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8 Izakaya Tengu
Dublin
By Rob_Nolan
06 Feb 2015

Assortment of photos from different music & food events at different locations around Dublin.

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Racy Egyptian Films Persist in the Fa...
Beirut
By Cherine Yazbeck
29 Jan 2015

Beirut, Lebanon

January 29, 2015

After the death of Arab film icons Faten Hamama and Sabah earlier this year, cinema fans revived the memories of what many describe as “la belle époque,” which dated from the 1950s till the mid-1970s.

During this golden age, budgets and standards were considerably high and the progressive state ideology promoted the production of films that were successful throughout the Arab world. This wave benefited from cultural interaction between different Arab societies, a seemingly endless cache of amazing talents and the blessing of a dedicated audience. More significantly, movies reflected liberal societies.

Aboudi Abu Jaoudeh, the director of Al-Furat publishing house, is a collector of Arab film posters. Through this collection, one can understand the prevailing mentality at that time. He explains that since the mid-1970s, filmmakers have steered away from showing explicit content as a result of pressure from producers from the Arabian Gulf.

A recent audiovisual performance titled Gharam wa Intiqam (Love and Revenge), designed by artist Randa Mirza and rapper Wael Kodaih, known as Rayess Beik, revives Arab cinema’s golden era. The show, which is still running in alternative venues, incorporates electronic music into scenes from some of the most iconic Egyptian, Lebanese, and Syrian movies.

This video includes an interview with Sadek Sabbah, a famous Lebanese cinema producer and distributor of Egyptian and Lebanese movies whose company, Sabbah Art Production, was a main contributor of cinematic production in the 1960s and 1970s. He analyses how social change in Egypt has affected the movies and discusses the influence of Islamists on public freedom in Egypt.

Shotlist and Transcript

1 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Abboudi Abou Jawdeh, Director of Al-Furat Publishing House
00:00 – 01:17
I am focusing my interest on Lebanese cinema. I want to archive [the relevant material] accurately.
I love this poster. It features Sabah. Many posters were inspired by Western ones. This one was shows an influence of the movie Gilda, starred by Rita Hayworth. They have reproduced the exact same poster in Lebanon.
When James Bond movies were out, there were spy movies in Lebanon, too. When musical films were produced abroad, musicals were also produced [in Lebanon]. The same trends that appeared in the 1970s… When erotic movies were produced, the same took place in Arab countries and Lebanon between 1970 and 1972 or 1973. The same trends in world or Arab cinema were echoed [in Lebanon]. These trends had a worldwide effect. This includes all aspects [of cinema], from designing poster to producing the movie. This also affected people’s lives.

2 Various of Abboudi Abou Jawdeh examining posters

3 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Abboudi Abou Jawdeh, Director of Al-Furat Publishing House

