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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Huge plumes of smoke reach to the sky as followers of Tian Du Yuanshuai set off a mass of firecrackers under a figurine of the deity. The devotees then beat on a drum and march forth.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Devotees of Tian Du Yuanshuai, faces blackened by ash. They have been carrying an effigy of Marshal Tian Du through the streets, occasionally setting off huge numbers of firecrackers under the effigy and standing right next to the explosion as it rocks the area and covers them in ash.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

The cavalcade for Tian Du Yuanshuai. A temple-goer wheels sacred weavings down the road.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

The cavalcade for Tian Du Yuanshuai. A temple-goers wheels sacred items down the road. Behind him the powerful symbol of the tiger.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Smoke fills the air in a busy road in Kaohsiung as the cavalcade for Tiandou Yuanshuai marches forth, intermittently setting of these huge gunpowder explosions.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Exhuausted from the day's exertions, a Tiandou Yuanshuai follower takes a rest on the blackened effigy of Marshal Tian Du, which they have been parading down the road and setting off masses of firecrackers under.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Devotees of Tian Du Yuanshuai, faces blackened by ash. They have been carrying an effigy of Marshal Tian Du through the streets, occasionally setting off huge numbers of firecrackers under the effigy and standing right next to the explosion as it rocks the area and covers them in ash.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Devotees of Tian Du Yuanshuai, faces blackened by ash. They have been carrying an effigy of Marshal Tian Du through the streets, occasionally setting off huge numbers of firecrackers under the effigy and standing right next to the explosion as it rocks the area and covers them in ash.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Celebration of Tian Du Yuanshuai's birthday. The remnants of used firecrackers are kicked aside to prepare for more explosive celebrations.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

The cavalcade for Tiandou Yuanshuai. Taoist devotees take a break from wheeling a golden gong down the road.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Figure of Tian Du Yuanshuai bearing his name "田都元帥" around his neck.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Players of the traditional Chinese instrument the suona, which often accompanies deity's birthday celebrations.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

The sign bears the name of the Taiwanese Taoist temple that this group represents. The air is filled with the smoke of huge firecracker explosions.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Experienced player of the traditional Chinese instrument the suona, which often accompanies deity's birthday celebrations.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Celebration of Tian Du Yuanshuai's birthday. Three temple brothers with traditional tiger face paint.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Devotees of Tian Du Yuanshuai, faces blackened by ash. They have been carrying an effigy of Marshal Tian Du through the streets, occasionally setting off huge numbers of firecrackers under the effigy and standing right next to the explosion as it rocks the area and covers them in ash.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Tian Du Yuanshuai is paraded down the road in Kaohsiung

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Close up of the face of a figure representing Tian Du Yuanshuai, the deity of regional Chinese and Taiwanese opera. The legend says he was saved as an infant by crabs, who fed him on their saliva; hence, he has a crab symbol on his forehead. His followers and many members of opera troupes will not eat crab out of respect for the saviours of their sacred Marshal Tian Du.

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Tin Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Devotee of Tiandou Yuanshuai, face blackened by ash and marked by searing firecrackers. Behind him the effigy of Marshal Tian Du which they have been parading down the road and setting off masses of firecrackers under.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Figure of Tiandou Yuanshuai and temple-goer with traditional suona instrument under his arm.

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Tian Du Yuanshuai
By Benedict Young
15 Jun 2014

Devotees of Tian Du Yuanshuai, faces blackened by ash. They have been carrying an effigy of Marshal Tian Du through the streets, occasionally setting off huge numbers of firecrackers under the effigy and standing right next to the explosion as it rocks the area and covers them in ash.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
By Benedict Young
21 Mar 2014

Freedom of expression should be a basic human right. Pictured is a Taiwanese-language punk band, right after they performed at an spontaneous outdoor protest in Taiwan’s second most populous city Kaohsiung 3 days after the occupation of the Legislative Yuan. For now, musicians, writers and artists in Taiwan can express themselves freely, but many fear for their right to free speech without censorship should Beijing exert dominance on them.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

