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Kurdish Women Help Liberate Village f...
Al Hassakah
By TTM Contributor 33
03 Mar 2015

Telbrak, Rojava, Syria

This video depicts the March 3 liberation of the village of Telbrak, a part of Hasakah province in northeastern Syria, 45km south of Qamishli, a strategic point in the war between ISIS and Kurdish forces. The latter included the Women's Protection Units, People's Protection Units, the al-Sanadeed forces, who are descendants of the tribes of Al-Shummar, and the al-Mondaweya tribe, which fights under the umbrella of the Kurdish forces. The international coalition also took part.

Telbrak and its rural areas had been under the control of al-Nusra, an al-Qaeda affiliate. According to the contributor of this video, Syrian regime forces declared they had in fact liberated the area and were occupying the village. However, the heavy presence of Kurdish forces and Kurdish delegations proves the contrary, according to the contributor.

Video description:

Shots of the destruction caused by fighting between Kurdish forces and ISIS; ISIS writings and mottos; shots of the city streets; shots of the Kurdish forces in the city, in addition to Kurdish military vehicles and flags.

(02:03-03:42) An interview with Doctor Nasser Haj Mansour, the responsible of Kurdish forces affairs: (Man, Arabic)
This visit is for many reasons, one of the most important reasons is to visit the People's Protection Units and al-Sanadeed forces, to encourage them after their successful operation in Telhamis, and liberating Telbrak, and to check on people around here. And to deny what have been said about violations and killings in the area, the committee includes officials from the self-directory, most of them are in the level of ministers and committee officials, we are here and we did not see any violations, not in the villages nor in the center of Telbrak.
Interviewer: What is the total area that you have liberated?
I cannot determine a certain number of the size of the liberated area, but i can tell you that from the line of Telbrak, until Jazaa, and the Iraqi-Iranian borders is free of ISIS members. Now the battles are in the south of Telbrak and Telhamis going towards the southern rural side of this area.

(03:42-04:51) Interview with Akram Mahshoush, leader of Kurdish delegation: (Man, Arabic) The operation taken by the People's Protection Units YPG, Women's Protection Units (YPJ) , and al-Sanadeed forces to clean the area of Tebrak located between al-Hasakah and Qamishli from ISIS members who killed people and destroyed areas, confiscated people's farms, and forced them to pay Zaka.
We came to see what happened, and to say to the people who are claiming that People's Protection Units have come to invade the area, we tell them, we did not come to invade the area. People's Protection Units worked on liberating the area because it is a part of Syria and we are all Syrians, and what we want is for life to return to this area.

(05:28-05:57) Interview with Hussein al-Khattab, an Arab member of Kurdish forces: (Man, Arabic)
We came here to retrieve Telhamis, we went through many villages and reached Telbrak, we liberated the areas and thank God none of our men died.

(08:05-09:03) Interview with a female Kurdish field leader, Narkaz Botan, (Woman, Kurdish)
“We began the liberation operation of Telhamis and Telbrak, and we liberated the two towns and many villages and compounds. We have strong willpower, and our fighters were persistent in finishing off ISIS and kicking them out of the area. So the people of our area – Arabs, Kurds, Syriacs and Assyrians – can live peacefully. Our raid was huge and successful. We killed many ISIS members and the area in general has come under our control. The raid will continue until we clean the entire Jazira area of them."

(09:0-10:15) Interview with a Kurdish female fighter, Jinda Kamishlo: (Woman, Kurdish)
“We are very happy to have liberated Telbrak and Telhamis from the cruelty of ISIS, who were raping and lashing women. The liberation process was successful. We are now in March; Women's Day is approaching and this holiday, the women of the two towns will be free, safe and away from ISIS. We will celebrate Women's Day in Telbrak, the single biggest blow against ISIS ideology, which considers women to be objects that are bought and sold. People in this area and in Kurdistan and Rojava are happy with this victory. And we ask God to give us more power to be able to eliminate ISIS from Rojava and Syria. We are happy, and I do not know how to describe it. Victory is ours and is dedicated to our people, and our great leader Ocalan, who is considered the leader of the revolution of Kurdish women and led us to this level, thanks to his ideology and instructions.”

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Kurdish Gunsmith Fights ISIS with Rep...
Erbil
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
03 Mar 2015

The Kurds’ war against the so-called Islamic State may be grabbing headlines for the battles on the frontline, but far from the fighting the conflict has been good business for 36-year-old Kurdish Erbil gunsmith Bakhtiar Sadr ad-Din Aziz.

Aziz specializes in repairs and custom guns for the Kurds, and Peshmerga are lining up to pick up one of his custom creations, or just to get fixes done on one of their aging AK-47s, M16s or DShK heavy machine guns.

Bakhtiar’s shop is located in the Iraqi Kurdish capital Erbil’s central bazar, and Bakhtiar said it is a family business that was owned by his father, who was once imprisoned by the Saddam Hussein regime for supporting the Peshmerga.

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Tal Hamis
By AmmarParis
03 Mar 2015

A Kurdish flag is seen over an ISIS or Daesh sign at the entrance of villages of Tal Hamis and Tal Brak, held by Daesh, are today liberated by YPG Kurdish fighters, as seen on March 1st, 2015. Photo by Transterra Media,

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Tal Hamis
By AmmarParis
03 Mar 2015

Kurdish fighter seen in the villages of Tal Hamis and Tal Brak, held by Daesh, are today liberated by YPG Kurdish fighters, as seen on March 1st, 2015. Photo by Transterra Media,

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Tal Hamis
By AmmarParis
03 Mar 2015

Kurdish fighters seen in the villages of Tal Hamis and Tal Brak, held by Daesh, are today liberated by YPG Kurdish fighters, as seen on March 1st, 2015. Photo by Transterra Media,

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Tal Hamis
By AmmarParis
03 Mar 2015

Kurdish fighter seen in the villages of Tal Hamis and Tal Brak, held by Daesh, are today liberated by YPG Kurdish fighters, as seen on March 1st, 2015. Photo by Transterra Media,

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Tal Hamis
By AmmarParis
03 Mar 2015

Kurdish villages of Tal Hamis and Tal Brak, held by Daesh, are today liberated by YPG Kurdish fighters, as seen on March 1st, 2015. Photo by Transterra Media,

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Destruction and Relief Accompany Libe...
Tal Hamis
By TTM Contributor 33
02 Mar 2015

Kurdish and Arab commanders explain the significance of the liberation of the village of Tal Hamis in the broader struggle against ISIS in northeastern Syria. Suleiman al-Shemri, military leader of the Al-Sanadeed forces - themselves the descendants of the Al-Shummar tribe from which various ISIS fighters have been recruited - describes how the three-day battle to liberate the village was in response to pleas from the village's diverse population hailing from various tribal backgrounds. The film also depicts widespread scenes of destruction in a village that, while verdant, has been given over to abandon.

Shot List:

Shots of the destruction caused by the 3-day battle
Shots of some ISIS symbols and pronouncements
Shots of the city streets and road signs
Shots of the Kurdish forces in the city with the vehicles and flags of the Kurdish forces on a strategic hill in the city

Transcription:
(02:22-04:26) Akid Derek, field commander in the YPG:
(Man, Kurdish)

Telhamis was a center for the Syrian regime but they relinquished it about two years ago and it fell under the control of those terrorists. Our raid started from more than one angle. We began in the town of Jazaa, which is located on the border of Kurdish Iraq, and from the village of Palestine, until we reached here. People's Protection Units and Women's Protection Units along with several supporting Arab forces were able to liberate areas in order to reach Tel Hamis. Coalition air forces were available but not with the required intensity. The liberated area is very big and even reaches the town of Telbrak.

Civilians gradually began returning to their homes and are now free after having suffered under the control of ISIS. We talked to the inhabitants of the liberated villages who confirmed that members of ISIS had seized their property and belongings and evicted them from their homes and villages. At this moment we are going to continue with our raid until we clean the area of members of ISIS, who are now about 30km from Tel Hamis in the area of al-Hol.

ISIS placed mines in parts in the village and in cars too. Some of them are still underground and our specialists are working on deactivating them. We have imprisoned many members of ISIS in this raid, and our forces killed dozens of them. We have 30 ISIS corpses.

(06:30-10:00) Suleiman al-Shemri, military leader of the Al-Sanadeed forces
(Man, Arabic)

Interviewer: tell us about the raid, who participated in it? And how long did it take to liberate Tel Hamis?

Suleiman: The raid began on 21 February 2015 and lasted three days. With the help of God we were able to accomplish our goal. We started this raid as an answer to the request of the population to fight those people who are not related to Islam, based on the request of the inhabitants of Tel Hamis, the people who are the tribes of Sharabeya, Shummar, and Tay. It was based upon their request that we came to Tel Hamis, a center for ISIS.

Interviewer: Why is Tel Hamis significant?

Suleiman: It is an area that connects Iraq and Syria, a strategic location for ISIS.

