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Asylum Seekers in Spain 51
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
16 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (center), 46, from Bolivia, visits Leonor (left) and her partner Nixon at her house in Barcelona, Spain. Leonor, a 67-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 04
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (left), 46, from Bolivia, makes up Josefina's face, at Sant Joan Despí Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. Josefina, a 96-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of elder and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 06
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Bolivian national Gilda Arnez (left), 46, visits Fina and others at her former job at Sant Joan Despí­ Hospital, in Barcelona.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 49
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, visits Maravillas at her house in Cornellà, Barcelona, Spain. Maravillas, a 90-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 50
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, visits Maravillas at her house in Cornellà, Barcelona, Spain. Maravillas, a 90-year-old woman, used to be taken care by Gilda few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of old and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 05
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
15 Jun 2015

Gilda Arnez (right), 46, from Bolivia, visits Gustavo (center) at Clinica Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe in Esplugues de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. Gilda used to be his caregiver few years ago.
Gilda Arnez migrated to Barcelona for economical reasons in 2004. She left three children back in Bolivia and wanted to improve their future while working in Europe and sending them money. However, life in Spain has not been so good as she expected and she has been working in many small jobs, mostly taking care of elder and disabled people. Now that she has legal residency in Spain, she would like to bring her children.

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German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

Frame 0004
German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

Frame 0004
German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.