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Morrocco on two wheels (4 of 25)
Marrakech, Morocco
By Martushka Fromeast
21 Feb 2013

Little Amsterdam. There are lots of traditional dutchies on the streets of Moroccan towns and cities.

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The Rise Of The Anonymous
Tehran, Iran
By U.S. Editor
08 Feb 2013

"Toloo Institute" in Persian means "The Rise Of The Anonymous" is the name of a charity organization. Every week its members salute the homeless people of south Tehran with warm home made meals, chat with them and introduce them to this institution. People who suffer from addiction are treated in the rehabilitation centers with the institute's sponsorship and for the ones that have nowhere to live, they provide shelter. Some of those who take part in these events were once suffering from the same complications however, they have now overcome those hardships with the aid of this institution and are now trying to help in kind.

Some, though not all, of Iran's homeless are addicted to hashish which they smoke in water pipes (nargileh). The homeless are supported by an organization that is also made up of young men and women that cook for them and then distribute the food. They offer advice and counseling to the drug addicts.

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LIVING WITH LEPROSY IN ETHIOPIA - Edi...
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By Editor's Picks
04 Feb 2013

In Ethiopia living with leprosy has enormous social implications. Though it is not contagious, contracting the disease forces most people to a solitary life, or at best, into a leper community such as are found throughout the country. Medicinal and educational advances see understanding of the disease growing in Ethiopia, not least apparent at The Alert hospital, a charitable hospital funded primarily through European aid that provides inexpensive or free treatment to many victims of leprosy.

The Alert hospital is situated in a slum, where a small group of women gather to fight their condition; they've created a small business in which they knit, sew and sell traditional garments and bedding, earning a small salary that contributes to the well being of their families. Life continues to be difficult, but several women are able to provide schooling, food, and a home for their children and ease some of the distress of living with leprosy.

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Sickness born out of poverty
kampong cchnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

Leprosy, or Hansen’s disease, is the sickness of the developing world - sickness born out of poverty. Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease which attacks the skin, the peripheral nerves, the mucous air passages and the eyes. The transmission of leprosy is similar to that of tuberculosis. To date, science has not been able to produce a vaccine against leprosy.

The physical handicap caused by the disease stigmatises its victims: it renders the sufferers social outcasts, excluded from their familial and social environment.

Today there are more than a million cases of leprosy identified worldwide, excluding the large number of ex-patients needing specialised mid-term medical and surgical treatment or social assistance because of the handicap caused by the disease.

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Sickness born out of poverty (7 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

One of the first signs of leprosy are pale patches on the skin. The fingers start to stiffen up and eventually without the proper medication lose the feeling as the nerves slowly die.

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Sickness born out of poverty (6 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

Me and my family are shunned by our local community, my family now by our food from a market nearly 2 miles away.

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Sickness born out of poverty (5 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

Leprosy, or Hansen’s disease, is the sickness of the developing world - sickness born out of poverty. Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease which attacks the skin, the peripheral nerves, the mucous air passages and the eyes. The transmission of leprosy is similar to that of tuberculosis. To date, science has not been able to produce a vaccine against leprosy.

The physical handicap caused by the disease stigmatises its victims: it renders the sufferers social outcasts, excluded from their familial and social environment.

Today there are more than a million cases of leprosy identified worldwide, excluding the large number of ex-patients needing specialised mid-term medical and surgical treatment or social assistance because of the handicap caused by the disease.

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Sickness born out of poverty (4 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

In only seven years I lost all my fingers. If the antibiotics were available to me when i realised that I had contracted leprosy, things may have been different for me now.

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Sickness born out of poverty (3 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

My son and wife have to help me with everything that I do in daily life , my eyes have now lost there sight, I cant even see to wash my self. My community has shunned me, they are scared that they will catch this terrible disease that is slowly eating me away.

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Sickness born out of poverty (2 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

I have now lost the feeling in my feet and constantly injure myself.

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Sickness born out of poverty (1 of 8)
Kampong Chhnang Cambodia
By George Nickels
26 Jan 2013

Life is extremely difficult, my son helps me to dress myself, clean my wounds and now that I have completely lost my sight navigate through my house. CIOML provide me with antibiotics which has helped calm the disease spreading but I feel that it is now too late.

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Israel elections 2013 (4 of 7)
Jerusalem, Israel
By Nili Bassan
22 Jan 2013

Activists of the party "Ozma to Israel" are hanging a poster of their party in the entrance to a polling station in Jerusalem.

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Israel elections 2013 (2 of 7)
Jerusalem, Israel
By Nili Bassan
22 Jan 2013

A poster of Israeli Prime Minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, in Jerusalem.

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The Midnight Protests
Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
By Javed Iqbal
02 Jan 2013

Thousands of urban poor decided to sit-in at Azad Maidan over the last five days until the government gives a positive response to their demands for the right to housing, and for the government to investigate a Slum Rehabilitation scheme that has been displacing the people who it is meant to serve.

