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Republic of Congo: Love Elegance Pride
Brazzaville
By Patrick
08 Mar 2016

On March 24th, Dennis Sassou Nguesso won the presidential election in the Republic of Congo, making him one the oldest rulers in the continent after winning a referendum last September that changed the constitution, allowing candidates aged over 70 and scrapping the two-term limit. But this small Central African country has a cultural movement that transcends politics and aims to become a national symbol.

Yves François Ngatsongo, also known locally by the nickname Yves Saint Laurent, after the world famous fashion designer, is president of “France Libre”, the first association of Sapeur in the Republic of Congo. “La Sape” (Societé des Ambianceurs et Personnes Elegantes) was born during the colonial years.

What started as a resistance movement toward French ruling quickly became one of Brazzaville´s most characteristic symbols, to the point that Irish beer Guinness used them in one of their commercials as a symbol of authenticity. Taxi drivers, teachers or artisans spend their little wages in expensive clothes from Europe to be part of these African dandies.

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La Sape in Congo 05
Brazzaville
By Patrick
08 Mar 2016

Sape is becoming increasingly popular among women. They adopt all the “man” attitude that goes with “La Sape”, including the dress code.

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La Sape in Congo 18
Brazzaville
By Patrick
08 Mar 2016

On March 8th, sapeurs from different countries took part in a festival to help promote women sapeurs as part of the International Women´s Day.

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La Sape in Congo 19
Brazzaville
By Patrick
08 Mar 2016

Republic of Congo and DRC have a never ending battle on where “La Sape” was invented. Despite past tensions, this international festival aimed to put aside those differences and bring the two countries closer.

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La Sape in Congo 20
Brazzaville
By Patrick
08 Mar 2016

“L´Hotel de Préfecture” in Brazzaville became the scenario for this international gathering where Sapeurs from different countries walked the red carpet.

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La Sape in Congo 21
Brazzaville
By Patrick
08 Mar 2016

Yves François Ngatsongo and “La France Libre” did not miss the opportunity to witness this unique event.

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La Sape in Congo 22
Brazzaville
By Patrick
08 Mar 2016

Whereas “Sape” from Republic of Congo has a more classic style, DRC is more extravagant.

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La Sape in Congo 23
Brazzaville
By Patrick
08 Mar 2016

Fulizioni from Paris surrounded by supporters.

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La Sape in Congo 24
Brazzaville
By Patrick
08 Mar 2016

Ahmed Yalla is a wealthy business man that a few years ago decided to promote “La Sape”. Known as “crocodile man” and widely acclaimed as President of all sapeurs, he organised this international festival.

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La Sape in Congo 16
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Mar 2016

Yves François Ngatsongo at Maya Maya international Aeroport waiting for the arrival of Paris diaspora.

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La Sape in Congo 17
Brazzaville
By Patrick
04 Mar 2016

Sapeurs from France, DRC and Ivory Coast came to Brazzaville to be part of the festival that took place on the International Women´s Day.

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La Sape in Congo 02
Brazzaville
By Patrick
27 Feb 2016

“La France Libre” can be hired to promote any kind of activities. In this case, The Ministry of Culture hired its members to go to Brazzaville´s only university, Marien Ngouab, and promote a conference by Beninese speaker Innocent Peya.

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La Sape in Congo 03
Brazzaville
By Patrick
27 Feb 2016

From left to right Yolande, Blandine and “First Lady” Pelagie, Yves François Ngatsongos wife.

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La Sape in Congo 08
Brazzaville
By Patrick
27 Feb 2016

Disagreements are very common when money is distributed. Thibaud argues with other members of “La France Libre”.

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La Sape in Congo 12
Brazzaville
By Patrick
26 Feb 2016

He lives in the outskirts of Brazzaville selling pots for up to $50 a piece.

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La Sape in Congo 07
Brazzaville
By Patrick
21 Feb 2016

Whoever hires them agrees on a fee and covers for transportation and drinks.

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La Sape in Congo 09
Brazzaville
By Patrick
17 Feb 2016

Thibaud is a taxi driver. He makes around $25 per day after paying the owner of the taxi.

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La Sape in Congo 11
Brazzaville
By Patrick
17 Feb 2016

Chameleon (right) with his family. He´s a respected member within “La France Libre”.