01:31 – 08:18

01:31
This movie… this poster dates from the 1940s. This is how they designed posters.
In the 1970s and 1980s – the late 1970s and early 1980s – especially when video and new technology appeared, people were able to take movies to their homes. At that time, funding from Saudi Arabia or the Gulf in general was channeled into production. This funding forced its own requirements on production. It imposed certain limits. There was a large-scale consumption of cinematic work, or movies in general, through new broadcasting media; there were new TV stations as well as video.
This financial capital bought a large part of old movies and financed new movies. It laid down new models for work. For example, [investors] require that certain scenes or topics do not appear. There were certain molds that had to contain these movies. Movies that were produced until the 1970s were modified to suit the new display rules. All the kisses were removed from movies, as well as all scenes that were deemed unacceptable. Movies that are being currently shown and that were produced in 1950s, 1960s and 1970s are disfigured.
It was a rare for a director to be able to take control of his own movie. Even earlier, in the 1950s and 1960s, there were directors who suffered in their work and their movies were even censored. They used to be paid per movie. They would receive a certain fee, for example 6,000 or 7,000 Egyptian pounds and would not ask about the movie later. Some producers were in need of money.
I started collecting… one usually has a favorite actor or actresses. I started collecting their photos and posters. After the show, I used to ask workers in the movie theater if there were any posters [that I could take]. I started collecting posters of Western movies. I continued this collection, and later I was interested in cinema magazines, especially in the 1970s… in the early 1970s. Cinema was the main source of entertainment in Lebanon at that time. People from all social classes used to go at least five or six times a year to the movie theater.
When she [Um Kulthum] died, they filmed her funeral and showed part of that footage [in the cinema].
Al-Haram (The Sin) was a movie produced in 1968. It was based on a novel by Youssef Idriss. It is a beautiful story about a female peasant who was a raped by another peasant and did not dare to say anything about it. She did not even tell her husband about this. She died while giving birth. This story is very tragic and can really be described as a story with a social interest. It shows women’s suffering in our Arab societies.
The changes… now there are restrictions that actors, directors, or producers apply to avoid being held accountable. It is not the people who would hold them accountable. [A producer would say,] “I have paid one or two million dollars to produce a TV series; I do not want the government to ban it if I did not remove this or that part.” Producers avoid any trouble to be able to make a profit.
06:42
This poster was designed by artist Hilmi al-Touni. I think that it expresses very beautifully what the movie is about. All the black color… the background represents death while she represents life. The movie’s illustration is done beautifully.
07: 13
Look at this poster. Imagine that this poster was printed in 1955. This is one of the first movies starred by Hind Rustom.
This kind of magazines was printed in Lebanon in 1960s and even in the 1970s. This magazine was distributed in Arab countries. It is called Cinema and Marvels. It was indeed a marvelous magazine!
Interviewer: Do you think it would be possible for such magazines to be printed again in the Arab world?
- No, it is not possible. Some of [these models] were Arab. You would be able to find Arab dancers on magazine covers. It was normal.

4 Various of Metro al-Madina theatre hall and cabaret

5 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Randa Mirza, Artist
08:44
“Our show is called Love and Revenge, the title of a movie starred by Asmahan in 1944. The entire show is based on replaying Arabic songs that date from the 1930s till the 1960s. It features Egyptian, Lebanese and Syrian movies from the same period.“

  1. Various of show. NAT Sound: Music.

7 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Rayyes Beik, Musician
09:25
“I wanted to revive these songs with a new spirit so that I and other people rediscover them. In remixing these songs, I incorporated electronic music. I changed the beat and the length of the songs. The song now has a new face, a new spirit.”

  1. SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Randa Mirza, Artist
    09:55
    “When we return to that era, we realize that we had a great cinematographic and musical production, which had simplicity, aesthetics and experience that now have been lost. We want to bring this era back. Then we would perhaps be able to say, “See where we were and where we are now.”

9 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Rayyes Beik, Musician and Rapper
10:20
“There is a political, economic and artic void. There is a big void in the Arab world.”

10 Wide of posters in Metro al-Madina

11 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Aurelien Zouki, Spectator
10:40
It is really important that they worked on Egyptian movies. This shows our situation back then and what we have now reached. This difference is a bit scary.

12 Various of show. Scenes taken from Kaborya, starred by Ahmadn Zaki and Raghda (9:14).
Scenes feature dancer Tahiya Karioka. Soundtrack , song by Warda al-Jazairiya (11:08); Dancer Samia Jamal (11:39); scenes from film Abi Fawqa al-Shajara, starred by Abdel Halim Hafez and Samia Jamal; soundtrack, Tindam by Widad; film starred by Sleiman Eid

13 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Sadeq Sabbah, Owner of Sabbah Art Production
15:11 – 18:36