"No Cross-Strait Service Agreement" The demonstrators oppose the Cross-Strait Service Trade Agreement and are demanding the treaty be withdrawn and reconsidered. They are also advocating setting up a legal framework that would make close scrutiny of all future cross-Strait negotiations obligatory.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

“Selling Your Country For Personal Gain” President Ma is accused of taking a short-termist approach that benefits only him and various mega-rich cronies at expense of the integrity of the nation and the freedom of the people. The last Chinese character also contains a joke about deer antlers. Ma Ying-Jeou recently became a laughing stock for apparently suggesting that antlers are the hair that grows out from a deer’s ears.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

"(Even if you) 1. Blacken our names in the media. 2. Threaten us with gangsters. 3. Block our communication. 4. Cut off our electricity — We will let the whole world know you suck" The sign highlights the ruling KMT's attempts to label the student protestors as an irresponsible mob and the Kuomintang's previous infamy for using hired things against the people. He vows that even if they tried to silence the protestors by cutting communications they will let the whole world know what they are up to.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

The vast majority of those voicing the initial dissent over the government's handling of the Cross Strait Service Trade Agreement were young, educated and very peaceful people.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

“Against the Under the Table Agreement” – “Protect Taiwan”. Many are worried that Taiwan's national security will come under threat if their economy becomes flooded with communist government backed Chinese investment.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

"Save Democracy" - "God Bless Taiwan" Democracy was hard won in Taiwan; protestors fear being slowly absorbed into China and their democratic rights being stripped away.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

“Courses can be flunked, but democracy must not die” Student protestors answer calls from KMT officials for the students occupying the Legislative Yuan to 'go back home and get on with their studies'. Their point is that they are fighting for something far more important for their lives and futures than even their education; they are fighting for their democracy and freedom of speech.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

“I’m a Taiwanese person, I’m against the under-the-table deal” Previously, many people in Taiwan considered themselves both Taiwanese and Chinese (though, not communist Chinese). Now, the majority of people, especially the young, identify themselves as only Taiwanese.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

"If We Don't Rise Up Today, We Won't Be Able To Rise Up Tomorrow" This young protestor echoes the fears of many in his country. The Kuomintang may have brutalised Taiwan's people during the period of martial law 1949-1987, but they are now the elected government of a democratic country - a fact which some jibe President Ma has forgotten - life in Taiwan now in general is very peaceful, people have the freedom to speak out about politics and can express themselves. It is the prospect of a future under the jurisdiction of the Chinese communists that really frightens people here. At this point in time, peaceful protests such as the Sunflower Movement are tolerated in Taiwan; the President has to face public chastisement for ordering riot police to thuggishly remove young protesters from sit-in demonstrations; and eventually, his party will also have to seek re-election. No such recourse exists within China's regime however, and with the horrors of the Tiananmen Square crackdown still fresh in peoples minds, many demonstrators fear this could be their last chance to stand up for their freedom.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

This young man in Kaohsiung's sign reads “Down With The Black Box Deal”, black box meaning an under-the-table or backroom agreement. President Ma was criticised for ramming through the CSSTA Taiwan-China trade bill without bipartisan discussion; hence, it has been labelled a secretive and suspect agreement.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

“F**k the Under the Table Agreement" Young protestors in Taiwan are angry at President Ma's handling of the controversial Cross Strait Service Trade Agreement.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

Sunflower Movement protestors have occupied the Legislative Yuan for over two weeks now. Others, mainly students and some older citizens have joined in, camping out in areas surrounding the parliament. This young protestor urges stamina. Don't sleep, don't stop the civil disobedience until we get justice.

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Taiwan Sunflower Protestors
Kaohsiung
By Benedict Young
20 Mar 2014

This young protestor with striking colourful contact lenses is vows to let the world know what the sunflower movement means.