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La Sape in Congo 13
Brazzaville
By Patrick
17 Feb 2016

Most Sapeurs keep a family tradition that sometimes can be traced back to their grand-fathers. Chameleon´s daughter Reine wants to follow the footstep of his father.

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La Sape in Congo 01
Brazzaville
By Patrick
14 Feb 2016

Yves François Ngatsongo founded “La France Libre” in 1996, becoming the first association of Sapeurs in the Republic of Congo.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 12
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
22 Apr 2015

'Fodoy', from Gambia, attends practicals lessons of sewing by the owner (left) of a workshop in Barcelona, Spain. He has experience as a tailor back in his country and he wants to develop his skills. 'Fodoy' is a nickname for this migrant from Gambia, who arrived to Barcelona in 2007 without residence permit. He fled the country due to political prosecution and departed in a boat to Canary Islands. Then, the Spanish authorities reallocated him to Valencia and then to Barcelona. His asylum request has been blocked until 2017 due to having been condemned for drugs dealing. Until then, he is struggling to find accommodation and to have income to survive, although organizations such as CCAR assist him from time to time.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 13
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
22 Apr 2015

'Fodoy', from Gambia, attends practicals lessons of sewing in a workshop in Barcelona, Spain. He has experience as a tailor back in his country and he wants to develop his skills. 'Fodoy' is a nickname for this migrant from Gambia, who arrived to Barcelona in 2007 without residence permit. He fled the country due to political prosecution and departed in a boat to Canary Islands. Then, the Spanish authorities reallocated him to Valencia and then to Barcelona. His asylum request has been blocked until 2017 due to having been condemned for drugs dealing. Until then, he is struggling to find accommodation and to have income to survive, although organizations such as CCAR assist him from time to time.

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La Sape in Congo 15
Brazzaville
By Patrick
02 Apr 2015

Master Kif has been a tailor for more than 20 years. He runs a small shop in Brazzaville.

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La Sape in Congo 14
Brazzaville
By Patrick
01 Apr 2015

As the world capital of “La Sape”, Brazzaville has dozens of clothing stores like “Paris luxe” where almost any imported item can be found.

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La Sape in Congo 06
Brazzaville
By Patrick
21 Mar 2015

Sapeurs can also be hired by anyone to promote personal events. “Tapise” during the opening of a night club in Ouenze, Brazzaville.

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La Sape in Congo 04
Brazzaville
By Patrick
15 Mar 2015

Pelagie was one of the first women to embrace “La Sape”. She wants to create the first women association, “La Déese”. This will give her legitimacy and the opportunity to be hired by the Ministry of Culture.

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La Sape in Congo 10
Brazzaville
By Patrick
15 Mar 2015

He´s a clear example of what being a Sapeur means to some Congolese who make barely enough to provide for their families. Thibaud´s been saving more than a year to buy a pair of shoes. “It´s a way of life, makes you stand out”.

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Yazidi Tailoring for Women
Dohuk
By rsoufi
09 Sep 2014

September 6, 2014
Dohuk, Iraq

A Yazidi tailor has established a sewing workshop for traditional handmade clothes for Yazidi women. In their escape from marauding ISIS fighters, many women tore their clothes. Since the traditional Yazidi dress is not available in shops or the market, the workshop was established to enable women to preserve their cultural identity. The outfit has a special traditional and religious value, representing peace and purity.

Transcription:

SOUNDBITE1: Hadeya, Seamstress (woman, Kurdish)
(00:38 - 02:11) “These are the traditional outfits of Yazidi women. We are sewing them here because they are not available in the market. The design of these clothes is very unique because they have a ring called a “took” and it is a symbol for the Yazidi outfit. We will always wear this type of clothing, especially the elderly who wear white outfits, which represents purity and clarity. This is how we view our religion, as pure. I am very pleased to be doing this job because it helps us maintain our culture. We provide these clothes for free, because the person who launched this project (Ali Ezideen), did it so he can provide this service for people without for anything in return. We, as seamstresses, do not get paid. We are volunteers. We work on approximately 32 pieces per day and we meet with 20-40 women everyday. We are 6-7 volunteers in this project. We established this workshop because most of the clothes of the Yazidi women got torn while they were fleeing Sinjar to escape the ISIS terror, and this outfit is not available in the market.”

