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Libya's Lost Generation 7
By Melanie Wenger
28 Feb 2014

Sifaw plays Amazigh music in gatherings to promote his culture in the different cities of eastern Libya as part of his peaceful work for the Amazigh cause. His culture, he insists, is quite different from the Arab culture. During the revolution, Sifaw used to fight against Gadhafi with his fellows from Yefren, and now carries a Kalachinkov with him to protect his family from the rising insecurity, home invasions and car hijacking in Libya.

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Libya's Lost Generation 5
By Melanie Wenger
21 Feb 2014

Songwriter, guitarist and death metal fan Ousman Ben Khalifa prefers to play only Amazigh songs in his few concerts in Libya. « Sharia people, they think metal music is a Satanic music against religion. Honestly, I do not know how things will end if I try to play [death metal] so I just avoid playing it in public places. It's not safe to play metal music in Libya." Ousama is hoping to leave Libya and is now filing for a Canadian visa so he can study and hopefully find a job there.

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Libya's Lost Generation 9
By Melanie Wenger
20 Feb 2014

On February 20th, the day of the Constitution assembly elections, the Imazighen declared their autonomy and gathered in their main city, Zwara. At the end of a men-only demonstration, young women were allowed to join and light some candles. They were complaining that their people were not included in the elections and want the central government and parliament to guarantee their language and culture in Libya's planned constitution.

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Libya's Lost Generation 8
By Transterra Editor
20 Feb 2014

On February 20, 2014 - Amazigh people protest and demand their rights at the Congress during a demonstration organized by the Libyan Amazigh Supreme Council in Zwara. The Amazigh minority, or Berbers, who were oppressed by former Libyan leader Muammar Gadhafi, want the paralyzed government and parliament to guarantee their language and cutlure in Libya's planned constitution. "It's not a fair fight," says Fathi Youssef, one of the Libyan Amazigh Supreme Council's leaders. "Power, politics are deeply linked to weapons in Libya. We chose the peaceful way. I think this is our mistake. We already lost the game," he adds.

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Libya's Lost Generation 4
By Melanie Wenger
16 Feb 2014

Before the revolution, Younis was a touristic guide. Tourists from Europe stopped coming to Libya when the revolution started, so Younis tries to make a living by guiding the few English-speaking journalists who visit Libya occasionally for reports. Since he gave up fighting, he sometimes meets with his old fellow fighters to have fun and "shoot a little" in Farwa Islands near Zwara, an isolated and deserted place where they can "blow off the steam and not lose it."

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Libya's Lost Generation 1
By Melanie Wenger
15 Feb 2014

Mariam (20), Mahdea (26) and Ajaeeb (35) are sisters who were injured in the bombing of their house in Majer. They just came back from three years of treatment and surgeries in Germany. There are no facilities adapted to handicapped people in their little village, one hour away by car from Misrata. Trapped in their own homes now, they don't see any future for themselves, considering it unlikely for them to find a job, have a husband and raise a family.

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Libya's Lost Generation 12
By Melanie Wenger
15 Feb 2014

Najim Al-Morabit, 14, is coming back for the first time in his old home in Zliten, where he lost his mother and two brothers. Traumatized by the bombing, he sees a psychiatrist every week in Misrata without the knowledge of his family as he doesn't want to be considered crazy.

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Libya's Lost Generation 13
By Melanie Wenger
14 Feb 2014

A few women demonstrate in a female-only area during a protest against the extension of the Congress' mandate in Benghazi's Liberty Square.

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Libya's Lost Generation 14
By Melanie Wenger
10 Feb 2014

The children from the Al-Gharari family have witnessed their uncles and aunts die when the family house was struck by the NATO. Their father is still fighting the NATO and the Libyan government in court for compensation for the loss of their family house where three generations had been living together. The children say that their grandparents "died of sorrow" three months ago.

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Libya's Lost Generation 6
By Melanie Wenger
05 Oct 2012

Young guys hanging out in an abandoned part of a military academy in Janzur, Tripoli. Many young people come to this deserted area to hang out, fix old cars and practise car drifting. To make a living, they get involved in all sorts of trafficking such as goods for the Tawarghan camp, drugs, stolen cars, etc. Since the Libyan army is still getting put together, some parts of the Academy remain unoccupied.

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Libya's Lost Generation 2
By Melanie Wenger
05 Oct 2012

Amia, 15, stays inside her refugee camp in Janzur, Tripoli instead of going back to school where she fears that she will be bullied again. She was forced to flee her home in Tawergha as the Misrata militias attacked her home town, accusing its population of being pro-Gadhafi in the final days of the revolution. Many young girls have been attacked, burned and tortured by Misrata militias.

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Libya's Lost Generation 10
By Melanie Wenger
02 Oct 2012

Hassan, who is a member of the Al-Jazeera militia based in Ajdabiya, sits in the main office of the katiba (batallion) on chairs found in one of Gadhafi's houses. With his fellow fighters, he used to protect the oil fields in the desert from Gaddafi's troops and other thieves during the revolution.
They have been fighting in the South and gaining control over the oil fields' areas ever since. It is not clear, however, whether they are protecting the oil from thieves or exporting it illegally from the refineries on the coast they control from Ajdabiya to Ras Lanuf.

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Libya's Lost Generation 11
By Melanie Wenger
28 Sep 2012

A young boy visits a little museum shows the pictures of 30 people wounded and killed by a NATO strike in Majer where he used to live. The family is still fighting in court to obtain compensation that would help them build a new home.

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Wasted young Libya 11
By Melanie Wenger
24 Sep 2012

As insecurity blights Tripoli, Corinthia Hotel - like other hotels in the city - employs a katiba (batallion) of a militia to be in charge of security. Militias (affiliated with Libya Dawn), whose work at hotels grants them access to important business places for gun and drug trafficking, are considered the only reliable armed groups since the army consists of young, underpaid soldiers. "When there is trouble, they don't get involved. Their pay is not worth their lives," explains a member of one of the militias. The government provides any militia member with around $700, which is about $300 more than the average salary in Libya.