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COVID-19: The Struggle Inside Spanish...
Barcelona
By Antolo
03 Dec 2020

When the pandemic started to hit Europe during the month of March, Spain was one of the first affected countries. The critical situation it faced was directly linked to the high life expectancy of Spain’s population. The country is one of the places with the most geriatric homes and residents in all of Europe. Can Serra, in Sant Esteve Sesrovires(Barcelona), was one of the geriatric homes affected during the first wave of the pandemic. With limited resources and little support from the public administration, the center’s director, Ceci Boladeras, and the rest of the staff faced an unprecedented health crisis.

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COVID-19: The Struggle Inside Spanish...
Sant Esteve Sesrovires, Barcelona
By Antolo
21 Apr 2020

Staff from a funeral home remove the body of a COVID victim from the geriatric home Can Serra.

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COVID-19: The Struggle Inside Spanish...
Sant Esteve Sesrovires, Barcelona
By Antolo
21 Apr 2020

Esperanza, 95, passed away due to COVID in the geriatric home on April 21st, 2020.

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COVID-19: The Struggle Inside Spanish...
Sant Esteve Sesrovires, Barcelona
By Antolo
21 Apr 2020

A nurse awaits the funeral home’s services for the removal of a deceased patient.

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COVID-19: The Struggle Inside Spanish...
Sant Esteve Sesrovires, Barcelona
By Antolo
16 Apr 2020

A doctor and a nurse from the public health system visited the home daily to perform triage of the infected patients that stood a chance of recovery, so they could be taken to the hospital.

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COVID-19: The Struggle Inside Spanish...
Sant Esteve Sesrovires, Barcelona
By Antolo
15 Apr 2020

A COVID-infected resident in the nursing home Can Serra is comforted by her nurse through physical contact, who carefully uses all safety precautions.

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COVID-19: The Struggle Inside Spanish...
Sant Esteve Sesrovires, Barcelona
By Antolo
15 Apr 2020

Ana Dominguez, 47, psychologist and volunteer during the pandemic in the geriatric center Can Serra, pays daily visits to those who are not affected by the virus, but are isolated in their rooms and social distancing to avoid the spread.

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COVID-19: The Struggle Inside Spanish...
Sant Esteve Sesrovires, Barcelona
By Antolo
15 Apr 2020

Two Can Serra workers communicate through the glass door that separates the field hospital from the home’s common areas.

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COVID-19: The Struggle Inside Spanish...
Sant Esteve Sesrovires, Barcelona
By Antolo
14 Apr 2020

María, 92, is looked after by the home’s physiotherapist, Martí, in the field hospital enabled by the geriatric center since the start of the pandemic.

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COVID-19: The Struggle Inside Spanish...
Sant Esteve Sesrovires, Barcelona
By Antolo
14 Apr 2020

Staff transfer a COVID positive patient to a seperate room, where she will be socially distanced from others.

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COVID-19: The Struggle Inside Spanish...
Sant Esteve Sesrovires, Barcelona
By Antolo
14 Apr 2020

At the start of the health crisis, the shortage of personal protective equipment encouraged neighbors from Sant Esteve Sesrovires, home to Can Serra, to produce their own gear using materials available to them, like trash bags, in order to help the nursing home in any way they could.

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COVID-19: The Struggle Inside Spanish...
Sant Esteve Sesrovires, Barcelona
By Antolo
13 Apr 2020

Andrea, the center’s social worker, enables video calls daily amongst healthy patients and their families. The situation for those infected is different; recorded messages from both parts.

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covid_bcn_07
Barcelona, Catalonia
By Antolo
15 Mar 2020

Kangyung Xiao, lawyer and advisor for freelancers and SMEs, during the interview via videoconference for SCMP while in quarantine in her Barcelona residence.

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Barcelona, Catalonia
By Antolo
13 Mar 2020

Two women place a closed notice in their business along with the hashtag #yomequedoencasa that urges citizens not to leave their homes during the outbreak.