I think the change is due to the fact that people’s mindset was affected by the Islamic tide. Part of this was negative. This negative part affected people. It affected their social habits and way of life, which has to do with cinema, what they eat or drink, as well as going out. It has to do with everything. It is not specifically related to cinema. If, in Lebanon for example, I wanted to say that cinema is the mirror of society… I feel that cinema currently is not the mirror of society. If you look at 10 women in the street, you will see that nine of them wear the hijab. However, if we looked at women in Egyptian movies, the ratio would be reversed. Maybe one tenth of them wear a hijab.
Lebanon embraced Egyptian cinema approximately from 1965 to 1975. They [Egyptian filmmakers] discovered three things in Lebanon. First of all, Lebanon is a large studio where there is great scenery. There is the sea, mountains and a nice climate. Media services in Lebanon were – and still are – very distinguished. Egyptians discovered that film production was easy in Lebanon. In addition to that, there were Lebanese actors and actresses present in Lebanon, which complemented Egyptian cinema. More importantly, distribution originated in Lebanon. The distribution revenues were funneled into Lebanon, which created an economic cycle during these 10 years. This facilitated film production. I feel nostalgic about the movie Nagham fi Hayati (A Life Melody), starred by Farid al-Atrash. First of all, I followed my parents work while they produced this movie. Secondly, there was a horrible incident. Farid al-Atrash died during two days before the end of filming, but they [the crew] were able to come up with solutions. It might also have to do with the fact that this was the last movie made in Lebanon – we were talking about these movies made between 1965 and 1975. After that the war broke out. I always have this movie in mind and I always love to watch it. Also, It featured a large group of Lebanese actors, such as Shoushou. There was a large Lebanese cast in this movie. It also featured classical scenery in Lebanon, such as Baalbek, Byblos, the cable cart, which was very important back then. It also featured Tyre. It was as if there Egyptian cinema was bidding Lebanon farewell.

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Manila Nightlife
Manila
By Ralf Falbe
23 Jan 2015

A singer and band performs at a nightclub in Manila, Philippines.

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The Visit 01
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
20 Jan 2015

More than 100 Sufi worshipers and performers of Al-Rashidiya traditional music band gave an ecstatic show titled The Visit at the Tunisian capital’s municipal theater. The spiritual performance, which included traditional Sufi music and dancing, revolved around praising God, Prophet Mohammad and Sufi saints. The performance was directed by Sami Lajmi and featured artists Mohammad Dahlab, Haidar Amir and Munir al-Troudi al-Naat, as well as Sheikhs Mukhtar Bayyoud and Mahdi Abbas.

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The Visit 02
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
20 Jan 2015

More than 100 Sufi worshipers and performers of Al-Rashidiya traditional music band gave an ecstatic show titled The Visit at the Tunisian capital’s municipal theater. The spiritual performance, which included traditional Sufi music and dancing, revolved around praising God, Prophet Mohammad and Sufi saints. The performance was directed by Sami Lajmi and featured artists Mohammad Dahlab, Haidar Amir and Munir al-Troudi al-Naat, as well as Sheikhs Mukhtar Bayyoud and Mahdi Abbas.

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The Visit 03
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
20 Jan 2015

More than 100 Sufi worshipers and performers of Al-Rashidiya traditional music band gave an ecstatic show titled The Visit at the Tunisian capital’s municipal theater. The spiritual performance, which included traditional Sufi music and dancing, revolved around praising God, Prophet Mohammad and Sufi saints. The performance was directed by Sami Lajmi and featured artists Mohammad Dahlab, Haidar Amir and Munir al-Troudi al-Naat, as well as Sheikhs Mukhtar Bayyoud and Mahdi Abbas.

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The Visit 06
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
20 Jan 2015

More than 100 Sufi worshipers and performers of Al-Rashidiya traditional music band gave an ecstatic show titled The Visit at the Tunisian capital’s municipal theater. The spiritual performance, which included traditional Sufi music and dancing, revolved around praising God, Prophet Mohammad and Sufi saints. The performance was directed by Sami Lajmi and featured artists Mohammad Dahlab, Haidar Amir and Munir al-Troudi al-Naat, as well as Sheikhs Mukhtar Bayyoud and Mahdi Abbas.

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The Visit 07
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
20 Jan 2015

More than 100 Sufi worshipers and performers of Al-Rashidiya traditional music band gave an ecstatic show titled The Visit at the Tunisian capital’s municipal theater. The spiritual performance, which included traditional Sufi music and dancing, revolved around praising God, Prophet Mohammad and Sufi saints. The performance was directed by Sami Lajmi and featured artists Mohammad Dahlab, Haidar Amir and Munir al-Troudi al-Naat, as well as Sheikhs Mukhtar Bayyoud and Mahdi Abbas.

