10 Oct 2017

TestiRohingya girl at Balukhali Refugee Camp, in Bangladesh. 11 October 2017.ng

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Cox's Bazaar
By Jonathan Giesen
10 Oct 2017

Rohingya refugee with her son at Balukhali Refugee camp. Senuwara arrived to the camp the night before the picture was taken, after fleeing her village in Buthidaung (Arakan State, Burma), with her husband and her in-laws. She had given birth to her baby, Robi Alam, eight days before, while she was on her way to Bangladesh. 11 October 2017.

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Cox's Bazaar
By Jonathan Giesen
10 Oct 2017

Bangladeshi doctor administers a vaccine against cholera to a child refugee at Balukhali Refugee Camp, in Bangladesh. 12 October 2017.

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Cox's Bazaar
By Jonathan Giesen
10 Oct 2017

Rohingya refugees queue at the food distribution center in Balukhali Refugee Camp, in Bangladesh. 12 October 2017.

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Cox's Bazaar
By Jonathan Giesen
10 Oct 2017

Rohingya girl struggles to enter into a food distribution center in Balukhali Refugee Camp, in the midst of a crowd of starving refugees. 12 October 2017.

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Cox's Bazaar
By Jonathan Giesen
10 Oct 2017

A man walks by a queue of Rohingya refugees in a food distribution center in Balukhali camp, in Bangladesh. 11 October 2017.

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Cox's Bazaar
By Jonathan Giesen
10 Oct 2017

A group of Rohingya unload a truck with sacks of food to be distributed at Balukhali Refugee Camp, in Bangladesh. 11 October 2017.

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Cox's Bazaar
By Jonathan Giesen
10 Oct 2017

Two Rohingya boys watch as the Bangladeshi Army builds a new road crossing the sprawling refugee camps in camps. 12 October 2017.

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Cox's Bazaar
By Jonathan Giesen
10 Oct 2017

Group of Rohingya women at Balukhali Refugee Camp, in Bangladesh. 11 October 2017.

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Cox's Bazaar
By Jonathan Giesen
09 Oct 2017

Rohingya refugees queue at the food distribution center in Balukhali Refugee Camp, in Bangladesh. 11 October 2017.

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ITALY -ROME- REFUGEES- EVICTION
Rome
By Christian Minelli
24 Aug 2017

Italy, Rome: A woman fells on ground after being hit by a water cannon used to disperse refugees who were evicted from a palace in the center of Rome on August 24, 2017. The UN's refugee agency (UNHCR) voiced "grave concern" over the eviction of 800 people from a Rome building squatted mainly by asylum seekers and refugees from Eritrea and Ethiopia. Almost 200 people expelled from the building sleep on the streets from 19 of August.

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WFP Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Lebanon May...
Bar Elias
By oski1980
02 May 2017

Interviews with the WFP Executive Director, Mr. David Beasley; Syrian Refugees and supporting B-Roll in Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Lebanon May 1, 2017.

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WFP Interviews Adam Camp, Bar Elias, ...
Camp Adam
By oski1980
30 Apr 2017

WFP Interviews Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Lebanon May 1, 2017

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WFP B-Roll Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Leba...
Adam Camp
By oski1980
30 Apr 2017

WFP B-Roll Adam Camp, Bar Elias, Lebanon May 1, 2017

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Goma Refugees 11
Beni
By Luke Dennison
23 Jun 2016

A pygmy woman rests near Oicha, Beni territory, not far from the recent attack on July 5th. Pygmy’s, who have been forced out of their homes in the bush by the ADF, now seek refuge in mud huts closer to the village. June 23rd, 2016

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Goma Refugees 12
Beni
By Luke Dennison
23 Jun 2016

A pygmy man poses inside his mud hut near Oicha, Beni territory. The only aid remaining outside of Goma is RRMP (Rapid Response to Movement of People), an aid group helping those in immediate crisis from the conflicts. Refugees around the nation are all facing the same crisis – no more aid. June 23rd, 2016.

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Goma Refugees 03
Goma
By Luke Dennison
18 Jun 2016

A child resident of Mugunga refugee camp. June 18, 2016

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Goma Refugees 14
Goma
By Luke Dennison
18 Jun 2016

A woman in Mugunga refugee camp makes charcoal, a common resource used by the refugees and sold at market. June 18, 2016

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Goma Refugees 04
Goma
By Luke Dennison
18 Jun 2016

Children gather rain water in Mugunga refugee camp for drinking. Without aid supplying free water, many refugees cannot afford the commodity of clean drinking water. June 18, 2016

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Goma Refugees 06
Goma
By Luke Dennison
18 Jun 2016

A woman inside her home in Mugunga refugee camp washes dishes after preparing a meal of beans. June 18, 2016

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Goma Refugees 08
Goma
By Luke Dennison
18 Jun 2016

A child resident of Mugunga refugee camp stands outside her home. Many children have no memory of what their parents call home, as their entire life has been spent in the camps. June 18, 2016

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Goma Refugees 13
Goma
By Luke Dennison
18 Jun 2016

A man in Mugunga refugee camp expresses his frustration, saying, “It is better to go home and risk the rebels than die of starvation here. It is better to die and be buried at home.” He also explains that the plastic bottles he holds are what they are forced to used as firewood, when they cannot afford to purchase it. June 18, 2016.

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Goma Refugees 01
Goma
By Luke Dennison
17 Jun 2016

A view of Bulengo refugee camp on the outskirts of Goma, DRC. June 17, 2016

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Goma Refugees 02
Goma
By Luke Dennison
17 Jun 2016

Children watch as Mercy Corps distributes its last supply of water containers in Bulengo refugee camp. Mercy Corps was the last aid group to leave the camps surrounding Goma. June 17, 2016

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Goma Refugees 05
Goma
By Luke Dennison
17 Jun 2016

A man in Mugunga refugee camp sews material to be sold at market. June 17, 2016.