Interviewer: you, the Al-Sanadeed forces, participated with the YPG in the raid. Who else participated?

Suleiman: The participants in the raid were the YPG (People's Protection Units), the Women's Protection Units and the Al-Sanadeed forces. The Al-Sanadeed made up about 1200-1300 fighters in this raid, but the inhabitants also helped us, while the coalition air forces played a significant role. Almost 200 members of ISIS were killed, and we imprisoned others, but do not know the number of captives. The Peshmerga also helped us from the border.

Interviewer: How many villages were liberated? How big is the liberated area?

Suleiman: We liberated almost 150 villages in the first few days and up until now have done so in about 200 villages.

Interviewer: How far is ISIS now?

Suleiman: They are in al-Hol now. Yesterday the fighters liberated Telbrak, and now we are heading to al-Hol, and then hopefully on to Iraq. People are asking for our help and we are always ready to help people – to fight the enemies of Islam.

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Tal Hamis
By AmmarParis
01 Mar 2015

Kurdish villages of Tal Hamis and Tal Brak, held by Daesh, are today liberated by YPG Kurdish fighters, as seen on March 1st, 2015. Photo by Transterra Media,

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Tal Hamis
By AmmarParis
01 Mar 2015

Kurdish villages of Tal Hamis and Tal Brak, held by Daesh, are today liberated by YPG Kurdish fighters, as seen on March 1st, 2015. Photo by Transterra Media,

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Tal Hamis
By AmmarParis
01 Mar 2015

Kurdish villages of Tal Hamis and Tal Brak, held by Daesh, are today liberated by YPG Kurdish fighters, as seen on March 1st, 2015. Photo by Transterra Media,

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ISIS Show Off in Derna
Derna
By TTM Mena Desk
28 Feb 2015

February 2015
Derna, Libya

Video shot by an eyewitness at the end of February 2015 showing ISIS militants parading through the streets of the northeastern Libyan city of Derna.

The fighters drive in convoys sounding their horns and showing off their guns and flags on a public highway in central Derna as they pass by civilian cars.

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Kurdish, Arab Forces Retake Strategic...
Tal Hamis
By Bedir
28 Feb 2015

Tal Hamis, Syria
February 28, 2015

On 27 February Kurdish and Arab militias recaptured Tal Hamis from ISIS, a town located in the Hasaka province of Syria and some 35km south of Qamishli, a major regional city on the Turkish border that has been hotly contested by ISIS and Kurdish forces in recent months.

Fighters involved belong to various Kurdish militias: the People’s Protection Units (YPG); the Women’s Protection Units (YPJ); and the Shengal Resistance Units, in addition to Arab forces known as Jaish al-Sanadid (The Army of the Brave) which are affiliated with the influential Shummar tribal confederation.

Shummar tribes, for their part, inhabit areas that stretch across Syria, Iraq, Jordan and Saudi Arabia. An influential ISIS commander in Raqqa originally from Saudi Arabia, known as Abu Abdullah Daigham, is from one of the Shummar clans.

According to field commanders interviewed in Tal Hamis, ISIS fighters fled strikes on the ground and airstrikes carried out by the international coalition on Tal Hamis before heading to desert areas in the south of Hasaka province. Commanders also said their forces were preparing to take control of the road between Raqqa province in Syria and Mosul province in Mosul, both of which are major ISIS strongholds. Military commanders said that ISIS fighters had been using Tal Hamis to launch artillery and car bomb attacks against neighboring areas.

Tal Hamis had been under ISIS control for a year and a half and most of its civilians, ethnic Arabs, Kurds, Syriacs and Assyrians, have fled to Qamishli.

SHOTLIST

Wide of road; road sign reads “Tal Hamis”
Wide of male and female fighters entering Tal Hamis
Various of lettering on walls in Kurdish and Arabic apparently left by Kurdish ISIS fighters
Wide of lettering on the wall “There is no God but Allah. The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant”  
Various of lettering on walls in Kurdish and Arabic apparently left by Kurdish ISIS fighters
Moving shot of room interior – ISIS flag on the wall
Moving shot of combat fatigues scattered on the floor
Close-up of what appears to be a logbook left by Kurdish ISIS fighters
Lettering on the wall in Kurdish; lettering in English reads “Be careful of our sniper Abu Dujana Al-Kindy 143/4/2014”
Interview with Assi Dahham, commander of Jaish al-Sanadid commander (SOUNDBITE)
Various of two fighters inspecting destroyed tank
Wide of YPG convoy
Interview with Idris Qamishlo (nom de guerre), YPG Commander (SOUNDBITE)
Interview with Sarhad Hemo (now de guerre), YPG fighter (SOUNDBITE)
Traveling of grain silos
Wide of Kurdish fighters inspecting ammunition(SOUNDBITE)
Various of fighters near destroyed buildings
Wide/ R-L traveling of buildings and YPG flags
R-L traveling of town

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Syrian Assyrians Flee ISIS to Qamishli
Al-Qamishli
By TTM Contributor 33
25 Feb 2015

Qamishli, Syria
February 26, 2015

Christian-Assyrian refugees seek refuge in the Kurdish controlled city of Qamishli after fleeing ISIS advances on their villages of Tal Tamer, Tal Harmoza, Tal al-Jazeera, Tal Kouran and Abu Tina in the Hasakeh province. ISIS militants recently kidnapped 220 Assyrians in Hasakeh province setting a dangerous precedent for christians in the area and spurring entire villages to abandon their homes and flee ISIS advances.

SHOTLIST AND SOUNDBITES

Wide/ external of the Syriac Cultural Association in Syria
Wide of men holding diaper packs destined for displaced families
Wide of diaper packs and other supplies
Wide of supplies in pickup trucks
SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Michael Kourieh, Member of the Syriac Cross
00:23 – 01:30
The Syriac Cross for Relief and Development. Our work currently revolves on to help our Assyrian brothers who fled the Khabour and Tal Tamer areas. They are living in several Assyrian churches. Our aim is to help the Assyrian so that they would feel at home. As you see from these supplies, we work all day long so they would not feel like strangers.
More importantly, from the information that we gathered, we learned that the displaced came from the Khabour area in the hundreds.
We feel sad about that, but we are trying our best to help them and offer them aid.
Various associations in Qamishli are involved in this work, such as the United Nations and Mother Syria Association. Everyone is making an effort [UNINTELLIGIBLE]. We are all coordinating our work and we hope that everyone is pleased with our work. God willing, we shall remain a unified people. “

Wide of Syriac Cross members unloading aid supplies
Wide/ external Syriac Cultural Association in Syria
Wide of aid supplies

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Elizabeth Jouqa, A displaced from Tal Tamer area

01:50 – 03:30

We fled the moment we first heard that ISIS kidnapped women, young men and children. We ran away before ISIS arrived to avoid being captured.
Interviewer: Did many people flee?
Many! There is about 600 [displaced] families here in Qamishli. May God safeguard you.
My relatives were abducted. We do not where they are. Amy God protect them from [ISIS]. May God break their arms.
Interviewer: When did the attack take place?
It was in the morning. We heard about in the morning. We called our relatives In Tal Shmeiran who told us that [ISIS] invaded their village. They said that [ISIS] had taken the men two days earlier to an unknown location and that they were like sheep to the church and did not know what was going to happen to them.
Our men, fighters from the Sotoro organisation and the Kurds, may God protect them, defended the people, but what could they do? The others [ISIS] are many. There were probably 600 of them.
Interviewer: who do you demand help from? The international community? The autonomous administration here? Regional countries?

What can I say?
Interviewer: Do you want aid form the United Nations? Who do you want aid from?

We are grateful for anyone who wants to help us. I do not know who should help us.
Wide of Syriac Cross members unloading aid supplies
Wide of street
Traveling of street

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Julia Butros, A displaced from Tal Tawil village
03:49 – 05:27
It was in at five in the evening. They [the rescuers] took children and their father. It was at five o’clock. People fled using a mobile diesel tank. They removed the tank from the vehicle and put people in its place and took to Hasaka, and from Hasaka they were brought here to Qamishli. People arrived here at midnight. The trip started at five and took all night long.
We do not anyone who was kidnapped. It is said that people were kidnapped in other villages. We cannot say anything other than that we have seen did not see.
Interviewer: Did ISIS blow churches?
They did in another village but not in Tal Tawil. They blew up churches in another village. . In other villages there people whose whereabouts are not known.
Interviewer: How many people fled to Hasaka and Qamishli?

I do not know. May be around 300 or 400 people. Around 100 people fled from our village, Tal Tawil.

Interviewer: who do you demand help from? The international community? The United Nations?
May God reward them, whether they offered aid or not. May God reward you and anyone who helps these troubled people.
Interviewer: Is ISIS present in your village?
[ISIS] is present in other villages. This man’s wife does know anything about her family. Interviewer: Did the Kurdish fighters and the Syriac Council liberate these villages?
They are trying to help, I am not saying that they are not, but what can they do?