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From Top of the Rock
new york
By motasemdhawi
31 Dec 2012

Amazing view for New York city from top of the rock

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Massive Grave
Horsh Beirut, Lebanon
By Roï
17 Nov 2012

Over 17,000 people disappeared during the 1975-90 Lebanese Civil War. To date, the families of the disappeared continue to struggle for their right to know what happened to those who were taken from them, if they are still alive and, if it turns out that they have died, whether they can recover their remains.

PICTURED: A woman holding her husband's photo in the cemetery.

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Demolition at Sion Koliwada
Sion, Mumbai, India
By Javed Iqbal
06 Nov 2012

The original inhabitants of Mumbai, the Kolis, faced another demolition drive for a development project in Sion Koliwada.

As per law, a builder requires 70% of the residents of a registered society to give consent to the project but in Sion Koliwada, the residents have repeatedly asserted that the builder used forged documents to claim a majority for the project.

There are over 80 re-development projects in Mumbai where residents have repeatedly claimed that the builder used fraudulent means to claim consent.

For a deeper understanding, please refer to previously published material available here - http://moonchasing.wordpress.com/2012/06/04/invisible-cities-part-ten-the-demolition-seige-of-sion-koliwada/

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Demolition Drive At Sion Koliwada
Mumbai, India
By Javed Iqbal
05 Nov 2012

The homes of the original inhabitants of Mumbai, the Kolis have been facing demolition drive for high-end development projects.

As per law, a builder requires 70% of the residents of a registered society to give consent to the project but in Sion Koliwada, the residents have repeatedly asserted that the builder used forged documents to claim a majority for the project.

There are over 80 re-development projects in Mumbai where residents have repeatedly claimed that the builder used fraudulent means to claim consent.

For a deeper understanding, please refer to previously published material available here - http://moonchasing.wordpress.com/2012/06/04/invisible-cities-part-ten-the-demolition-seige-of-sion-koliwada/

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Young boy helps to pick rocks to be t...
Cairo, Egypt
By adrehsler
12 Oct 2012

On October 12, 2012 critics of President Mohamed Morsi held a demonstration criticizing his first 100 days while supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood held a rally only feet away from the secular opponents to rally against the courts that acquitted two dozen allies of ex-president Hosni Mubarak. Not long after violent clashes broke out where Molotov cocktails and rocks were thrown. At least 11o people were injured.

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Songs from Karakul Lake
Karakul Lake, Kizilsu Kirgiz Autonomous Prefecture, China
By aruszka
05 Sep 2012

Located in Kizilsu Kirghiz Autonomous Prefecture, Karakul Lake, also known as the "Black lake," is home to this child who lives alone in a necropolis along the shore.

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Editor's Picks 24 August 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
23 Aug 2012

Protest Against Repression of Journalistic Freedom
Dozens of writers, journalists and intellectuals gathered at Talaat Harb Square in central Cairo Thursday evening, August 23, to protest what they consider the "Repression of the press and freedom of expression." The participants chanted slogans indicating their hostile stance toward the Muslim Brotherhood and condemning the imprisonment of journalists as against the basic tenets of freedom of the press.

Trial Of Al Dustour Editor in Chief
Giza Criminal Court adjourned on Thursday, August 23, postponing the trial of the editor-in-chief of Al-Dustour independent newspaper Islam Afifi to September 16. He faces charges of spreading false information and insulting President Mohamed Morsi.

Tension In Tripoli
The port city of Tripoli, the second largest city in Lebanon, remains tense, with armed men driving through the city and shooting rounds of live fire into the air.
Clashes between the rival neighborhoods of the anti-Assad Sunni stronghold of Bab al-Tabbaneh and the Alawite-dominated and pro-Assad Jabal Mohsen erupted on Monday over a personal dispute.

Early Childhood Education In Kenya
A touching photo essay produced in Nairobi, Kenya, showing the difficult and rudimentary conditions of an elementary school and the will of young children to learn and get an education.

Silent victims: Landmine survivors in Cambodia
Cambodia reported 96 landmine casualties in the first five months of 2012, according to a report of the Cambodian Mine and Explosive Remnants of War Victim Information System, and they quoted sadly young children account for about half of all landmine victims

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Editor's Picks 21 August 2012
Middle East
By Editor's Picks
20 Aug 2012

A look at Eid Al Fitr celebrations in Egypt, including the release of 638 prisoners from Egyptian prisons, as directed by presidential decree.

After the death of a 16 year old boy in Bahrain, local people and the boy's loved ones take to the streets in protest of human rights abuses and harsh treatment by Bahraini security forces.