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Barcelona, Catalonia
By Antolo
13 Mar 2020

Most of the businesses run by Chinese citizens have been preventively closed due to the covid-19 since the end of last February.

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covid_bcn_04
Barcelona, Catalonia
By Antolo
13 Mar 2020

A boy plays in a blocked door of a Chinese parapharmacy located in a usually bustling street of Barcelona. Even though some of the shop’s entrance doors remain open, the owners make it clear that they’re closed.

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covid_bcn_02
Barcelona, Catalonia
By Antolo
13 Mar 2020

Two women place a closed notice in their business along with the hashtag #yomequedoencasa that urges citizens not to leave their homes during the outbreak.

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covid_bcn_01
Barcelona, Catalonia
By Antolo
13 Mar 2020

The owner of a copy center in downtown Barcelona puts up a sign to inform customers that the business will remain closed until further notice.

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covid_bcn_05
Barcelona, Catalonia
By Antolo
13 Mar 2020

All the workers in the last shops owned by Chinese that remain open in Barcelona, most of them groceries, wear masks to prevent passing the virus to customers and amongst themselves.

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covid_bcn_06
Barcelona, Catalonia
By Antolo
13 Mar 2020

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez announced on march 14th that hair salons will be one of the only businesses alongside supermarkets that will remain open during the outbreak for hygiene reasons. Aurora, on the picture, is the owner of three salons in Barcelona.

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SPAIN- BARCELONA- CATALONIA- INDIPEND...
Barcelona
By Christian Minelli
10 Oct 2017

Spain, Barcelona: Pro-independence supporters take part in a rally in Barcelona, Spain, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017.Catalan President Puigdemont has proposed to suspend Catalonia's declaration of independence for few weeks to hold talks with Spanish government.

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The Reborns
Palma de Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
26 Oct 2016

Ethel Ruiz is mother to 28 babies. Everyone of them changes lives.

Produced for Indigenous Media for their web series, 60 Second Docs.

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The Wood, The Whale and The Sane
Villafranca de Bonany
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
01 Oct 2016

A story of wooden whales, a seatime cemetery and splintered hands. A visual poem from Mallorca for Zooppa.

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Correfoc: Run with the Devil in Spain
Palma de Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
23 Jun 2016

Every summer, Spanish Mediterraneans celebrate the day of Sant Joan with screeching fireworks, demented devils, fire-breathing dragons and raging bonfires. Evil spirits are chased away by 'dimonis' - devils - and the public are allowed to join in with little respect for health and safety.

The origins of 'correfoc' - fire-running - date back to the 12th century. In Palma de Mallorca, as elsewhere in Catalonia, Valencia and the Balearic Islands, running with the devil eludes the attempts of the European Union to regulate its safety. It continues much as it always has.

*Complete story available

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Wake Up Dance in Spain
Deià, Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
19 Mar 2016

The best high in the Mediterranean isn’t on Ibiza. It’s in the mountains of Mallorca and it’s called Wake Up Dance. Llewelyn, a DJ who grew tired of the night scene, is transforming the idea of going out from the small Mallorquín village of Deià. Every Saturday morning for a few hours he shares his passion for music for free to all those interested. At this party, there's no room for booze or drugs. Only endorphins.

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Wake Up Dance in Spain (with English ...
Deià, Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
19 Mar 2016

The best high in the Mediterranean isn’t on Ibiza. It’s in the mountains of Mallorca and it’s called Wake Up Dance. Llewelyn, a DJ who grew tired of the night scene, is transforming the idea of going out from the small Mallorquín village of Deià. Every Saturday morning for a few hours he shares his passion for music for free to all those interested. At this party, there's no room for booze or drugs. Only endorphins.