Wide of Syriac Cross members unloading aid supplies
Various of Christian icons hung on a wall
Close-up of sign hung on an aid vehicle reads: “An initiative of love and solidarity towards from Tal Tamer and Khabour.”

Close-up of sign on aid vehicle “Syriac Cross Organization for Relief & Development”
Medium of sign on aid vehicle “Syriac Cross Organization for Relief & Development”

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Kurdish Forces Take Back ISIS-held Vi...
Tal Hamis
By TTM Contributor 33
24 Feb 2015

Tal Hamis, Syria

February 24, 2015

The YPG began a military operation on 21 February 2015 to retake a village 42km southeast of Qamishli called Tal Hamis and which had been occupied by ISIS for over a year. With the support of the coalition air force, they were able to reclaim 25 villages and a residential area of roughly 50 square kilometers, in addition to killing over 16 ISIS members and taking their munitions.

The battle began on three fronts, southeast of Qamishli, south of the town of Tel Maarouf, and southwest of Kahtaneya. The YPG used heavy weaponry, tanks, armors and cannons. Meanwhile, the coalition air force targeted many areas controlled by ISIS, leading to the death of dozens of its members.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of YPG fighters preparing for military operation

Wide of shops

These photographs depict the conflict

Travelling of smoke

Moving shot of armoured excavation vehicle

Various of YPG tanks and military vehicles
Various of YPG fighters
Wide of shots with broken windows
Wide of YPG fighters
Wide of smoke rising
Traveling of field, smoke rising
Traveling of closed shops
Traveling of fallen electric cables
Wide of YPG armored personnel carrier
Various of fighters

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Younes al-Jabouri, Arab YPG fighter
03:52- 04:45
“In the name of God, The operation began yesterday when the YPG liberated 30 villages all the way to [UNINTELLIGIBLE] and we killed around seven [fighters]. We will continue; we are getting closer to Tell Hamis, and we will keep going from Syria into Iraq. Wherever we find terrorism, we will fight it. My nom de guerre is Abu Kassar [UNINTELLIGIBLE].

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Man) Yasser Khaniqa, YPG field commander

04:48 – 05:30
“We started the operation yesterday to liberate most of the areas occupied by ISIS. We liberated 30 villages starting with rural Qamishli and heading toward Tel Hamees in the southeast. The operation is continuing with positive results: dozens of villages have been liberated, such as Taya, Kherbet Tair, Farsook, Taweel, Deibe, Naege, not to mention many farms. They also killed over 16 members of ISIS. The operation will continue until we have liberated all the areas and the people can return to their villages.”

Various of Yasser Khaniqa handling weapon
Various of fighters preparing food in the outdoors
Various of military vehicles
Traveling of two fighters walking with their rifles

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Man) Javan Mohamad, Kurdish fighter

08: 01 – 08:30
“We were able to reach Tel Hamees; we liberated dozens of villages; members of ISIS are escaping because of our strikes; we killed dozens of ISIS members; our operations will continue; we will win.”

Traveling of road

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Fighters and Civilians Celebrate Kurd...
Countryside of Al-Qamishli
By Bedir
23 Feb 2015

NOTE Graphic scenes were removed from this video. If you are interested in obtaining them please contact Transterra Media.

People’s Protection Units (YPG) are advancing near Qamishli and have already retaken over 25 villages in military operations against ISIS all throughout Syria. The YPG began a military campaign about two days ago against villages and urban centers controlled by ISIS located in rural areas to the south of Qamishli.

The military operation continues for the third consecutive day with the support of coalition air forces. With their help, the YPG were able to liberate dozens of villages.
This operation was well received by both the Arab and Kurdish inhabitants of these villages, who both demonstrated their support when the YPG entered their villages to free them from the control of ISIS, which is restricting them and denying them their freedom.

Soundbites

(Arabic, man) Ali al-Hameed, Arab YPG fighter:
“Our goal is to rid all the villages in the area of ISIS; the YPG are quickly advancing. We are all brothers in fighting ISIS.

(Kurdish, man) Hoker Hussein, Kurdish fighter:
“We are here to avenge our martyrs who died in previous battles in Tilhamis. We get our strength and determination from the blood of the martyrs and the support of our people and, thanks to them, we shall win against ISIS.”

(Kurdish, woman) Mother of female fighter:
“We are here today to show loyalty to the blood of our martyrs. We have a good spirit and we have complete faith in our victory and that we are going to liberate our area from ISIS.”

(Kurdish, man) Idris Taher Aziz, Kurdish civilian from the village of Kherbet Jehash:
“When ISIS came close to our villages, we escaped their violent assaults. Now we have decided to return to our village after it was liberated by the YPG. We are happy to return home and, thanks to the YPG, life is slowly getting back to normal.”

(Arab, man) Majeed al-Habib, an Arab from the village of Bazoona:
“ISIS treated us horribly. They used to implement tough laws; they banned us from smoking; they forced women to wear the Niqab; and threatened our religious sites in the village. When the YPG entered and liberated us, we were very happy and welcomed them.”

(Kurdish, man): Nori, Kurdish fighter:

“When you look at those documents and papers, you see strange laws and regulations, as if you were living 2000 years before this time. It really indicates how retrograde their mentality is and how much suffering they have imposed on people. We have 7 ISIS fighters’ corpses, some are Arabs, some are foreigners. One had a Saudi flag, indicating the Saudi identity of some of them.”

Shotlist

Interviews with the fighters and shots of the liberated villages.
Shots of the liberated villages and their civilians
Interviews with the civilians
Various of YPG’s military forces
Various of remnants, documents and possessions, including flag of Saudi Arabia, presumably left behind by ISIS
Various of Nori, the fighter, speaking

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Fighters and Civilians Celebrate Kurd...
Countryside of Al-Qamishli
By Bedir
23 Feb 2015

People’s Protection Units (YPG) are advancing near Qamishli and have already retaken over 25 villages in military operations against ISIS all throughout Syria. The YPG began a military campaign about two days ago against villages and urban centers controlled by ISIS located in rural areas to the south of Qamishli.

The military operation continues for the third consecutive day with the support of coalition air forces. With their help, the YPG were able to liberate dozens of villages.
This operation was well received by both the Arab and Kurdish inhabitants of these villages, who both demonstrated their support when the YPG entered their villages to free them from the control of ISIS, which is restricting them and denying them their freedom.

Soundbites

(Arabic, man) Ali al-Hameed, Arab YPG fighter:
“Our goal is to rid all the villages in the area of ISIS; the YPG are quickly advancing. We are all brothers in fighting ISIS.

(Kurdish, man) Hoker Hussein, Kurdish fighter:
“We are here to avenge our martyrs who died in previous battles in Tilhamis. We get our strength and determination from the blood of the martyrs and the support of our people and, thanks to them, we shall win against ISIS.”

(Kurdish, woman) Mother of female fighter:
“We are here today to show loyalty to the blood of our martyrs. We have a good spirit and we have complete faith in our victory and that we are going to liberate our area from ISIS.”

(Kurdish, man) Idris Taher Aziz, Kurdish civilian from the village of Kherbet Jehash:
“When ISIS came close to our villages, we escaped their violent assaults. Now we have decided to return to our village after it was liberated by the YPG. We are happy to return home and, thanks to the YPG, life is slowly getting back to normal.”

(Arab, man) Majeed al-Habib, an Arab from the village of Bazoona:
“ISIS treated us horribly. They used to implement tough laws; they banned us from smoking; they forced women to wear the Niqab; and threatened our religious sites in the village. When the YPG entered and liberated us, we were very happy and welcomed them.”

(Kurdish, man): Nori, Kurdish fighter:

“When you look at those documents and papers, you see strange laws and regulations, as if you were living 2000 years before this time. It really indicates how retrograde their mentality is and how much suffering they have imposed on people. We have 7 ISIS fighters’ corpses, some are Arabs, some are foreigners. One had a Saudi flag, indicating the Saudi identity of some of them.”

Shotlist

Interviews with the fighters and shots of the liberated villages.
Shots of the liberated villages and their civilians
Interviews with the civilians
Shots of YPG’s military forces
Various of remnants, documents and possessions presumably left by left behind by ISIS fighters, including Saudi Arabia flag
Various of Nori, the fighter, speaking
Various of ISIS fighters corpses being held by the YPG

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Iraqi Assyrians Denounce ISIS Transgr...
Erbil
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
23 Feb 2015

Opinions of Assyrians in Erbil, Iraq about the abduction of 150 Assyrians in Syria and the destruction of historical artifacts in Mosul.

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IS attack on Makhmour District South ...
Makhmour
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
21 Feb 2015

NOTE: No audio from 3:30 to 4:17

In the evening of Feb. 21st, IS launched their second attack in three days on the Makhmour District 35 miles south of Erbil. The Makhmour District is important to the IS because it is their lifeline to Kirkuk and Mosul. Around 21.00 PM an estimated 200 IS fighters entered the village of Tel Rim. After 3 hours of fighting and 8 airstrikes 63 IS fighters died and IS retreated.