A sample from a black & white photo essay of survivors of land mine detonations in Cambodia; despite a disproportionately large number of the population affected by land lines, many receive prostheses and a chance at life.

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Sidetext
Beirut, Lebanon
By Beau Lowenstern
12 Aug 2012

An old-style building in Ashrafieh, Beirut

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Valley
Qartaba, Lebanon
By Beau Lowenstern
29 Jul 2012

Looking out onto a valley above Qartaba

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REMNANTS OF WAR, LANDMINE SURVIVORS I...
KANDAL CAMBODIA
By George Nickels
20 Jul 2012

REMNANTS OF WAR
A severe problem that Cambodia faces is the magnitude of landmines littered over virtually every provence throughout the country. more than 40% of the villages in Cambodia have a mine problem.
This is the legacy of three decades of savage war leaving 40,000+ amputees through out the country. Recent estimates show that there may be as many as four to six million mines and unexploded devices left undetected in Cambodia although some estimates run as high as ten million.
In the warfare that raged in Cambodia from 1970 until 1998, all sides used land mines.
Most were manufactured in China, Russia, or Vietnam and the United States. Pol Pot, whose regime was responsible for the deaths of some 1.7 million Cambodians between 1975 and 1979, purportedly called land mines his “perfect soldiers.”

Major minefields have been mapped and are being systematically demined. Although estimates show that it may take between 10 and 20 years to eradicate the threat and with serious amounts of money involved to do so.

Cambodia reported 96 landmine casualties in the first five months of 2012, according to a report of the Cambodian Mine and Explosive Remnants of War Victim Information System, and they quoted sadly young children account for about half of all landmine victims

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REMNANTS OF WAR, LANDMINE SURVIVORS I...
KANDAL CAMBODIA
By George Nickels
20 Jul 2012

A severe problem that Cambodia faces is the magnitude of landmines littered over virtually every provence throughout the country. more than 40% of the villages in Cambodia have a mine problem.
This is the legacy of three decades of savage war leaving 40,000+ amputees through out the country. Recent estimates show that there may be as many as four to six million mines and unexploded devices left undetected in Cambodia although some estimates run as high as ten million.
In the warfare that raged in Cambodia from 1970 until 1998, all sides used land mines.
Most were manufactured in China, Russia, or Vietnam and the United States. Pol Pot, whose regime was responsible for the deaths of some 1.7 million Cambodians between 1975 and 1979, purportedly called land mines his “perfect soldiers.”

Major minefields have been mapped and are being systematically demined. Although estimates show that it may take between 10 and 20 years to eradicate the threat and with serious amounts of money involved to do so.

Cambodia reported 96 landmine casualties in the first five months of 2012, according to a report of the Cambodian Mine and Explosive Remnants of War Victim Information System, and they quoted sadly young children account for about half of all landmine victims

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Lights of Lebanon
Beirut, Lebanon
By Beau Lowenstern
05 Jul 2012

Lebanon's breathtaking natural beauty has been hidden for years behind a mask war and volatility. Its colour and light have been reduced to a monochrome image of violence and bloodshed. By attempting to bring back a balance through use black and white, light and shadow and its brilliant natural colour, Lebanon shines through to people from all corners of the globe. With an incredible variety of land and cityscapes that offer completely unique adventures and getaways, Lebanon delivers an unforgettable travelling experience.

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Black & White Sunrise
Beirut, Lebanon
By Beau Lowenstern
05 Jul 2012

Sunrise over Bierut, taken from the top of a house in Hazmieh

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.

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EVICTION AND DESTRUCTION
Siem Reap Cambodia
By George Nickels
02 Jul 2012

A lively and cultural community in Siem Reap has come to an abrupt and sad end. Nearly 400 Cambodian and Vietnamese families have been evicted from their homes beside the Siem Reap river in the Slokram commune of the city. The decision has been made by officials - with the reasons stated as needing to develop, widen the river and make new communal gardens.

The Vietnamese and Cambodians I spoke to told me how after notification by letter to take down their fragile wooden shacks on stilts, and find a new home elsewhere.

A considerable police force arrived in the early hours, and demanded that all families and businesses had one day to leave, or their homes would be destroyed.

Because some of these river residents have been living and working in the area for over 15 years, I was told that the government have offered the Cambodian residents a small piece of land at Sala Kamroeuk commune, 6 kilometers outside the city on a flood plain. They will also receive a small payment of a few hundred dollars.
I have recently spoken to some of the evicted families and still they have received no compensation, so even if they did decide to move to proposed flood prone area they would not have enough money to build simple shelters.

However, the Vietnamese have been given a small amount of compensation, but have no land rights, up to 10 families with countless children are all now homeless.

That morning, an emergency meeting was called so that the residents could protest to the district governor about the situation; I attended on the invite of a Vietnamese family, and on our return to the commune, some families found that their properties had been taken down in their absence.