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Leftovers
Palma de Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
09 Feb 2016

‘Leftovers’ puts us in the eyes of Mallorquin photographer, Miquel Julià, to see life as he does without filters or effects. His camera opens our eyes to those things that are normally so close to us that we don’t see them. (English subtitles)

*This is the first video of the series Historias Mínimas, or Little Tales, in collaboration with Tarek Serraj (tarekserraj.com)

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Arabic for Solidarity
Palma de Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
06 Feb 2016

(English subtitles)

In May 2015, two Arabic languages teachers in Palma de Mallorca decided to offer free classes as the refugee crisis grew. The public response was more than they expected. Yet nine months later, just 19 refugees have been welcomed by the Spanish government while the waiting list for the course continues to grow.

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Estella: the Unique Mallorcan Sheepdog
Felanitx, Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
04 Feb 2016

‘Estella’ is a very cinematic and intimate four-minute piece. Estella is a very special sheep dog, a Ca de Bestiar, a breed unique to Mallorca. In this slice of rural life, we see her work with Miquel, a shepherd, as the twilight hour approaches on this Mediterranean island.

*English subtitled version: https://www.transterramedia.com/media/67629

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Estella: the Unique Mallorcan Sheepdo...
Felanitx, Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
04 Feb 2016

‘Estella’ is a very cinematic and intimate four-minute piece. Estella is a very special sheep dog, a Ca de Bestiar, a breed unique to Mallorca. In this slice of rural life, we see her work with Miquel, a shepherd, as the twilight hour approaches on this Mediterranean island.

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Global Climate March - Madrid, Spain ...
Madrid
By Daniel Stemler
29 Nov 2015

Thousands of protesters marched through the center of Madrid (Spain) during the Global Climate March on Sunday. The protest aimed to draw attention to climate change and force world leaders to implement serious actions against climate change on the '2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference' (COP21) in Paris.
In Spain, the protests were organized by Alliance for the Climate, a coalition of more than 400 organizations including Greenpeace. The coalition organized several climate change marches in different Spanish cities. Apart from Madrid, there were protests in Barcelona, Valencia, Bilbao, Zaragoza, Valladolid, A Coruña, Pamplona, Murcia etc.
Worldwild there were more than 2000 Climate Marches on 29 November.

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Cushions from the Heart
Palma de Mallorca
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
11 Oct 2015

Description: These cushions change lives. In the shape of a heart, they help alleviate the pains that women can suffer after mastectomy surgery. Since 2009, Micky and her team of volunteers have stitched and given away their hearts anonymously and for free to patients in all the hospitals on Mallorca. What began with seven helpers now counts on stitching armies in seven countries.

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Tea and the Refugees
Sóller
By Marisa Candia Cadavid and Carwyn Jones
29 Sep 2015

In 1992, Tea and her family fled the Balkans due to civil war and found refuge in the small village of Sóller, on Mallorca. Now, she and her fellow neighbours have created a citizens’ association, Sóller Amb Els Refugiats, to prepare a welcome to Syrian refugees. The chain of favours continues.

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Medical Services Protest in Spain
Cádiz, Zahara de los Atunes
By Victoria Herranz
18 Jul 2015

SPAIN, on July 19, 2015. A popular protest took place in the small village of Zahara de los Atunes, in Andalucia, to demand more medical services.
Zahara de los Atunes is famous in Spain as a holiday place for many Spanish celebrities. But during the winter, it’s just a small village with less of 1,000 inhabitants. The village does not have 24 hour medical services, no ambulances and the nearest hospital is one hour away.
Language: Spanish

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 53
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (left), 46, from Bolivia, attends a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 52
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (center), 46, from Bolivia, attends a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 54
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, and her friend Graciela (left), walk downstairs to the metro station after attending a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 55
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
17 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez, 46, from Bolivia, travels by metro after attending a birthday celebration at Latin American Women Association in Barcelona, Spain.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 51
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
16 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (center), 46, from Bolivia, visits Leonor (left) and her partner Nixon at her house in Barcelona, Spain. Leonor, a 67-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.