This footage shows Makhmour commander Najat Ali Salih arriving in Tel Rim on the morning of 22 Feb. He surveys the village and boasts about knowing about the attack beforehand because of his IS spies. After seeing many dead IS fighters he leaves the town. On the road back one of the Humvees in his convoy hits an IED and three wounded Peshmerga are driven off.

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Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
20 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war. The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters. Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo. In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon. The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

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Anti-Terrorism Protest in Benghazi Ca...
Benghazi
By Mohammad Salama
20 Feb 2015

February 20, 2015
Benghazi, Libya

Scores of Libyans staged an anti-terrorism demonstration in al-Keesh Square Benghazi on Friday, February 20, 2015.

The demonstrators called for the backing of the Libyan army and for the international community to support the Tobruk based government's demand at the UN Security Council to lift the ban on arms sales, and to provide the army with the necessary support to fight terrorism.

The demonstrations came following a triple suicide bomb attack in the eastern town of al-Qubbah, which claimed more than 40 lives.

The attacks were claimed by the 'Islamic State' in retaliation, they said, for the air strikes carried out on the IS stronghold of Derna earlier this week.

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Islamic State Militants Attack Peshme...
Makhmour
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
19 Feb 2015

General Sirwan Barzani, Commander Najat Salih and Peshmerga soldier Rokan comment on the IS attack in Makhmour two nights ago.

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Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
18 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war.

The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters.

Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo.

In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon.
The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Teenage Fighter
09:17 – 12:19
Why do you not speak Norwegian?
I do not know how to.
Why?
I came to Iraq a long time ago and I cannot speak [Norwegian].
Did you not learn Norwegian at school?
I was young. When I came from Norway I was young. I had not gone to school.
How old were you?
About four years old.
Do you wish to return?
Yes.
Why? Why do you want to return?
The country there is better and safer.
What are you doing in Iraq?
I study at the hawza [Shiite religious school].
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
In Iraq there are holy shrines which I visited. My father came here to practice jihad. He went to Jarf al-Sakhr. I am proud of him for practicing jihad. I went with him after they liberated the area. I wore his military vest and went with him.
That was after the liberation?
Yes, after the liberation was over.
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
I am proud of him. I am proud of my father and his position as an Iraqi military.
Do you feel scared sometimes?
No.
Do you feel scared that ISIS is killing people in Iraq?
No. I do not feel scared.
You do not feel scared?
No.
Are you scared of getting killed?
No, I am not.
Why not?
There is nothing to worry about here.
Did you participate in any major battle?
No. I used to go with my father to [the battlefield] after the battle was over.
Do you not think that you are too young [to be part of an armed group]?
No.
I have not fought. I used to go to a certain area after the liberation was over.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
No.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway to and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
I did not come to Iraq to fight. I came to study and be with my people and near the holy shrines.
Is there anything that you miss in Norway? Do you miss any people? Do you have certain good memories? Do you miss any friends or neighbors?
I miss them sometimes but we came to Iraq for the sake of the Imams and to study.

Frame 0004
Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
18 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war.

The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters.

Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo.

In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon.
The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abbas al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander:

Abbas al-Asadi: “I will be heading to Samaraa, after this interview a car will come and pick us up and we will go there.

Interviewer: Did you just return from Samaraa for this interview?

Abbas: “No, I came to see my family but they [Army commanders] called me and told me to return. I am now in the army fighting ISIS but I need to return. They need me there. I took a few days off and went there, but now they need me, they called me and I have to return.”

Interviewer: Don't you think you are breaking the Norwegian law, or technically the law in all of Europe, by letting your children participate in war?

Abbas: “I will not break the Norwegian law or the Arabic law. My children came with me after the area was liberated, after the area became safe and the families returned to it. But my little child likes to wear my uniform and I taught him how to shoot just so he can have some experience. But he does not participate in war with me. I know he cannot participate in war, war is not for him.”

Interviewer: The last time we met with them, your children told us that they participated in war and in victories and in fighting ISIS. What is the reason for such statements?

Abbas: “He considers himself to be one with his father, and since his father participated and he entered Jurf al-Sakher after it was liberated, he considered himself as a participant. Of course he did not participate in the battles in Jurf al-Sakher, do you think I would want death for my son? It is impossible.”

Interviewer: When was the last time you went to Norway?

Abbas: “I was there last in 2008.”

Interviewer: Do you intend to return to Norway and if so, when?

Abbas: “Yes I intend to return to Norway, after the war with ISIS ends.”

Interviewer: How many are in your family?

Abbas: “Some of them are living in Oslo, and I have another son who is a doctor in America. According to our beliefs, a person who leaves jihad is an infidel. We ask God to help us and support us.”

Interviewer: Is your wife pleased with what you are doing?

Abbas: “Yes my wife is proud of me because I am fighting with the good people against the enemies.”
Interviewer: What do you want to tell the Norwegian government and the European Union who might think that you brought your son to participate in war?
Abbas: “I did not and will not involve my son in war, I repeat that, I did not and will not involve any of my youngest children in war. They go to school.. just like in anywhere else. When we liberated the area, many people and journalists came and my son was one of those people. He wanted to wear my uniform, and I allowed him to. It has nothing to do with war. We fought him the Arabic traditions, such as shooting, horseback riding, and other simple things. If a war happens in Norway, God forbid, I am willing to fight alongside them. If Norway or Europe needs me to fight, I will definitely help them. Norway is my country and Iraq is my country.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Teenage Fighter
09:17 – 12:19
Why do you not speak Norwegian?
I do not know how to.
Why?
I came to Iraq a long time ago and I cannot speak [Norwegian].
Did you not learn Norwegian at school?
I was young. When I came from Norway I was young. I had not gone to school.
How old were you?
About four years old.
Do you wish to return?
Yes.
Why? Why do you want to return?
The country there is better and safer.
What are you doing in Iraq?
I study at the hawza [Shiite religious school].
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
In Iraq there are holy shrines which I visited. My father came here to practice jihad. He went to Jarf al-Sakhr. I am proud of him for practicing jihad. I went with him after they liberated the area. I wore his military vest and went with him.
That was after the liberation?
Yes, after the liberation was over.
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
I am proud of him. I am proud of my father and his position as an Iraqi military.
Do you feel scared sometimes?
No.
Do you feel scared that ISIS is killing people in Iraq?
No. I do not feel scared.
You do not feel scared?
No.
Are you scared of getting killed?
No, I am not.
Why not?
There is nothing to worry about here.
Did you participate in any major battle?
No. I used to go with my father to [the battlefield] after the battle was over.
Do you not think that you are too young [to be part of an armed group]?
No.
I have not fought. I used to go to a certain area after the liberation was over.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
No.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway to and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
I did not come to Iraq to fight. I came to study and be with my people and near the holy shrines.
Is there anything that you miss in Norway? Do you miss any people? Do you have certain good memories? Do you miss any friends or neighbors?
I miss them sometimes but we came to Iraq for the sake of the Imams and to study.

Frame 0004
ISIS Beheaded Her Father
Dohuk
By rsoufi
16 Feb 2015

The family of a kidnapped Kurdish soldier found out about of his death through a video of his beheading, released by ISIS on January 26. Houkan Surji was captured by the jihadist group after he was wounded in battle on August 6, 2014. Over the six months of his imprisonment his family had absolutely no contact with him and only found out about his death via an online video.

The Transterra Media contributor visited the family home in the village of Berdsur, east of Dohuk and found that they were in the process of moving house. Donors from their community came together and bought the family a new home elsewhere in Dohuk, as their old house held too many painful memories.

This public video released by ISIS is an edited version of the beheading:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TWWK0lfd8wU

Transcript:

The family of a kidnapped Kurdish soldier found out about of his death through a video of his beheading, released by ISIS on January 26. Houkan Surji was captured by the jihadist group after he was wounded in battle on August 6, 2014. Over the six months of his imprisonment his family had absolutely no contact with him and only found out about his death via an online video.
The Transterra Media contributor visited the family home in the village of Berdsur, east of Dohuk and found that they were in the process of moving house. Donors from their community came together and bought the family a new home elsewhere in Dohuk, as their old house held too many painful memories.