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The Visit 09
Tunis, Tunisia
By Zaid Abbour
20 Jan 2015

More than 100 Sufi worshipers and performers of Al-Rashidiya traditional music band gave an ecstatic show titled The Visit at the Tunisian capital’s municipal theater. The spiritual performance, which included traditional Sufi music and dancing, revolved around praising God, Prophet Mohammad and Sufi saints. The performance was directed by Sami Lajmi and featured artists Mohammad Dahlab, Haidar Amir and Munir al-Troudi al-Naat, as well as Sheikhs Mukhtar Bayyoud and Mahdi Abbas.

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'Islam Chipsy' Brings Egyptian Electr...
Beirut
By Joe Lukawski
04 Dec 2014

Egyptian 'shaaby' (pop) music phenomenon Islam Chipsy has begun taking the indie electronic music scene by storm. From the streets of Cairo to international stages, his take on Egyptian wedding-pop, known locally as ‘mahraganat,’ (festival music) combines Arab beats with hardcore drumming and phrenetic electro keyboard melodies that sound like someone's old Nintendo gaming system has been possessed by a flamboyant Egyptian groomsman. Chipsy, however, is a self-taught virtuoso keyboardist and a wonder to watch live.

In December, Islam Chipsy played in Beirut at the Beirut & Beyond International Music Festival while touring in the Middle East and Europe, making stops in France, Germany, Switzerland and in various Scandinavian cities. The global appeal of his music perhaps comes from its proclivity towards all-out partying, however, his stop in Beirut was special.

“People [here] are excited to see us; they have received us well,” he said. “Being in this country is like seeing your brother who wants to know how you are doing. So you feel that you speak with each other through music, not with words.”

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'Islam Chipsy' Brings Egyptian Electr...
Beirut
By Joe Lukawski
03 Dec 2014

FULLY PRODUCED VIDEO (07:21) -- TEXTLESS AND SUBTITLED VERSIONS AVAILABLE

Egyptian shaaby (pop) music phenomenon Islam Chipsy has begun taking the indie electronic music scene by storm. From the streets of Cairo to international stages, his take on Egyptian wedding-pop, known locally as ‘mahraganat,’ (festival music) combines Arab beats with hardcore drumming and phrenetic electro keyboard melodies that sound like someone's old Nintendo gaming system has been possessed by a flamboyant Egyptian groomsman. Chipsy, however, is a self-taught virtuoso keyboardist and a wonder to watch live.

In December, Islam Chipsy played in Beirut at the Beirut & Beyond International Music Festival while touring in the Middle East and Europe, making stops in France, Germany, Switzerland and in various Scandinavian cities. The global appeal of his music perhaps comes from its proclivity towards all-out partying, however, his stop in Beirut was special.

“People [here] are excited to see us; they have received us well,” he said. “Being in this country is like seeing your brother who wants to know how you are doing. So you feel that you speak with each other through music, not with words.”

Director of the Beirut & Beyond Festival Amani Semaan first heard the young Egyptian artist on YouTube.

“[Lebanese audiences] have heard about him and they know there is something special about him,” she said. “They want to watch him, especially since this kind of music does not exist in Beirut. Islam Chipsy started his career in weddings; he has performed professionally on stage only six or seven times. He only started his professional career effectively only now. Everyone is excited to see him, especially musicians. They are looking forward to discovering something new.”

Hailing from Imbaba, a section of Cairo known for outdoor wedding parties, and also for being very conservative, Chipsy and his two drummers Islam and Khalid have invented just that. Totally improvised, their music is largely the result of Islam Chipsy’s signature playing style, developed while playing in the wedding circuit.

“I started searching and experimenting for two years and without showing anyone what I was doing,” he said. “A friend of mine put me on stage to DJ. It was very weird to have a keyboard on stage without a band. I started this technique as a kind of joke. In weddings people were very crazy. They would take their clothes off and dance. So I went along and used my technique. They responded very well and were on fire. I had a lot of work offers and I started to develop my technique, which became famous.”

