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Children of the guaranà 16
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
24 Mar 2013

A MawŽ woman prepares food and a guaran‡ drink at home. Guaran‡ is the daily, ritual and religious beverage, and it is drunk in large quantities by adults and children alike.

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Children of the guaranà 15
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

The areas where the SaterŽ-MawŽ live are called "s’tio". In this space each family unit has its residence, where a fire is lit both for cooking and for keeping the residents warm (the fire also serves to congregate the family members around it).

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Children of the guaranà 17
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

Guaranatuba village, located alongside of the Andira riverbank. Two young SaterŽ-MawŽ are preparing a powerful sound system for a guaran‡ harvest festival that hosts music, traditional dance and speeches about indigenous culture and politics.

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Children of the guaranà 22
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

A current project underway in the SaterŽ-MawŽ region involves the mapping of forest resources, the construction of a small nursery to produce 5,000 seedlings per year, making plans for the correct use of natural resources, training in techniques of forestry, collection of seeds and production of seedlings, Copaiba oil and Guarana powder.

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Children of the guaranà 07
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

The SaterŽ-MawŽ's name references two animals native in the region. The first word, SaterŽ, means Òburning caterpillarÓ, a reference to their societyÕs most important clan, the one that traditionally appoints the succeeding political rulers. The second word, MawŽ, means Òintelligent and curious parrot.Ó Here, a MawŽ group from various Andir‡ villages is learning something new about the guaran‡ process.

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Children of the guaranà 13
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
23 Mar 2013

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that about 25% of global disease could be prevented by better management of the environment, and identifies deforestation as having a serious impact on human health.

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Children of the guaranà 21
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

Idecidis Da Costa, 60, is the village Tuxaua (village chief). Every village has a Tuxaua, who has the power of solving internal quarrels, summon meetings, scheduling celebrations and rituals. He also plans the agricultural activities and commercial transactions, and orders the building of houses.

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Children of the guaranà 24
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

A man washes his clothes in Guaranatuba. The SaterŽ-MawŽ language is part of the Tupi linguistic branch. But the MawŽ vocabulary contains elements that are entirely different from Tupi, and cannot be related to any other linguistic family. Today most SaterŽ-MawŽ are bilingual. They speak their own language and Portuguese.

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Children of the guaranà 25
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

Paulo is working at Posada Vinte Quilos, a small village for sustainable tourism in Guaranatuba. The project contributes to the improvement of socioeconomic, environmental, and cultural protection of traditional Middle Amazon societies through an inclusive model that integrates institution buildings, the preservation of environmental resources, and activities promoting eco-friendly and sustainable tourism.

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Children of the guaranà 09
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

In their "Sitios" families build their kitchen halfway between the house and the river, where the men roast guaran‡ and the women prepare meals from manioc root. They also have their dock where the family members bathe, wash clothes, soak cassava, wash guaran‡ and land their canoes.

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Children of the guaranà 10
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

MawŽ kids drink guaran‡ in a poor village near Guaranatuba. Much of the guaran‡-based Fair Trade economy aims at battling malnutrition and its consequences for the physical and mental condition of a whole generation of children and adolescents.

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Children of the guaranà 11
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
22 Mar 2013

The SaterŽ-MawŽ of the Lower Amazon are one of the larger indigenous populations in Brazil and one of the few indigenous groups left in the immediate vicinity of the main Amazon River. Due to prolonged contact with the broader Brazilian society, the SaterŽ-MawŽ have been exposed to a variety of historical changes. As a consequence of a staggering demographic growth, the immediate surroundings of their villages have been largely depleted of game and fish, causing chronic food shortages.

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Children of the guaranà 23
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
21 Mar 2013

A man in Pira’ village is fixing his sanitation system. Pira’ is the first MawŽ community one encounters when traveling by boat from Parintins, the closest city.

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Children of the guaranà 06
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
20 Mar 2013

Since 1995 a great deal of hope rests on a fair trade project, which commercializes SaterŽ-MawŽ products such as guaran‡ and several other forest products. Although well established as an indigenous enterprise on an international market, the guaran‡ project still struggles to counter poverty in the villages on a large scale.

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Children of the guaranà 14
Andira River, State Of Amazonas, Brazil
By Francesco Pistilli
20 Mar 2013

A MawŽ moves from village to village using a traditional canoe. Guaran‡ is a plant native to the highlands of the MauŽs-Au River basin, which coincides precisely with the SaterŽ-MawŽ's traditional territory. The SaterŽ-MawŽ have transformed the "Paullinia cupana", a wild vine of the Sapindacea family, into a cultivated shrub, and mastered its planting and processing.

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A Hero For The Strays
Alor Star, Malaysia
By U.S. Editor
11 Mar 2013

Md Azmi Ismail, 55, also known as Pak Mie and his wife Halijah Idris, better known as Mak Intan, 65, are both animal lovers. For the past 20 years Pak Mie and his wife have been tending to the needs of stray animals, especially dogs with diseases such as mange and cataracts.

With their combined love to care for animals in need, the couple established the Pak Mie shelter on a vacant area near the the river in Tanjung Bendshara. The shelter that has been operating for the past 4 years 450 km’s away from Kuala Lumpur. The couple have put in their savings to run the shelter and take donations from campaigning on social media sites such as facebook or via word of mouth. Their facebook page alone has become popular with nearly 5000 “friends” pledging their support to the shelter.