SOUNDBITE 2: Vati, Seamstress (woman, Kurdish)
(03:27-08:48) “We are volunteer seamstresses. I am very happy to contribute in this work because it serves the Yazidi religion and its followers. Also it helps maintain our cultural heritage since it represents the purity of our religion, I ask everyone to help us protect our religion.”

SOUNDBITE 3: Fayez, Yazidi volunteer (man, Arabic)
(03:27-08:48) “When they were in the mountain, it was very hard. There were no bathroom, or places to sleep, or even food, so the outfits got ruined because of sleeping on the floor and they were all torn. So Ali Ezdeen thought that Yazidi women must be really tired after this hard trip and their clothes are ruined, so he purchased an amount of fabric that we can turn into Yazidi outfits. Then they will be distributed among the women. I supervise the work of the seamstresses and Ali is responsible for the whole project. Here we have two seamstresses, one designer, and three people to take the measurements and the sizes. We go and take the sizes of the old women in the camps and the people who came from Sinjar and are staying in the unfinished buildings, then tailor these outfits and distribute them.”

Interviewer: What are the ages and categories that you tailor for?
“Only for the elderly, the younger generation can wear any type of clothes, but the old women cannot. It is a tradition, and it is very hard to find.”

Interviewer: What is the significance of these outfits for the Yazidi woman?
“First of all, the color: the old Yazidi women only wear white, it is a tradition that the elderly in the Yazidi religion should wear white. It is a symbol for the religion.”

Interviewer: What is the difference between this outfit and any other outfit you can find in the market?
“The difference is you cannot find these outfits in the market, they have to be tailored upon request and they cannot be found in ay shop. The Yazidis are a minority, and their outfits are not widely produced. They do not come from Europe like every other outfit. They are very rare.”

Interviewer: Is it considered a good thing to wear this kind of outfits?
“Yes to wear this is a good thing, and they do not wear anything but those outfits. It is mentioned in our book that the blue color is forbidden for the elderly.”

Interviewer: But you are wearing blue
“Yes but as I said, it is only forbidden for the elderly.”

Interviewer: How many pieces do you tailor per day?
“About 32-40”

Interviewer: Is it for men and women?
“No only for women.” Interviewer: What do you ask from people?
“I ask for help from anyone who can to help this religion, because it has suffered a lot throughout the years. I wish everyone can do charity work and help other such as Ali Ezdeen. This person donated everything he has for the Yazidi refugees.”

Interviewer: Do you consider this work as a service for your religion?
“Yes of course, we feel like we are helping ourselves by doing this kind of work, it is different from when someone gives you money or a place to stay. We feel like we are helping ourselves by working in this workshop.”

SOUNDBITE 4: Yazidi woman standing in front of the tent with a child (woman, Kurdish)
(10:36-11:13) Interviewer: Why are you wearing white?
“It is our custom and our culture.”

Interviewer: How so?
“It is the culture of the Yazidis”

Interviewer: Do you always wear this outfit?
“Yes”

SOUNDBITE 5: Yazidi woman (woman, Kurdish)
“I am very content with our outfits, it is our cultural heritage, and while we were coming through the mountain, most of our clothes got torn, but still I will always wear the white outfit.”

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Rise in the Manufacturing of Military...
baghdad
By Reda Kareem
09 Jul 2014