However, Islam Chipsy doesn’t chalk up his music to where he and his bandmates come from. Early on, while still playing alongside wedding DJs and beginning to discover just how open people were to new music styles, he was propelled by a wish to see the world.

“Whenever I was asked ‘Why do you do this kind of work?’ I would say that I wish to travel around the world,” he adds. “I didn’t have any papers or anything else but it was a dream that I tried to realize and I succeeded, thanks be to God. When Islam and Khalid participated in this, this gave me more strength and energy and my music was renovated. We were able to create a lot of new music together.”

With two drummers playing loud, full drum sets on stage, and Chipsy in the middle practically beating up his keyboard, the live experience is loud, high-energy, and yet totally danceable. Taking their act from the streets of Imbaba to the stage was a risk for the group, but one that paid off.

“It was rather unusual,” Chipsy said. “Any band needs to have one set of drums, while the rest of the instruments would be tablah or tambourine if it was an oriental band, or you could have a guitar. But to have a keyboard and two sets of drums and be able to accomplish something that a large band cannot was something very difficult. It was a dream but we were able to realize it.”

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It's All in Lebanon (French)
Beirut
By Charaf
25 Nov 2014

2011
Beirut, Lebanon

Since the end of the Lebanese civil war in 1990, Lebanon has become a hot bed of both entertainment and news media production in the Arab world. Amongst the melee of risque Arabic music videos and luxury television commercials, the Shia political movement Hezbollah has proved to be one of the most media savvy institutions in the country, using film, television, music, and masterful political stagecraft to further its image in the minds of Lebanese and the international community. From the flashy music videos of Haifa Wehbe to the resistance videos of Hezbollah, this film follows the tumultuous post-civil war history of Lebanon through its fertile media industry.

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Paraguay's Garbage Dump Orchestra
Catuera
By foschiceleste
31 Oct 2014

FULL ARTICLE IN ENGLISH UPON REQUEST
ARTICLE COMPLET EN FRANÇAIS DISPONIBLE

Catuera is home to the largest landfill in Asuncion, the capital of Paraguay. Here, a young orchestra defies all odds, making their instruments from garbage. Despite the extreme poverty in which most residents of Catuera live - in cardboard, wood and sheet-metal shanties and exposed to numerous health and safety hazards - this orchestra allows young people from eight to twenty-two years-old to access culture and also to improve the living conditions of their families. This may well prove that the trash of some is treasure to others.

The project began in 2006 when Favio Chevez Morán, an environmental engineer and music afficianado working in the neighborhood, began to teach music to the youth of Cateura with the help of Nicolás Gómez (known to locals as Don Cola), a recycler who makes instruments out of trash, and a young French volunteer. There are parallels here between recycler and artist. Both seek something in the trash to give it new significance, new life. Little by little, their efforts transformed informal music classes into a long-term project: an orchestra, a new challenge for these young people.

The project’s success led the American heavy-metal group Metallica to invite the orchestra to join them on their South American tour this year. Since then, they have played more and more concerts, sharing a unique musical experience in Paraguay as well as Germany, Spain, Austria and countries around the world.


L'Orchestre des Instruments Recyclés de Cateura, Paraguay


A Cateura, le décharge plus grande d’Asunción, la Capitale du Paraguay, une orchestre défi les limites de l’impossible en faisant ses instruments à partir de déchets. Même si la plupart des habitants vit en situation d’extrême pauvreté, dans des maisons en carton, en bois et en tôle, exposés à de nombreux dangers, cet orchestre a permis aux jeunes de 8 a 22 ans d'accéder à la culture et aussi d'améliorer les conditions de vie de ses familles. Cela prouve que les déchets des uns peuvent être la richesse des autres.