SOUNDBITE (Woman, Kurdish) Avin Hojam, daughter of Kurdish fighter decapitated by ISIS
00:07 - 05:06
How did you father treat his family?
He treated us very well.
How?
He treated us well and was jovial. He treated all his relatives and friends with innocence and a spirit full of love and appreciation.
When he headed to fulfill his military duties, did you not stop him from going to the battlefield?
No, we did not, because he was defending the honor, dignity and land of Kurdistan. My father was willing to defend the land of Kurdistan for the sake of honor and dignity.
There are other people who were killed by ISIS. What do you think of this, given that ISIS claim to be Muslims?
They are not Muslims. Had they been Muslims, they would not have treated Muslims like this. Did your father communicate with you while he was on the frontline fighting against ISIS? Yes, he spoke with us all the time.
How did you find out that he was detained by ISIS?
We knew that he was with a group of people, some of whom were killed while the others were injured. My father was among the injured. He was shot in the leg and taken prisoner by ISIS. They took him on August 6, 2014 and on January 26, 2015, he was martyred by ISIS.
When your father was on the front, what did he talk to you about?
He spoke about honor, dignity, and his willingness to die to defend the land of Kurdistan.
When he was at home, did he use to talk about the frontline as well?
Yes, he spoke with us a lot about that.
What do you think about ISIS practices, especially with Yezidi women?
These acts are unfair, whether they are committed against Muslims or others.
What do think should be done to correct this situation?
I call on all people to defend Kurdistan and protect their honor and dignity. I even call on civilians to head to the frontlines.
How many members are there in your family?
We are six boys and five girls.
Who supports your family at the moment?
All of our relatives, as well as benefactors, offer us help.
Do you need anything?
Our situation is good at the moment. The government and benefactors have offered us a lot of aid.
Do you feel that your family lacks anything after your father died?
Yes.
Can you talk about the void that your father’s [death] has left in your life?
It had a great impact on us. We had not seen him for six months, during which he was detained. We were always avidly waiting to know what he had in his heart. We wanted him to tell what he was thinking. We are very touched and realize quite well the void he has left in our life.
Have you received his body?
No. We were longing to see him and we had not received any call from him for six months.
While he was detained, were you not able to communicate with him?
No. I swear to God, we did not receive any news of him from August 6 to January 26, 2015.
What would you like to say to the Islamic State group?
They are not Muslims. Had they been Muslims, they would not have acted as such.
What would you like to say to the international community?
I pray that my father’s blood does not go in vain, and that work is done to give us his body. I pray that these countries are not allowed to exist in any country.

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Man) Issa, the cousin of the Kurdish fighter Hojam, decapitated by ISIS
00:03 - 03:20
How did you find out about Hojam’s killing?
I knew through Facebook.
Did you see the video of his execution?
What did you see and how did you feel?
I was moved a lot.
How?
I was very moved because he was killed in an unusual way.
What did you feel that moment?
I swear to God that I wished to have revenge against them and exterminate them.
How can you describe this [act]?
This is an inhumane act.
Why?
It is an inhumane act and even infidels do not do what these monsters have done.
What do you think should be done?
We call on foreign countries, such as the international coalition, the United States, Britain, Germany and France to strike and exterminate them.
Does this mean that this is not a personal issue?
No, it is not a personal issue. Even though the person who killed Hojam was Kurdish, he belonged to ISIS.
Do you mean that this danger affect everybody.
Yes, this is a danger that affects everybody – Arab countries, foreign countries and everybody else.
Do you think that Hojam’s killing has caused a void in your family?
No, no. God willing, there will not be any void.
Are you part of the Peshmerga?
We are all part of the Peshemerga. Those who were not part of the Peshmerga are now part of it.
In which area do you perform your duties with the Peshmerga?
In Zumar, which is near Tal Afar.
Was Hojam in Zumar?
No, he was in Oweiza.
Where was he taken prisoner?
In the Shallallat area.
After that, what did you hear about him?
No… We know that he was alive, but we did not know any information about him until he was killed.
Did you not try to have him released with the mediation of certain people or Arab tribes?
We tried a lot, with all our means, but it was in vain. They are not part of a government or a state and nobody can deal with them.
How do you think this organization should be dealt with? What do you think about its future?
By God, in the future they shall fail. They have no future. God willing, they will be destroyed.
What about the future of these children?
They are not guilty of anything; they have been betrayed.
What would you like to say to the world?
We say that the countries of the coalition, the Gulf and all the other countries should stand against these people.

لقاء مع أفين هوجام أبنة المقاتل هوجام الذي ذبحته داعش :

السؤال (00:07) كيف كان تعامل والدك مع العائلة؟ (00:09) الجواب (00:10) والدي كان جيدا جدا في تعامله معنا (00:11) السؤال (00:12) كيف (00:13)؟ الجواب(00:15) كان جيدا في تعامله معنا وكان مرحاً معنا وكان يتعامل مع الجميع من أهله وأصدقائه ببراءة وروح مليئة بالحب والتقدير (00:33) السؤال (00:34) عندما توجه إلى واجبه العسكري في المعركة ألم تمنعوه عن الذهاب إلى جبهة القتال؟ (00:40) الجواب (00:41) لا .. لا لم نقله له ذلك لأنه كان يدافع عن شرف وكرامة كردستان ويحمي أرضها.. كان والدي مستعدا للدفاع عن كردستان من أجل الشرف والكرامة (00:56) السؤال (01:00) هناك ناس آخرون أيضا قتلتهم داعش كيف ترون هذا الشيء بينما يدعي أعضاء التنظيم أنهم مسلمون؟ (01:10) الجواب (00:11) هؤلاء ليسوا مسلمين، وإن كانوا مسلمين فيجب ألا يعاملون المسلمين بهذا الشكل. (00:15) السؤال (01:17) عندما كان والدك في جبهة القتال ضد داعش هل كان يتواصل معكم؟ (01:23) الجواب (01:24) نعم كان يتواصل معنا بإستمرار(00:27) السؤال(01:28) كيف عرفتم بأسره من قبل داعش؟ (01:319) الجواب (00:31) نعم علمنا أنه كان مع عدد من الأشخاص بعضهم قتلوا والبعض الآخر أصيب بجروح وكان والدي من بين الجرحى وأصيب رصاص برجله عندما أعتقله مسلحو داعش وأخذوه في يوم (6 من شهر آب 2014). تم أسره. وفي يوم (26 كانون الثاني 2015) استشهد على أيدي داعش (01:53) السؤال (01:55) عندما كان والدكم في الجبهة وكنتم تتواصلون معه عن ماذا كان يتحدث معكم؟ (02:00) الجواب (02:01) يتحدث عن الشرف والكرامة والإستعداد بالتضحية من اجل حماية أرض كردستان لحد الموت (02:10) السؤال (02:11) وعندما كان في البيت هل كان يتحدث عن جبهات القتال أيضاً (02:24) الجواب (02:25) نعم كان يتحدث معنا كثيرا عن ذلك (02:27) السؤال (02:29) كيف ترين ممارسات داعش إتجاه هذه الأعمال خصوصا تجاه النساء الإيزيديات أو غيرهن (02:42) الجوال(02:43) هذه الأعمال غير عادلة، لا مع المسلمين ولا مع غيرهم (02:45) السؤال (02:46) كيف ترين السبيل إلى معالجة هذه الأوضاع؟(00:49) الجواب (02:49) أدعو جميع الناس إلى الدفاع عن كردستان وحماية شرفهم وكرامتهم، وادعو حتى المدنيين للتوجه إلى جبهات القتال (03:00) السؤال (03:01) كم يبلغ عدد أعضاء أسرتكم؟ (03:05) الجواب (03:06) نحن 6 أولاد و5 أخوات (03:08) السؤال (03:09) من يعيل أسرتكم حالياً؟ (03:10) الجواب (03:11) الجميع من أقاربنا والناس الخيريين يقدمون لنا المساعدة (03:16) السؤال (03:18) هل تحتاجون حاليا إلى أي شيء؟(03:22) الجواب (03:24) وضعنا جيد حاليا الحكومة والأشخاص الخيريين قدموا لنا المساعدة كثيرا (03:27) السؤال (03:28) بعد مقتل والدك هل تشعرون أن شيء ما نقص من عائلتك(03:42) الجواب (03:43) نعم (03:44) السؤال (03:44) هل بإمكانك التحدث عن الفراغ الذي تركه والدك في حياتكم (03:55) الجواب (03:56) كانه له تأثير كبير علينا .. لم نره بقي ستة أشهر معتقلا في السجن وكنا دائما تواقين لمعرفة ماكان في قلبه ليقول لنا قبل رحيله. نحن متأثرون جدا وندرك جيدا الفراغ الذي تركه في حياتنا (04:14) السؤال (04:15) هل استلمتم جثته؟(04:15) الجواب(04:16) لا .. نحن كنا مشتاقون لرؤيته ولم نتلق أي اغتصال منه منذ ستة أشهر (04:22) السؤال (04:24) عندما كان أسيرا ألم تستطيعوا الاتصال به؟ (04:27) الجواب (04:28) لا لا والله منذ يوم 6 آب وإلى 26 كانون الثاني 2015 لم نتلق أي خبر عنه(04:34) السؤال (04:37) ماذا تريدين أن تقولي لتنظيم الدولة الإسلامية؟ (04:44) الجواب (04:45) أنهم ليسوا مسلمين وإذا كانوا مسلمون كيف يتعاملون بهذا الشكل (04:49) السؤال (04:50) ماذا تريدين أن تقولي للمجتمع الدولي؟(04:54) الجواب (04:54) أدعو أن لا يدع دم والدي يذهب هدرا والعمل على تسليمنا جثته وأن لايسمح بوجود هؤلاء الوحوش في أية دولة(05:06)