The married couple, volunteers at the shelter and its supporters are not only giving aid to these animals but are also attempting to overturn Malaysians perception that animals such as dogs should be disregarded. Much of this public view stems from some of the Muslim population of Malaysia being taught that touching or having a dog is forbidden. It is acceptable to have a dog as a guard or for hunting but not as a pet, particularly not a domestic pet.

Although Pak Mie and Mak Intan have put in a lot of their own money and time into caring for these stray animals they have drawn the attention of malicious gossip. They have been accused as running the center as a cover to hold donation money. They have also been accused of mistreating the animals and torturing them. Pak Mie and Mak Intan strongly deny all these allegations putting forward that it was only until a video about the center went viral on the internet that they started to receive public donations. Prior to that the family ran the center with their own money.

The Pak Mie shelter now tends to over 700 dogs, over 100 cats, as well as exotic animals such as foxes, squirrels and monkeys in a 200 meters x 30 meters compound shelter. Pak Mie feeds them with at least 5 large bags of rice taking him 3-4 hours to feed them.

The shelter is now family operated bringing in his son to help. Contrary to their efforts the shelter is under investigation from the local authorities and they may have to relocate under the pressure of landowners and local land authorities.

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Cleaning Shrapnel
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
17 Jul 2012

MSF Reconstructive surgical project started in August of 2006 joins three surgical specialties: maxillofacial, orthopedic and plastic, and receives highly complex cases. Over 1700 victims of violence from Iraq, Gaza, Yemen, Libya and Syria have been admitted to MSF surgical project since its start. Admitted patients are those who were directly affected by violence in their home countries, like gunshot, missile and explosion related injuries. The possibility of getting a successful surgical and functional outcome is an essential standard for accepting cases.
The complexity of received cases often requires a multi-staged reconstruction of both hard and soft tissues. This means patients need to stay for a relatively long period of time close to the MSF surgical facility in Amman for monitoring the progress of treatment and for optimal planning of the stages of treatment. This reconstructive surgical project is a highly demanding one at technical level, and requires a skilled surgical, anesthetic and nursing team. Here a MSF surgical team digs shrapnel out of a 10 year old boys knee from Iraq. Amman, Jordan 2012.

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UAE AID
Amman, Jordan
By Osie Greenway
16 Jul 2012

Aid and  food supplies for the displaced Syrian Refugees given by the UAE at the Red Crescent Hospital in Amman, Jordan July, 2012.

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MSF Hospital Restructures for Syrian ...
Amman, Jordan
By U.S. Editor
16 Jul 2012

MSF Reconstructive surgical project started in August of 2006 joins three surgical specialties: maxillofacial, orthopedic and plastic, and receives highly complex cases. Over 1700 victims of violence from Iraq, Gaza, Yemen, Libya and Syria have been admitted to MSF surgical project since its start. Admitted patients are those who were directly affected by violence in their home countries, like gunshot, missile and explosion related injuries. The possibility of getting a successful surgical and functional outcome is an essential standard for accepting cases.
The complexity of received cases often requires a multi-staged reconstruction of both hard and soft tissues. This means patients need to stay for a relatively long period of time close to the MSF surgical facility in Amman for monitoring the progress of treatment and for optimal planning of the stages of treatment. This reconstructive surgical project is a highly demanding one at technical level, and requires a skilled surgical, anesthetic and nursing team.

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Coastal Lagoon Clean-up on Earth Day ...
Coastal Lagoon, Las Pinas, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
18 Jul 2011

Volunteers joined the first organized coastal clean-up last July 17, 2011. Different slippers, sandals and shoes are picked-up during the clean-up.

Two years ago, the coastline Coastal Lagoon, officially known as the Las Piñas Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), more popularly known as Freedom Island is covered with thick garbage and rubbish. Thru the efforts of Wild Birds Club of the Philippines, Save Freedom Island Movement and various environmental NGO’s helped in cleaning the coastal bay and as a result, the coastal lagoon is almost clean now.
The clean-up event at Freedom Island (Las Pinas-Paranaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism area) on April 20, 2013, Saturday, is in celebration of Earth Day which is observed in more than 192 countries every year to promote awareness and appreciation of our environment and to demonstrate support for its protection and restoration.

Freedom Island is the last remaining mangrove frontier in Metro Manila that serves as a sanctuary for avian, terrestrial and marine species. It is home for more than 80 species of migratory and endemic birds, including the already vulnerable Chinese Egret and Philippine Duck. The mangrove ecosystem also serves as a feeding, nesting and nursery grounds for commercially important fish, prawns, mollusks, crabs and shellfish where livelihoods of coastal communities depend. By this virtue, it has been declared as a critical habitat by Proclamation 1412 in 2007 and, also, been recently included in the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance.

However, threats against the bird sanctuary’s existence, such as the controversial reclamation project, relentless dumping of waste and pollution, continue to remain. Thus, more action from the people is needed to protect and restore it.

Said coastal clean-up event is not only a campaign to inspire people to clean up their surroundings but a show of an alarming concern about further environmental depletion. It serves as a call to action to all citizens to take part in saving the environment, as well as a call to the government to act upon the garbage problem and to stop all disastrous reclamation projects. (Source: http://www.facebook.com/events/362286580548042/?fref=ts)

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Libya (35 of 40)
Misrata, Libya
By George Henton
05 Jun 2011

Doctors and other medical volunteers pray during a quiet period at a medical aid centre a few kilometres behind the frontlines at Al Dafniyeh, to the west of Misrata, Libya, 04 June 2011. Badly injured rebel fighters are stabilised at the centre before being taken to Al Hikma, the main hospital in Misrata. GEORGE HENTON.