Ce projet commence en 2006 quand Favio Chavez Morán, un technicien environnemental amateur de musique qui travaille dans ce quartier défavorisé, commence à enseigner la musique aux enfants et aux jeunes de Cateura, aidé par Nicolás Gómez (alias Don Cola), un recycleur, qui fabrique les instruments avec les ordures et un jeune volontaire français qui collabore avec l'organisation. De cette manière, on peut dire qu’il y a des parallèles entre un recycleur et un artiste, ils cherchent des choses dans les ordures pour leur donner une nouvelle signification, une valeur différente. Peu à peu, avec l'effort et le travail de tous, les classes de musique sont devenues un projet à long terme: un orchestre. Et aussi un nouveau défi pour ces jeunes.

Le succès a commencé avec l’invitation de Metallica à participer à la tournée de concerts en Amérique du Sud cette année. Depuis lors, les concerts sont de plus en plus nombreux, au Paraguay comme à l'étranger, en Allemagne, en Espagne, en Autriche, ils parcourent différents pays et transmettent cette expérience unique.

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Qalandiya Festival: Celebrating Pales...
West Bank
By adrian
08 Oct 2014

October 2014,
West Bank, Palestine

The second 'Qalandiya International' contemporary arts biennial drew to a close on Thursday 13 November after nearly a month of exhibitions, performances, installations, conferences and film screenings. Held in cities across 'Historic Palestine', the festival brought together more than 100 Palestinian and international artists to respond to issues relating to Palestinian life, politics and history. Over recent years, various Palestinian contemporary artists have been the recipients of major international awards. Amongst others, Emily Jacir won the Golden Lion at the 2007 Venice Biennial and Mona Hattoum was awarded the Prize Joan Miro in Barcelona in 2011. Earlier, critically acclaimed Palestinian film-maker Elia Suleiman had won the Jury Prize at the 2002 Cannes Film festival. Despite the ever-growing international profile of Palestinian contemporary arts, Qalandiya International is one of the first attempts to launch a regular contemporary arts festival within Palestine itself. Taking place amidst ongoing violence in Jerusalem and following soon after the killing of more than 2000 Palestinians over the summer in Gaza, it was unsure at one stage whether the festival should go ahead as planned. Yet organisers decided to push ahead in the spirit of 'sumoud' (steadfastness), and to some people these artistic interventions continued to demonstrate the significant role that Palestinian art and culture has played in the context of resistance since the days of Ghassan Kanafani, Mahmoud Darwish and Naji al-Ali.

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Art as Resistance in Palestine
Palestine
By Rich Wiles
06 Oct 2014

Arts and culture have always figured significantly within the wider context of Palestinian resistance. People such as Mahmoud Darwish, Ghassan Kanafani and Naji al-Ali took Palestine to the world through their art many decades ago, and their work - shaped heavily by the Palestinian experience of exile - lives on today.

Cultural aspects of resistance have developed over the decades and traditional practices of poetry, literature and dabke are now accompanied by street art, hip hop, modern dance and contemporary art. New styles and practices have evolved - often influenced by today's globalized world - but in many ways still maintaining a distinctly Palestinian edge.

Whilst links between Darwish's poetry or Naji al-Ali's immortal 'Handala' and today's hip hop groups or street artists may not seem immediate to the uninformed, the context is shaped by the same core issues. The Palestinian story of exile and the struggle against it remain a constant and inherent focus of Palestinian arts and cultural practice today, much as it did amongst earlier practitioners who had themselves lived, and survived the Nakba.

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Los Vivancos: On Tour with the Fastes...
Bangkok
By GonzaloAbad
28 Sep 2014