2 مقابلة مع (عيسى ) أبن عم المقاتل هوجام الذي ذبح من قبل داعش

السؤال (00:03) كيف عرفت بمقتل هوجام (00:06) الجواب (00:07) عرفت بواسطة الفيسبوك (00:11) السؤال (00:13) هل رأيت المشهد عن كيفية قتله(00:13) الجواب (00:14) نعم (00:14) السؤال (00:15) ماذا رأيت و بماذا شعرت؟(00:16) الجواب (00:17) والله تأثرت كثيرا(00:18) السؤال (00:18) كيف (00:18) الجواب (00:19) والله تأثرت كثيرا لأنه قتل بشكل غريب (00:24) السؤال (00:25) يعني ماذا كان شعورك في تلك اللحظة؟(00:28) الجواب (00:29) والله كنت أتنمى الإنتقام منهم وإبادتهم (00:34) السؤال (00:35) كيف يمكنه وصفه؟(00:36) الجواب (00:38) هذا عمل غير إنساني (00:39) السؤال (00:40) كيف؟ (00:41) الجواب (00:41) عمل لا إنساني وحتى الكفار لايمارسون العمل هؤلاء وحوش (00:47) السؤال (00:48) برأيك مالذي يجب فعله؟ (00:49) الجواب (00:50) نحن نطالب الدول الأجنبية مثل دول التحالف و أمريكا وبريطانيا وألمانيا وفرنسا بضربهم وإبادتهم (00:59) السؤال (01:00) هذه ليست قضية شخصية؟(01:01) الجواب (01:01) لا ليست قضية شخصية، صحيح أن الذي قتل هوجام كان كرديا لكنه ينتمي لداعش (01:07) السؤال (01:08) تقصد أن هذا الخطر يطال الجميع؟ (01:09) الجواب(01:10) نعم هذا خطر على جميع الناس وحتى الدول الأجنبية والعربية وعلى الجميع(01:17) السؤال (01:22) هل ترى أن مقتل هوجام أحدث فراغا في عائلتكم؟ (01:25) الجواب (01:26) لا لا إنشاء الله لن يحدث أي فراغ (01:31) السؤال (01:32) هل أنتم أعضاء في البيشمركة؟ (01:32) الجواب(01:33) نعم نحن جميعا بيشمركة والذي لم يكن ينتمي للبيشمركة أصبح ضمن البيشمركة(01:39) السؤال (01:45) في أي منطقة تؤدي واجبك في قوات البيشمركة؟ (01:46) الجواب (01:46) في منطقة زمار القريبة من تلعفر(01:49) السؤال (01:50) وهل كان هوجام في منطقة زمار؟(01:50) الجواب (01:51) لا كان في منطقة بعويزة (01:52) السؤال (01:52) وأين أعتقل؟ (01:54) الجواب (01:54) في منطقة الشلالات (01:57) السؤال(01:58) وبعدها ماذا كانت أخباره؟ (01:59) الجواب (02:00) لا .. كنا نعرف أنه حي لكننا لم نعرف أية معلومات عنه لحين قتله (02:10) السؤال (02:11) ألم تحاولوا إطلاق سراحه عبر تدخل أو بواسطة بعض الأشخاص أو روؤساء العشائرالعربية؟ (02:18) الجواب(02:19) والله حاولنا كثيرا وبكل إمكانياتنا لكن دون جدوى هؤلاء ليسوا حكومة ولادولة ولا أحد يستطيع التعامل معهم (02:35) السؤال (02:36) برأيك كيف يكون التعامل مع هذا التنظيم وماهو مستقبله؟ (02:45) الجواب (02:46) والله هؤلاء مستقبلهم فاشل ولا مستقبل لهم إنشاء الله وسيدمرون (02:53) السؤال (02:54) وهؤلاء الأطفال كيف سيكون (مستقبلهم)؟ (02:55) الجواب (02:56) لا ذنب لهم وهم تعرضوا للغدر(03:01) السؤال (03:03) أنتم ماذا تريدون أن قوله للعالم (03:11) الجواب (03:12) نقول لهم قوموا بوجه هؤلاء يا دول التحالف ودول الخليج العربي وكلهم (03:20)

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Censored Video From ISIS-Controlled D...
Deir-al-Zor
By abd alkareem
15 Feb 2015

Deir al-Zor, Syria

February 15, 2015

This video was recorded in the ISIS-controlled city of Deir al-Zor, in eastern Syria with the approval ISIS. The cameraman was escorted by a member of the group during the recording and the video was subjected to review and censorship by ISIS.
The appearance of this video on the Transterra Media website does not in anyway constitute an endorsement by Transterra Media of ISIS or any claims or statements made in this video.

The video shows detainees held by the ISIS police force, known as Al-Hisba. The detainees are believed to have been arrested for smoking or not praying, which are considered crimes according to ISIS’ interpretation of Islamic Sharia law. The video offers an insight of the moral disciplining and law enforcement measures practiced by ISIS.
In addition the video shows a nighttime public gathering and scenes of Deir al-Zor streets, where ISIS banners and propaganda billboards are conspicuous.
The video also shows ISIS fighters firing weapons in what is believed to be a battle against Syrian Army forces in the Huweijat Saqe area near Deir al

SHOTLIST and TRANSCRIPT

Zoom out of “reconciliation hall” door/ L-R pan inside police station.

Wide of ISIS security members and civilians inside police station.

Medium of poster declaring “The 10 practices that nullify faith in Islam.” Zoom out of detainees sitting under the poster/ R-L pan of detainees seemingly reading the Quran.

Various of preacher talking to detainees NAT Sound (Arabic, Man), Unnamed ISIS Preacher
01:04 – 01:33
“[Citing a saying by the Prophet Mohammad] That which differentiates us from them [unbelievers] is our performance of prayer. He who abandons it becomes a unbeliever. Imam Ahmad, a man for whose existence we thank God, said: ‘He who abandons prayers deliberately and out of laziness is a unbeliever.’ This is not a simple matter. It is a matter of belief or disbelief, of going to paradise or hell.”

Wide of man calling for praying for prayer as detainees prepare to start praying.

SOUNDBITE (ARABIC, Man) Unnamed detainee
01:51 – 02:01
“I was arrested for smoking. I have been here for two hours. There is no problem. All of this is in our interest.”

SOUNDBITE (ARABIC, Man) Unnamed detainee
02:02 – 02:49
- You were inside the police station, right? - Yes. - How long have were you arrested for? - Three or four days. - What was your charge? - I was accused of smoking.
- How were you treated inside? - The treatment is in accordance with Islam. - Did you see anything that was not good? - No, no. - Did anyone force to do anything? - No, everything was according to God’s Sharia. - Did you see anyone at the police station who being treated better than you were? - No, no. Everybody was treated the same way. There was no difference among people. - No you have been released by the police. Will you be arrested again? - No, no. I will commit this sin again.

Wide of released detainee talking to ISIS security officers.

Traveling shot of released detainee walking with security officer out of police station.

Various shots of children and adults watching ISIS propaganda film featuring battles in a public square.

Various shots of crowd waving ISIS flags. NAT Sound (Arabic) Crowd repeat after man speaking over loudspeaker (05:02 - 5:17): “The prophet is our leader; the Quran is our constitution; the State of the Caliphate is our state.”

Close-up/zoom out propaganda CDs with the title “The evidence that a woman’s face should be covered” being handed out to crowd of young men.

Moving shot of ISIS fighter handing out chocolate to children.

Wide/zoom out of street lined with ISIS flags.

Traveling of road sign at the entrance of Deir al-Zor and street. NAT Sound (Arabic): ISIS anthem/ billboard promoting hijab (6:43)

Various shots of ISIS flags hung on street light poles (07:15). Wide of billboard discouraging smoking. The right-hand side of the billboard bears what appears to be the image of miswak, a plant the prophet recommended for good breath in the Quranic verse, “He alloweth unto them things clean.” The second half of the billboard features what appears to be a cigarette stub, as well as the Quranic verse “And He forbiddeth unto them things impure.” The billboard is signed: “The Islamic State, Province of the Good,” the name given to Deir al-Zor by ISIS.

Various of ISIS flags hung on street light poles

Medium/zoom out of billboard: “There shall be a caliphate according to the Prophet’s path,” signed by the Islamic State.

Close-up/ zoom out of ISIS flags hung on street light poles.

Tilt down on ISIS flags hung on street light poles/zoom in on billboard: “There shall be a caliphate according to the Prophet’s path,” signed by the Islamic State.

Traveling of street; billboard reads: “There shall be caliphate according to the Prophet’s path”

Various of women wearing the niqab walking in market.

