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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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Lebanese Lookout
Beiteddine, Lebanon
By Beau Lowenstern
18 Jun 2012

Looking through two windows of an old house in Beiteddine

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Caltagirone, Summer Midday
Sicily
By Trinacria
02 Jun 2012

Caltagirone, Sicily. Early summer midday.

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Mosque in Taftanaz
Taftanaz, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Taftanaz, Syria

Mosque destroyed by shelling in Taftanaz during attacks that occurred while the UN was negotiating for monitors with Assad.

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Destroyed Home
Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Syria

Children run through rubble of a home destroyed by tank shells in Kelly.

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Mourning Mother
Sarmeen, Idlib, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Sarmeen, Syria

A women weeping for her three sons killed by government forces in a raid on Sarmeen.

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Destroyed Home
Sarmeen, Idlib, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Sarmeen, Syria

Looking at the rubble of a local home ransacked by security forces in Sarmeen.

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Execution in Taftanaz
Taftanaz, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Taftanaz, Syria

A man shows a room where nine men were executed in Taftanaz, Syria.

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Mourning Death of Sons
Taftanaz, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Taftanaz, Syria
Mourning the death of their two sons who were members of the FSA and killed by government forces.

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Checkpoint Outside Taftanaz
Taftanaz, Syria
By Rachel Beth Anderson
29 Apr 2012

Taftanaz, Syria

Checkpoint guarded by Free Syrian Army outside Taftanaz.

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Made in Bangladesh
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By U.S. Editor
10 Apr 2012

Bangladesh’s garment industry, responsible for nearly 80% of the country’s exports, employs an estimated two to three million people, 80% of which are women, in over 4,000 factories all over the country. Although violating national law, some suppliers still employ children under the age of 14. Workers, reliant on their wages to support their families, are highly underpaid; most people earn approximately 1,500-2,000 Taka (15 - 20 Euros) per month while working 12 hour days, 6 days a week.

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Demolition Drive In Golibar
Khar East, Mumbai, India
By Javed Iqbal
29 Feb 2012

A resident tries to stall the demolition of his friend's home by calling up a commanding police officer.

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Egyptian Revolution Archive Photos
Suez, Egypt
By mostafaa.sheshtawy
28 Dec 2011

Photos taken in the streets of Cairo during the January 25th revolution.

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Cooling The Heat For The Protesters
Mohammed Mahmoud Street, Cairo, Egypt
By mostafaa.sheshtawy
09 Sep 2011

A resident of the famous Mohammed Mahmoud Street near Tahrir Square was spraying water at the protesters to help cool the heat. A gesture of kindness.

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War Scars in Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
By Mais Istanbuli
06 Jul 2010

On November 21, 1995, the Dayton Agreement ended the civil war in what is now Bosnia and Herzegovina. 18 years later, the promises of the agreement have not been kept. Returning to a state of peace is slow and difficult in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the remnants of the war are evident everywhere.

War refugees live in containers or partially destroyed buildings. In 2012, UNHCR reported that around 112,802 people are still internally displaced.

Meanwhile, the ICMP (International Commission on Missing Persons) still works to identify those who are missing. According to the ICMP, at the end of the conflict in former Yugoslavia, 40,000 people were missing or presumed dead. So far, in Bosnia and Herzegovina, about 10,000 people are still missing.

The younger generation hopes that Bosnia and Herzegovina will join the European Union one day, but for many, peace and resolution still seem unattainable.

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On Fire
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
01 Jan 2009

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Someone little
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
01 Jan 2009

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Landscape Of A Refugee Camp
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
01 Jan 2009

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Silent speak-out
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
31 Dec 2008

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Hopelessly against the Gaza war
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
31 Dec 2008

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Victory sign
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
31 Dec 2008

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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Silent speak-out II
Burj al Barajneh, Beirut, Lebanon
By Dominika Plonska
31 Dec 2008

Palestinians living in Burj al Barajneh, a refugee camp in Beirut, Lebanon, organized a protest against the Israeli military attacks on Gaza during the winter of 2008-2009. The demonstration turned into a hopeless, silent march, with the company of only a few television cameras and their voices were barely heard.

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The People of Pingelap (2 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
03 Apr 2008

A colorblind woman and a disabled boy.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

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The People of Pingelap (1 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
03 Apr 2008

Seagulls flying over the Pingelap Atoll.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

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The People Of Pingelap
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By U.S. Editor
02 Apr 2008

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

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The People of Pingelap (27 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
26 Mar 2008

One of three parts of the 1,5 x 1 sq-km small Pingelap Atoll. Pingelap is located in the pacific ocean and belongs to the Federated States of Micronesia. About 350 km south-east from the main island Pohnpei.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

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The People of Pingelap (17 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
26 Mar 2008

A woman clean her garden and burn waste.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

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The People of Pingelap (5 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
25 Mar 2008

Children playing in the pacific ocean.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.

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The People of Pingelap (13 of 27)
Pingelap, Federated States of Micronesia
By Hannes von der Fecht
25 Mar 2008

Two color-blind men on a boat in the lagoon of Pingelap atoll.

Pingelap is a small island in the Pacific Ocean, a part of the Federate States of Micronesia. About 240 people live on this atoll. Ten per cent of them have a genetic form of colour blindness, achromatopsia, meaning their sight is extremely diffused and their eyes very sensitive to light. This disease is locally known as "Maskun", which in Pingelapese language means "to not see".
In his book, The Island of the Colorblind, Oliver Sacks, author and neurologist, describes the life of the inhabitants of Pingelap. His interest is based on the question, if, because of the multitude of people with Maskun in Pingelap, there is an independent culture of colour blind people. This book inspired me to travel to Pingelap and create a photographic series as a study in the perception of people with Maskun. I discovered that in everyday life people with Maskun are hardly distinguishable from those without – only the constant blinking of the eyes in the bright sunshine reveals any difference. With my camera I wanted to somehow visualise how the island was percieved by its inhabitants and come to terms with those who are living with Maskun.