لم نعمل هكذا منذ ايام حرب ايران (الحرب العراقية الايرانية)، يقول ابو محمد، الرجل الذي يبلغ من العمر نحو ستين عاما، والذي يعمل في خياطة الملابس العسكرية منذ اكثر من خمسة واربعين سنة. "نحن الان نخيط من خمسة وثلاثين الى اربعين بدلة عسكرية يوما، كنا نخيط ثلاثة فقط في الايام العادية"، يضيف الرجل بنبرة اعتزاز ”أعتبر هذا جزءا من الالتزام بفتوى الجهاد التي اعلنها المرجع الاعلى"، في اشارة الى المرجع الشيعي علي السيستاني، وفتواه بـ"الجهاد الكفائي"، التي اطلقها بعد اجتياح مسلحين سنة لاغلب اجزاء محافظتي نينوى وصلاح الدين، واجزاء كبيرة من الانبار، والاطراف الغربية من ديالى، والشرقية من كركوك، لكن لايبدو ان الجانب الديني هو وحده الذي يجعل ابا محمد متحمسا هكذا. "كان سعر البدلة الواحدة ستين الف دينار (نحو 40 دولارا)، لكنه الان اصبح ثمانين الفا (60 دولارا)"، يتابع ابو محمد "تجار القماش هم اصل البلاء، فانا لم ارفع سعر اجرة عملي، لكنهم رفعوا سعر المتر من القماش العسكري ثلاثة اضعاف، بعد ان كان باربعة دولارات، هو الان باثني عشر دولارا". وبحسبة بسيطة، فان ابا محمد يجني اكثر من تسعمائة دولار يوميا، وهو مبلغ مرتفع بالنسبة لارباح يومية في العراق، "اشغل ستة عاملين، وادفع اجور الكهرباء المرتفعة، واتحمل تهديدات من مسلحين"، يقول ابو محمد مبررا. وقد يكون الجزء الاخير صحيحا، اذ قام مسلحون مجهولون يوم الاربعاء 25 حزيران، بتفجير محلات تعمل بخياطة البدلات العسكرية، في منطقة الباب الشرقي، وسط بغداد، وهي منطقة قريبة لمنطقة علاوي الحلة التي يعمل بها ابو محمد، لكن هذا لايبدو كافيا لجعل ابا محمد واصحاب نحو 15 عشر معمل خياطة في المنطقة التي يعمل بها، يرفعون اعينهم من على مكائن الخياطة، التي يعملون عليها من الصباح وحتى ساعة متاخرة ليلا. ويقول الرجل الستيني "نحن نخيط البدلات لمختلف صنوف القوات المسلحة، الصحرواي لقوات الجيش العادية، والازرق بتدرجاته لقوات الشرطة والشرطة الاتحادية، والاسود للقوات الخاصة"، لكن البدلة التي كان يخيطها في يده كانت باللون الاخضر المرقط "انها للمتطوعين، وتشكل مبيعاتها نحو 95 بالمائة من مبيعاتنا". يؤكد ابو محمد انه يطلب هوية تعريف قبل بيع بدلات الضباط، او رتبهم العسكرية، لكن باقي البدلات تباع بدون هويات "لاتوجد ضمانات من تسربها الى الميليشيات او المسلحين"، يقول ابو محمد، لكنه يستدرك "نحاول ان نسالهم عن وحداتهم او اية معلومات اخرى". الضابط في الجيش السابق، والمحلل الامني، عدنان نعمة سلمان، يحذر من ان "الميليشيات والقاعدة شنوا هجمات كثيرة بازياء الجيش العراقي التي استعملوها للتمويه وضمان عدم المقاومة في المناطق التي تسيطر عليها الحكومة". ويلفت سلمان ايضا الى ان "اعداد المتطوعين الكبيرة قد تكون عبئا على الجيش"، مبينا ان "في فترة الحرب العراقية الايرانية كان الجندي من الجيش الشعبي يحتاج الى ثلاثة جنود نظاميين لحمايته، كما ان حركة المتطوعين بطيئة، والتزامهم قليل"، ويؤكد ان "اعداد المتطوعين الكبيرة لن تؤدي الى حلحلة الاوضاع سريعا". لكن الجندي في القوات الخاصة، حمزة احمد، الذي كان يخيط بدلة له هو وزميل اخر، يقول ان تطوع الالاف من المواطنين اسهم بعدم انهيار الجيش معنويا، مع انه يعترف “أفضل القتال برفقة جندي نظامي واحد، على القتال مع خمسة متطوعين”. ويؤكد احمد ان "المتطوعين لم ينشروا في الاماكن الحساسة، او الوحدات الخاصة، وان دورهم اقتصر على اسناد فرق والوية المشاة الخفيفة"، فيما تحدث زميله الذي رفض كشف اسمه عن "ازمة طعام بدأت معسكرات التدريب في الجيش العراقي تعاني منها، بسبب الاعداد الهائلة للمتطوعين". ويقول الجندي في القوات الخاصة "ذهبنا الى معسكر تدريب التاجي، وجدنا حشودا من المتطوعين تتجمع حول فرن للصمون (الخبز العراقي)، الكثير منهم مدوا ايديهم الى داخل الفرن قبل ان ينضج الخبز، وتحملوا الاكتواء بالنار بسبب الجوع". خياط اخر في هذا السوق، المعروف بسوق الزرملي، يشهد عمله ازدهارا ايضا بسبب هذه الاوضاع، حازم الشويلي يعمل بخياطة الاعلام العشائرية واعلام الوحدات العسكرية بالاضافة طبعا الى العلم العراقي، ومن غير ان يدري، تبين الاحصاءات التي يطرحها حازم، مايبدو تغيرا في المزاج العام العراقي. "قبل الاحداث كانت مبيعات العلم العراقي مزدهرة، كان دائما المكون الثابت في اي قائمة مبيعات"، ويوضح "قادة الجيش مثلا كانوا يطلبون العلم العراقي بحجم كبير، ثم راية وحداتهم ورمزها بحجم اصغر قليلا، والشيوخ القبليون كانوا يخيطون العلم العراقي باحجام كبيرة، ويخيطون معها رايات تمثل رموز قبائلهم والوانها، قبيلتي الشويلات مثلا"، يبين حازم، "يكون لون رايتهم احمرا، وعليها نجمة وهلال، مشابهة تقريبا للعلم التركي". يؤكد حازم "بعد الاحداث قلت مبيعات العلم العراقي، نحن الان نبيع الاعلام العشائرية بكميات كبيرة واحجام لم نكن نصنع منها قبلا"، بينما يحرص القادة، يستدرك حازم بابتسامة، على شراء رايات وحداتهم، ومن قماش يتحمل المعارك ويكون ظاهرا لدى التصوير في التلفاز. ويتابع، في هذه الاوقات تتجول كاميرات التلفاز الرسمي على مضافات الشيوخ في المناطق الجنوبية، وكلهم يريد تبيان التزامه بفتوى السيستاني، ويحرص على ان تكون رايات عشيرته اكبر من غيرها في التجمعات والاهازيج التي تحتوي على اكثر من عشيرة، مضيفا، حتى العشيرة الواحدة بدات بيوتاتها بانتاج رايات مستقلة، تقوم برفعها في هذه التجمعات. فاروق بابان، وهو محلل سياسي، يفسر هذه الحالة بانها "بيان على ضعف الدولة"، موضحا، ان "شيوخ العشائر يعتاشون على عطايا الدولة، والحكومة الحالية توفر لهم الكثير من الدعم، لهذا فهم حريصون على ابراز ولائهم لها، كما ان للاقتتال المذهبي دورا كبيرا في تغذية النعرات القبلية". ويلفت بابان، الذي يبلغ الستين من العمر، الى خطورة هذا الامر، مؤكدا ان "الوطنية التي كانت الصفة الاسمى لدى جيلنا، اضحت مثارا للسخرية لدى الكثيرين من الشباب حاليا، في حين ازدهرت القيم العشائرية، والانتماءات الدينية اللتين تشظتا الى درجة ان مؤيدي رجل دين من مذهب ما، يقتتلون مع مؤيدي رجل دين اخر من نفس المذهب، ويقتتل ابناء العشيرة الواحدة احيانا، على خلافات بين افخاذها، قد تصل من التفاهة الى موضوع رعي بقرة فرد من العشيرة في مرعى يعود لفرد اخر من العشيرة ذاتها، لكن من فخذ مختلف". لكن المؤرخ صالح الخضيري له رأي اخر، اذ يقول ان "السكان يلجأون في فترات ضعف القانون الى الانتماءات الفرعية، مثل الدين والمذهب والقبيلة، من اجل البقاء ضمن محيط يحميهم، مع انه يفرض عليهم الكثير من القيود". ويتابع الخضيري، وهو عضو اتحاد المؤرخين العرب وعالم بالانساب معتمد من قبل الجامعة العربية ان "التاريخ يشير بوضوح الى ان السكان يميلون الى الانقسام الى كانتونات او مكونات اصغر في فترة تشظي الدولة او ضعفها"، مبينا "بغداد انقسمت ايام غزو المغول الى احياء سنية واخرى شيعية، كانت تقتتل بينها دائما، وللاسف يبدو ان ساسة العراق لايقرأون التاريخ، اللذي يقول ان الخراب ينتظر المجتمعات التي لاتزدهر فيها سلطة القانون، والعدل، والنظام".