L-R pan of shops/ lettering on the wall reads: “O God, bring your victory soon.”

Wide of women Various of women wearing the niqab walking in market

Moving shot of ISIS fighters in a speed boat moving in the Euphrates NAT Sound (Arabic) fighter: "The State of Islam shall remain despite the awakenings and the Alawites.”

Various of fighters firing a heavy machine gun in an exchange of fire NAT Sound (Arabic) Unseen man: (12:22 – 12:37) “God is great! A mujahid returns the fire at regime troops at Huweijat Saqer. (13:15 – 13:17) The state of Islam shall remain.”

13:26: Nat SOUND fighters, “The state of Islam shall remain.”

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Living Conditions “Extremely Bad” in ...
Jarabulus
By TTM Contributor 34
13 Feb 2015

Jarabulus, Syria
February 13, 2015

This video offers a rare glimpse of daily life in Jarabulus, an ISIS-controlled Syrian town on the border with Turkey, located around 120 km northwest of Aleppo.
Video contains interviews with two anonymous residents who complained about their economic conditions, saying that basic commodities are unaffordable while there are few employment opportunities.

The footage, which was shot secretly, shows what is believed to be ISIS headquarters destroyed by international coalition-led airstrikes. It also shows local residents in markets and agriculture fields inside and near Jarabulus.

Fighters from the Nusra Front, considered the Syrian branch of al-Qaeda, took over the town in 2013 and later pledged allegiance to ISIS. More than 200,000 Kurds and Arabs in Jarabulus and the surrounding villages have lived under ISIS since early 2014.

The name of the contributor has been withheld for security reasons.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Traveling of fields/ road sign “Jarablus”
Wide of destroyed bridge on river
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of destroyed buildings
Wide of ISIS religious teachings
Traveling of street
Wide of lettering on a wall (ISIS religious teachings)
Various of official printed announcements by ISIS posted outside a building/ close up of seal “The Islamic State, Department of Agriculture, Jarabulus District”
L-R pan of field
Wide of children sliding down a hill
Various of boat rowing in the Euphrates River
Wide of planted vegetables
Wide/ L-R pan of orchard
Various of sheep grazing
Close-up of a person cutting firewood
Various of woman cooking using a stove
Various of a woman milking a cow
Various of oil containers for sale on the roadside
Medium of man at fish market
Various of vegetables for sale at market
Wide of field and sheep herd
Traveling of people in an outdoor market
Various of clothes and shoes for sale
Various of spices for sale
Various of market
Various of crowd at market
Various of food items for sale
Wide/ traveling inside health center

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
09:54 – 12:16

“The situation is not good. I cannot say that we are comfortable. Our situation is very bad. A diesel barrel costs 20,000 [Syrian pounds]. How can we afford it? A gas canister costs 4,000 [Syrian pounds] and a liter of kerosene costs 225 pounds. A pack of bread costs 130 pounds. How can we afford this? I have two young men who are unemployed. Where can they go? “The [Islamic] State is good. They have caught the debauched and the thieves who have hurt people, but they provide electricity and water for only two hours [a day]. For more than a year, people have barely seen electricity. It is provided during two hours but the grid is overloaded and the current is interrupted after half an hour. The bakery was not functioning; they repaired it but bread is expensive. We cannot afford it. I bake bread myself.

“As for warplanes… Our houses have been fractured. These countries have formed a coalition against us. We live in a border town. Bombing goes on night and day.

“They should have bombed the tyrant who has deprived us of everything. He has ruined everything. Whenever our children went out to look for work they were accused of being criminals and caught. All our young men have been put in jail. What can we do? The situation is bad.

“We use firewood. We had olive trees but we cut them down and burned them in the stove to have heat in this cold weather.

“I have a cow. Animal feed is expensive. A kilogram of hay costs 50 pounds. A bale of barely that contains 40 kg costs 2,700 pounds. We need this cow to feed us. All the people who have cattle suffer the same crisis that we do. It is not only me; all of us suffer a bad situation. We wish that we die. There is not a single house that has not been fractured due to warplanes.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Jarabulus Resident
12:17 – 13: 19

“Conditions under the Islamic State are extremely bad. Under the Islamic State, a barrel of diesel costs more than $100. A ton of firewood costs 22,000 [pounds]. This crisis has never been witnessed before.

“Nothing has improved under the Islamic State. Everything has deteriorated. They should create employment for the people. The people work in agricultural lands, which do not provide any revenue. We have abandoned our land. Not all the plots are being cultivated. People have cut down olive groves and used them as firewood. The situation is extremely miserable. There are no services and foreign countries are not providing aid. The Islamic State is in control of the situation. Turkey has closed the border and aid cannot reach people. The situation is very bad under the Islamic State.”

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Together in Kobane: Former Refugee Re...
Kobane
By Bedir
10 Feb 2015

Kobani, Syria
February 10, 2015

After leaving her hometown of Kobani and living in Turkey for several months, Siddiqa Barkal was happily reunited with her husband and two sons who remained in the city to fight against ISIS. Siddiqa’s three daughters and her youngest son were also rejoiced to return with her.
Siddiqa’s husband, Ismat Sheikh Hassan, is the head of the Defense Committee in the Kobani Canton, part of the autonomous district proclaimed by the Kurdish Democratic Union Party, known by the Kurdish acronym PYD. He was widely quoted by Western media during the battle for Kobani.
Siddiqa says that she was very sad to leave her hometown and live in exile, despite the warm welcome she received in Turkey. She took the risk of returning to Kobani even before ISIS fighters were defeated because her young children could not bear living outside their city.
In Kobani, Siddiqa stood by her husband, sons and other fighters of the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) during the battles and made them food until they won over the battle against ISIS.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of family in living room

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Woman) Siddiqa Barkal, Refugee Who Returned to Kobani

01:01 - 09:45

“We left when ISIS attacked Kobani on [September] 20. We did not leave willingly. We wanted to stay in Kobani and live with the comrades and fighters. We wanted to be martyred with them. Seven days after I left Kobani with my children, they convinced me of returning. We returned but could not enter. My children and I stayed in Suruc. They did not tolerate to live outside Kobani. They kept saying that they wanted to return. I had three girls and a young boy with me. Even though my children could not live outside of Kobani, the situation there did not allow us to return. The father of my children and two of my children were fighting in the city. The rest of my children and I were very worried about them. My young son Hamza used to cry and say, ‘I cannot stand living outside Kobani because my friends are not here. I feel lonely when I am outside my city.’ In Suruc, my children and I were living in a house. My children never left the house during the day. On certain days, they used to sleep during the day and stay up at night watching television. On the 25th of the month, my older daughter went to Kobani. She called me, saying, ‘I cannot take it anymore. My father and two brothers are in Kobani and I need to go and see them. I want to stay in my city, Kobani.’
“I had many friends and acquaintances in northern Turkey who offered to let me live in their homes. I went near to Kobani on several occasions. My young son and I cried as smoke was rising from the buildings. The sound of explosions and gunshots was heard. Warplanes were bombing and the city was being destroyed. We were very worried about our friends who were fighting to defend the city. One day, I decided to return to Kobani while ISIS mercenaries were still there. I called my daughter then to tell her that we were coming and she told her father. My husband called me, saying: ‘Why did you not tell us that you were coming?’ I returned to Kobani and he was very happy. Some were worried that my children would be affected by the scenes of killing and destruction. There were also worried that ISIS was still there. “I used to make dinner for the fighters on the front and help them. We never thought that ISIS could have control over us. Many people used to ask me whether Kobani will fall or not. I used to say to them that Kobani will never fall and that it shall be victorious. 'We will fight until the last drop of our blood and the last stone in the city.’ I kept saying this to the women and mothers. The ideas of leader Abdullah Ocalan were behind the victory. Male and female fighters are fighting by relying on their own capabilities and conviction. They were not pushed by anyone; they were not forced to do this. They are fighting with their hearts, which is why they will achieve victory. For example, when you make a child carry something, he will carry it but he might fail. If he carries it with his own will and strength, he will succeed. The young men and women came from all parts of Kurdistan. We consider the member of the People’s Protection Units and the Women’s Protection Units our sons and daughters and parts of our bodies. They are sacrificing their lives for their land, which is why we will achieve victory. “I cannot describe the way I felt when we returned to Kobani. We felt so much joy. My little son Hamza was thrilled because he returned to his friends. I asked my son on our way back, ‘Who do you want to see first, your brothers or your father?’ He said: ‘I want to return to my friends.’ Friendship is more important for him. When I was in Kobani, I was very happy to see the comrade fighters. I did not believe that I was actually with them, and that I was embraced by Kobani. When the comrade fighters liberated Kobani from ISIS mercenaries, I was trembling. I was so happy that I did not understand what was happening. I asked a woman near me: ‘Am I in Kobani? Has it been liberated?’ “I cannot describe the joy I felt. When I left Kobani, I felt as if one of my sons or the father of my children was martyred. We all cried when we left. Even my young son went to the comrades and held their hands, saying: ‘I want to stay in Kobani and be martyred.’ When I left Kobani, I was told that I would return in seven days. My son was fighting on the eastern front, where battles were the fiercest. I did not tell anyone that I was leaving. When my son heard about it he said: ‘Mother, why are you leaving?’ I told him that I was not leaving willingly, and that I was leaving because the comrades wanted me to. When I left, I did not bid my sons farewell. It was a very painful moment. I cannot forget that moment. The moment I crossed the border was very painful. I cannot describe it. “Now that Kobani has been liberated, people will return to the city in the next few weeks. Those whose houses were destroyed will rebuild their houses. We have to help each other, take care of ourselves and return to our previous lives. We will live a happy life. Rojava [Syrian part of Kurdistan] will be fully liberated from ISIS mercenaries, especially that they were defeated in Kobani. The People’s Protection Units and the Women’s Protection Units have pledged to fight ISIS wherever they were. We, the people, should help the members of these forces who are sacrificing their lives for the homeland.”