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Goma Refugees 07
Goma
By Luke Dennison
17 Jun 2016

Women residents of Mugunga refugee camp carry large bags of charcoal to be sold at the camps market. June 17, 2016

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Goma Refugees 09
Goma
By Luke Dennison
17 Jun 2016

Children in Mugunga refugee camp rest after hauling large bags of lava rock to be sold for building material. Since the eruption of Mount Nyiragongo in 2002, refugees have used the lava rock as foundation support around the tents as well as a means of survival. June 17, 2016

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Goma
By Luke Dennison
17 Jun 2016

A woman in Mugunga refugee camp sells potatoes at the market located in the center of the camp. Other popular vegetables being sold include cassava, maize, and beans. June 17, 2016

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Sunni Kurd Minorities Take Refuge in ...
Homs, Syria
By TTM Contributor 8
09 Jun 2016

June 9, 2016
Homs, Syria

Kurdish Sunni minorities of Akrad Dasneh, a small town in north-eastern Homs, have been kicked out of their hometown encircled by towns predominated by Alawites loyal to the Assad regime.
Hundreds of families are now distributed among Ghanto and neighboring towns in rural Homs. They are taking refuge in buildings mainly used for cattle and goats.
Abu Ibrahim, his mother and his family have fled their home in Akrad Dasneh and had to relocate several times. The family is now sheltering in one of these barns under miserable living conditions.

00:59 Abu Ibrahim
“We are Kurds of Dasneh. We used to live with other Alawite residents loyal to Assad regime. They put pressure on us and shot at our homes. They also killed two of our young men and kidnapped some others. Residents loyal to Assad regime joined the fights in central Homs and the neighboring areas, and some of their men got killed in the clashes so they used to come after us for revenge. We are minorities and we were force to flee our homes. It’s been four years now and out situation is getting worse. Everything is expensive and the Russian airstrikes hit non-stop. We keep on moving from one place to another.”

01:47 Abu Ibrahim
“The kids eat thyme and goat very often, sometimes we don’t even have bread. We cannot afford to buy bread; it coasts between 300 SYP (1.4 USD) and 500 SYP (2.3 USD). In Ramadan we fast all day and when it’s time to eat we have almost nothing, no food. Women who are supposed to fast are also breast-feeding their babies and they should be having enough food and nutrition to produce enough milk for the babies.”

02:30 Abu Ibrahim
“We are here sheltering in stores with cattle. Just behind this shelter there are cows and sheep. The kids here are suffering from asthma and respiration problems because of the smell. We live in miserable conditions. Look here how can this shelter be an isolation tool. If I could remove it you could see the cattle right behind us.. The babies one month and two months old are suffering from asthma because of these conditions.”

03:28 Hassan
Q: “What are you lacking?”
A: “We are lacking everything, we need clothing we need everything.. We used to go to public guarding and playgrounds, now it’s impossible because of the shelling. We used to go to school, but now we cannot go anymore.
Q: “What is that you need the most?”
A: “Clothing.. School.. Everything.”

04:26 Aisha
“We don’t have enough food. Thank God we are alive. We only seek God’s mercy.. May God bless you.. He wanted us to be here. We thank him for everything.”

05:08 Um Ibrahim
“We are Kurds of Dasneh. We used to live with people loyal to Assad regime in our hometown, but they were pressuring us and forced us to leave our homes. We fled at night with our kids and here we are it’s been four years and we are still away from our homes. You can see our living conditions. We have to keep relocating from place to another. We are barely receiving one meal per day and it’s insufficient for us and our children. No one is looking after us it’s been four years. The children can’t even play they sit here with us all day in the stores. It’s been four years. Where shall we go? We were kicked out of our homes and lands. Where shall we go?"

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Iraqi Troops Evacuate Civilians in Fa...
Fallujah
By mushtaq mohammed
08 Jun 2016

Video shows Iraqi Federal Police officers evacuating civillians from ISIS-controlled areas in south eastern Fallujah.
Iraqi pro-government forces have launched a military operation to retake Fallujah, a major ISIS stronghold in Iraq's largest province of Anbar.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
12 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
11 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
11 May 2016

Singer Okuta Ceasar Malis, known as 'Silver X' in his imported Japanese convertible outside his home in Juba, South Sudan.

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Juba
By alexiawebster
10 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-10
Juba
By alexiawebster
09 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-7
Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-3
Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-5
Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.

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Alexia_Webster_NYT_portfolio-11
Juba
By alexiawebster
08 May 2016

South Sudan's millennials are a generation of displaced. They grew up stateless, in uncertainty, mostly spending their childhoods and teenage years in refugee camps in neighboring countries. When South Sudan got independence 5 years ago this homeless generation returned full of hope, finally having a country to call their own. But the worlds youngest nation has been plagued by violence, with a civil war breaking out in 2013 and most recently fighting erupting in the capital of Juba once again. When I visited in May I spent time with some of the musicians, artists, fashion designers and entrepreneurs who are trying to be part of the world of global youth culture and yet surrounded by uncertainty and anxiety. Everyday life in the capital was precarious, dangerous and often unstable and yet this younger generation who grew up as refugees were determined to stay and make a home, to continue to make music, dance, go a bit wild and be free. Since the fighting broke I have been chatting to many of the people I spent time with a few months ago. Over whatsapp they told me of listening to gun shots outside their front doors, dead bodies on the streets, of whatsapp group messages telling them that different ethnic groups were being hunted in the city and of friends being killed. Most fled the capital and returned to the cities are camps they were raised in.