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الخياطون، مؤشر لحمام الدم الذي قد يشه...
baghdad
By Reda Kareem
08 Jul 2014

الخياطون، مؤشر لحمام الدم الذي قد يشهده العراق

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The Wedding Dress Tailor of Cairo
Cairo, Egypt
By jmontasir
02 Jun 2014

Madame Zeinab is a feisty, 60 year-old tailor who operates a small workshop in Cairo making wedding dresses. As she pieces together the fabric, she reflects on her own love life –and how the dream of marriage is getting harder for many Egyptians to achieve.

Length 3.10 minutes
Location Cairo, Egypt
Film by Jenny Montasir
Prod. Assistant Ghada Fikri
Music C. Filipe Alves

SHOT LIST:

1 WS Giza street from above
2 MS Fruit sellers working
3 WS Busy street with traffic
4 WS Omraneya commercial street
5 MS Exterior sewing shop
6 MS Madame Zeinab entering workshop
7 CS Madame Zeinab hands moving white fabric on work desk
8 TC Madame Zeinab explains workday
9 CS Madame Zeinab hands draws and measures around dress pattern
10 CS Sewing machine
11 CS Sewing needle and hands moving fabric
12 CS Madame Zeinab eyes
13 MS Religious texts on wall
14 CS Black and white thread spools
15 MS Madame Zeinab stretches at sewing table
16 MS Crowded workroom, ironing board
17 CU Scissors and rhinestone trim
18 WS Madame Zeinab at sewing table with wedding dress
19 CU Madame Zeinab hand-sewing rhinestones to collar
20 MS Madame Zeinab flipping through notebook with sketches, speaking to off-camera customers
21 WS Madame Zeinab speaking with two female customers
22 TC Madame Zeinab jokes about why customers want to have their own wedding dress
23 WS Giza neighborhood from above
24 WS Omraneya street, teenage boy walking with baby
25 CU Photo of married couple in shop window
26 MS Wedding dress in shop window, traffic moving in reflection
27 MS Older man in street counts money at shop entrance
28 CU Exterior wedding tent
29 MS Children inside wedding tent
30 WS Bride and groom climb onto elevated platform
31 WS Seated women clapping
32 MS Young girl twirls bouquet, pan to seated bride
33 CS Twinkling lights strung in tent
34 CS Young man hypes crowd on microphone, other young man dances alongside him
35 MS Young men dancing frenetically in crowd
36 MS Bride and groom dance in a circle of guests
37 WS Giza street evening
38 MS Madame Zeinab discusses wedding dress design with her daughter
39 CS Notebook and ruler on workdesk
40 WS Madame Zeinab arranging white fabric on work desk
41 MS Madame Zeinab hobbles into break room
42 CS Colorful spools of thread
43 MS Madame Zeinab drinking tea
44 WS Daughter watching political rally on TV
45 CU Daughter's looking up toward TV
46 TC Madame Zeinab on hope for future
47 MS Madame Zeinab working on dress, reflected in mirror
48 MS Madame Zeinab at sewing table with white fabric, makes joke about getting married

SHOT LIST - Rough Version
1 WS Giza street from above
2 MS Fruit sellers working
3 WS Busy street with traffic
4 WS Omraneya commercial street
5 MS Exterior sewing shop
6 MS Madame Zeinab entering workshop
7 CS Madame Zeinab hands moving white fabric on work desk
8 CS Madame Zeinab hands draws and measures around dress pattern
9 CS Sewing machine
10 CS Sewing needle and hands moving fabric
11 CS Madame Zeinab eyes
12 MS Religious texts on wall
13 CS Black and white thread spools
14 MS Madame Zeinab stretches at sewing table
15 MS Crowded workroom, ironing board
16 CU Scissors and rhinestone trim
17 WS Madame Zeinab at sewing table with wedding dress
18 CU Madame Zeinab hand-sewing rhinestones to collar
19 MS Madame Zeinab flipping through notebook with sketches, speaking to off-camera customers
20 WS Madame Zeinab speaking with two female customers
21 WS Giza neighborhood from above
22 WS Omraneya street, teenage boy walking with baby
23 CU Photo of married couple in shop window
24 MS Wedding dress in shop window, traffic moving in reflection
25 MS Older man in street counts money at shop entrance
26 CU Exterior wedding tent
27 MS Children inside wedding tent
28 WS Bride and groom climb onto elevated platform
29 WS Seated women clapping
30 MS Young girl twirls bouquet, pan to seated bride
31 CS Twinkling lights strung in tent
32 CS Young man hypes crowd on microphone, other young man dances alongside him
33 MS Young men dancing frenetically in crowd
34 MS Bride and groom dance in a circle of guests
35 WS Giza street evening
36 MS Madame Zeinab discusses wedding dress design with her daughter
37 CS Notebook and ruler on work desk
38 WS Madame Zeinab arranging white fabric on work desk
39 MS Madame Zeinab hobbles into break room
40 CS Colorful spools of thread
41 MS Madame Zeinab drinking tea
42 WS Daughter watching political rally on TV
43 CU Daughter's looking up toward TV
44 MS Madame Zeinab working on dress, reflected in mirror
45 TC Madame Zeinab explains workday
46 TC Madame Zeinab jokes about why customers want to have their own wedding dress
47 TC Madame Zeinab on hope for future
48 MS Madame Zeinab at sewing table with white fabric, makes joke about getting married