The Spanish dance group Los Vivancos are presently touring their new creation "AETERNUM," an extreme Flamenco fusion. Los Vivancos have the fastest feet in the world, holding a Guinness World Record of 1317 steps executed in 60 seconds. The brothers take time to reflect on their work while touring their show in Bangkok, Thailand.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 01
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The Circus Bidone was born in France in 1976. Maintained by Francois Bidone, until today is the last itinerant circus that still moves with horses and carriages in the Berry area. The crew is formed by 7 carriages, 8 horses, one mule, one donkey, 8 artists, one responsible, one monkey, one henhouse and Francois Bidone.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 02
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The story about Francois Bidone is based on an itinerant life began in May '68 in France. His hands gave birth to the first carriage and then the next five. Francois is responsible with Benedicte about the whole organization: from the construction of new structures to the show at the choice of artists. Currently there are over forty years that Bidone Circus is in operation.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 03
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Laura is an italian artist of the theater circus. She is traveling with the circus from 4 years. She moved permanently to France and with Freddi, is the only girl in the company.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 04
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Nico and Freddo try the instruments during a break. Guitar and Fisarmonica accompany the circus troupe during moments of work and stall.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 05
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Laura is an aereal dancer. During the show she does two aerial performance with a tissue and with the hoop. Every day she has to fix the "verghe", the structure where they hung the tools available for her number.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 06
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

In moments of telage, great part of the equipment is disassembled and ready for departure, the artists eat fast food all together before going back to work.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 07
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Toma, french guy, is on road with Bidon’s Circus for a year. He mainly deals with parks horses and keeps responsibility throughout torunee. He has a wild personality and brings much cheerfulness in to the company.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 08
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

During the summer tornee rarely reprove parts of the show, called "returns". During some afternoon hours Francois follows the company giving advice about improving some numbers.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 09
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The Barrique is a carriage built by Francois for his son and is currently occupied by Freddo, musician of the company. When he has some free time he’s playing or practicing juggling with clubs, another of his passion.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 10
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

The oldest carriage circus called La Vielle and is currently occupied by Laura and Pippo, couple both on stage and in personal life. Carriages are small and contain everything needed to an itinerant life; from clothes for the show to life memories.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 11
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

During the breaks Laura exercising with Fisarmonica, her great passion. She would like in the future to integrate it into one of her numbers. During the winter period she’s always looking for new job opportunities.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 12
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Pippo is a juggler and musician and he’s for more years at work with the circus Bidone. He’s always available when there is work. Pippo is very caring and responabile to the whole structure of the circus.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 13
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Coco is the clown of the company. Lives in the carriage Clarabelle, the only one built by a midget and not by Francois. Very young he’s the first year of employment with the circus. He’s quiet and peaceful person during daily life but becomes an excellent clown during the show.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 14
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Once the circus is located inside the municipal areas the show are programmed each day. The duration of a show is two hours. Artists must follow strictly the lineup and can not change the numbers.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 15
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Davelle is a Spanish guy on the first year of employment with the circus Bidone. He is represented as a juggler and as a clown. He knows how to mix the two techniques making fun and magical numbers.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 16
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Spaces used for backstage change depending on different locations. Sometimes the company can rely on wide spaces and sometimes they must be adapted. The carriages are used like a fifth stage.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 18
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Laura gets ready for the scene of Marionette while Toma waiting to prepare the horses. Carriage are very important in the show being the only ones available for costume changes.

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Roadside with Cirque Bidon 19
Noyer-sur-cher, Frace
By Arianna Pagani
20 Aug 2014

Marcelo is the handyman of the company, one who helps and manages the technical parts. Here, through an umbrella, help Laura to switch between carriage without being seen by the audience.He’s alongside circus from 7 years.

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12 Smock Alley Theatre
Dublin
By Rob_Nolan
09 Aug 2014

Assortment of photos from different music & food events at different locations around Dublin.

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Sonar 2014, the 21st edition of the I...
Barcelona
By Biel Calderon
08 Jul 2014

The 21st edition of SONAR the International Festival of Advanced Music and New Media Art was held in Barcelona from June 12 to June 14, 2014. Thousands of people flocked to Barcelona for three days of music performances, workshops, technology showcases and, of course, a lot of partying.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Huge plumes of smoke reach to the sky as followers of Tian Du Yuanshuai set off a mass of firecrackers under a figurine of the deity. The devotees then beat on a drum and march forth.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Devotees of Tian Du Yuanshuai, faces blackened by ash. They have been carrying an effigy of Marshal Tian Du through the streets, occasionally setting off huge numbers of firecrackers under the effigy and standing right next to the explosion as it rocks the area and covers them in ash.