SCRIPT
01:00:12:19-01:00:15:13
My name is Madame Zeinab.
01:00:15:22-01:00:18:22
I have a shop called Al-Karawan in Omraneya.
01:00:19:13-01:00:22:14
We can sew anything.
01:00:25:06-01:00:29:11
I'm here by 10am and I don't go home until 12 at night.
01:00:32:03-01:00:35:16
I stand and cut.
I sit at the machine, and I iron.
01:00:35:17-01:00:37:17
I do everything by myself.
01:00:41:01-01:00:43:06
I got a sewing machine for my engagement
01:00:43:07-01:00:45:17
so I could help my husband and work.
01:00:47:08-01:00:49:20
He was a primary school teacher in Al-Azhar.
01:00:51:02-01:00:52:17
I have five children,
01:00:52:18-01:00:55:18
and their father has been dead for 30 years.
01:00:59:22-01:01:02:03
Nowadays most people just rent.
01:01:02:10-01:01:05:22
It's hard for a woman to buy when
she can barely afford to get married.
01:01:05:23-01:01:09:18
She can't afford the furnishings.
So why would she buy a dress for 3000 pounds?
01:01:14:20-01:01:16:19
A lot of people say, 'I want to tailor my own dress
01:01:16:20-01:01:19:04
to have as a memory in my wardrobe.'
01:01:19:05-01:01:22:17
Whenever she sees it
she'll remember her wedding day.
01:01:22:18-01:01:24:14
Whatever marital problems happen afterward,
01:01:24:15-01:01:26:17
when she sees the dress, she'll calm down.
01:01:29:07-01:01:33:10
I got married in a time when
people married at 18 years old.
01:01:35:13-01:01:37:22
Of course marriage was much easier back then.
01:01:37:23-01:01:42:05
Life was cheap and things weren't
as scarce as they are now.
01:01:51:20-01:01:54:21
A woman can't stay unmarried.
01:01:54:22-01:01:56:18
If she doesn't get married,
what will people say?
01:01:56:19-01:01:59:20
It's even better to get married and get divorced.
01:01:59:21-01:02:03:03
Then at least she can say, 'Yes, I got married.
But I have bad luck.'
01:02:24:14-01:02:26:16
I have a daughter who's a teacher,
01:02:26:17-01:02:29:04
and I have Ahmed who has a bachelor in commerce.
01:02:29:05-01:02:32:22
Osama has a diploma, and Mohamed
has a bachelor in commerce, too.
01:02:32:23-01:02:36:19
But because there's no work, one of them is
a taxi driver and the others do whatever.
01:02:39:23-01:02:36:18
[On radio] The Egyptian Revolution of January 25th, 01:02:39:22-01:02:42:09
the greatest achievement of which was...
01:02:43:09-01:02:45:03
Because of the conditions of the country,
01:02:45:04-01:02:47:13
the youth can't find apartments.
There's no place to live.
01:02:47:14-01:02:50:01
This is what's stopping life.
01:02:50:02-01:02:54:15
Our hope is that this changes
so that the country gets better.
01:02:54:16-01:02:56:08
Enough with the destruction.
01:02:59:19-01:03:02:09
I'm 60 years old and I want to get married.
01:03:04:12-01:03:06:18
I want to get married.