Various of family inside the house
Various of young Hamza
Various of family and guests in front of the house

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Turkey: Anti-ISIS Civilian Border Pat...
Turkey-Syria Border
By Ibrahim Karci
08 Feb 2015

From the beginning of the battle for Kobane, many volunteers from numerous districts around Turkey gathered in the villages close to the border to help patrol the border and prevent ISIS fighters from slipping in and out of Syria. Despite the fact that that Kurdish forces have now cleared Kobane of ISIS fighters, volunteers still patrol in the villages close to the border, fearing ISIS remnants will slip through.

TRANSCRIPT

Interview with Halit Çelikarslan – Villager
00.37– 00.50: Since the first day of the resistance, from different parts of Turkey, even from abroad, people came here, with the aim of helping the people resisting in Kobane.

00.52 – 00.56: We received help from them.

00.57 – 01.26: Usually young people and women were coming here. They worked united, stayed in tents for days in bad weather conditions and served the cause in many ways.

Interview with Emin Baran – Lawyer and Volunteer aid worker in Suruc
Journalist:
01.31 – 01.36: Why were the border patrols initially started?

Emin:
01.36 – 01.43 People were passing the border from Kobane to here, so people felt obligated to welcome them, since their passage was stopped frequently [by Turkish border patrols].
01.44 – 01.46 [Turkish] Soldiers tried to keep them in restricted areas.
01.47 – 01.53 Some of them [refugees] were injured. So, to have a front group on the border became necessary.
01.56 – 02.04 After the displacement came to the end, people kept patrolling in order to ensure that ISIS would not get help in Kobane.
02.05 – 02.10 Essentially, it was aimed to not letting ISIS gain strength in Kobane by using Turkish land.
02.18 – 02.28 The border patrols had two purposes. First, to show the people of Kobane that others are supporting them in their resistance.
02.29 – 02.35 Second, to narrow the movements of ISIS in Turkey. [Turkish] Soldiers blockaded the villages in which people were border guarding.
02.36 – 02.46 Every time the [Turkish] soldiers tried to force people to leave the [border] villages [which were located literally right beside ISIS held areas]. ISIS attacks gained enormous strength, immediately after.
02.47 – 02.50 Without exception, this happened each and every time.

Interview with Figen Yaşar-Mayor of Mus Bulanik from HDP
02.52 – 02.56 We initially came here during the beginning of the resistance in Kobane.
02.57 – 03.02 We first watched the border for seven days, during the peak of the clashes.
03.03 – 03.07 After, we went back to Muş and Bulanık, where we came.
03.09 – 03.16 During our second shift [on the border] we stayed here for nine days. Those days the clashes were really severe.
03.17 – 03.23 From Kobane to the air, smoke and fire clouds were raising.
03.24 – 03.30 We brought 12-13 martyr bodies to our village alone.
03.31 – 03.37 They were all the children of this land. Some of them joined to the war three months ago, some five months, and some six years.
03.39 – 03.46 Kobane has been cleansed [of ISIS fighters], but there are hundreds of villages connected to the Kobane [which ISIS controls].
03.47 – 04.02 Until the villages of Kobane are liberated, until the people of Kobane go back their homes and settle there, the people of Kurdistan and Turkey will guard and keep guarding.

Interview with Head of the security in the Village-(Name withheld)
04.07 – 04.13 I am responsible for the security of this district. I have been here for 95 days.
04.13 – 04.19 We explain to the border guards how to prevent ISIS from crossing.
04.20 – 04.23 Usually they cross from this district.
04.25 – 04.29 The ones who want to participate can easily cross the border.
04.30 – 04.36 As you see, that's the border for the guards. Between 6 pm and 6 am people [civilians] keep guarding.
04.38 – 04.42 There are other check points in other villages.
04.43 – 04.50 When they see them [refugees] from the distance, they inform us and we help them through.
04.54 – 04.57 The border guards notices us.
05.03 – 05.04 “hello” “hello”
05.10 – 05.11 Are taking over the shift?
05.11 – 05.12 Yes, two people in each shift.
05.19 – 05.20 Thank you.

05.28 – 05.29 We keep guard here, we can't leave.
05.29 – 05.31 We came for the shift change. You can leave now.

Filiz Aydın - Volunteer Watch Guard
05.34 – 05.42 We began guarding when ISIS come to Kobane. Not only in this village, but also in others.
05.43 – 05.55 The reason I keep guard is to prevent ISIS soldiers crossing the border. I also lost my brother at the war.
05.56 – 05.58 Not in Kobane, but in Rojava, in Serikani, I lost my brother.
05.59 – 06.04 My brother might be still alive if we watched the borders in Serikani.
06.06 – 06.14 It was his cause, and if we have the same cause, if we want his dreams to come true, we can also contribute.
06.15 – 06.25 Not everyone can get involved in armed battles in the mountains. Not everyone can fight in Kobane, but you can do whatever your hands find to do.
06.27 – 06.32 We say Kobane got liberated, but some of the villages are still under the siege.
06.33 – 06.39 Even if Kobane is cleansed [of ISIS], it's not just Kobane. Until Rojava gets liberated...
06.41 – 06.47 As I said it's not only about ISIS, it was first Al-Nusrah, Al-Qaida, and now ISIS.
06.48 – 06.54 There is Qamishle, Afrin... Until Rojava is completely cleansed,
06.55 – 07.05 Until the canton's [Rojava] political autonomy is recognized by the world, this is my opinion, the threat won't be defeated.

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Peshmerga Units Clear Explosives Laid...
Kirkuk, Makhmour
By Jeffry Ruigendijk
08 Feb 2015

The amount of IEDs left by the Islamic State is staggering. 'Not normal', says the mayor of Makhmour. According to Kurdish government and Peshmerga officials, improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and mines planted by Islamic State militants are the biggest cause of casualties for Peshmerga forces. ISIS has adopted the tactic of heavily seeding all of the territory it withdraws from with the deadly devices, with the intent of slowing down Peshmerga advances. Some IEDs are also intentionally left in fields and homes to target civilians according to Kurdish officials. We go to the frontlines with a Peshmerga engineer team specialized in dismantling the devices, and speak to a farmer who is affected by Islamic State IEDs. The mayor of the city of Makhmour, whose community is still dealing with getting rid of massive amounts of IEDs ISIS left in August, also weighs in on the subject.

Frame 0004
Defiant People of Kobane Return to De...
Kobane
By Bedir
06 Feb 2015

Kobane , Syria
February 6, 2015

Large numbers of Kurdish refugees returned from the Turkish city of Suruc to their hometown of Kobane .
ISIS withdrew from the city in late January under the weight of attacks from Kurdish fighters and airstrikes by international coalition.
Video shows refugees queuing to enter Kobane through a border crossing and walking amid the rubble and others cheering for Kurdish fighters.

Two interviewed returning refugees said that they are determined to stay in Kobane and that they are not scared of ISIS. Video also shows large-scale destruction in the city.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Wide of family walking amid destroyed buildings
Wide of boy carrying large bag
Various of refugees queuing to enter Kobane

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Woman) Unnamed refugee returning to Kobane
01:33 – 02:24
God willing, we shall achieve victory. We could no longer bear living in the tents, so we returned to Kobane because it is our land. We will never abandon Kobane because it is our honor. We will live amid this destruction. We will set up tents and live in Kobane . We are not afraid of ISIS. We used to be scared of it before, but now, we are not scared of anyone. Whoever wants to come, let them come. We are not scared of ISIS or anyone else.”
Various of refugees queueing at border crossing
Wide of refugees standing next to fighter
Wide of refugees walking through into Kobane
Wide of fighters

SOUNDBITE (Kurdish, Man) Unnamed refugees returning to Kobane
03:50 – 04:25

“I am from Kobane , and now I return to my city. I am returning to my land and hometown. Long live the YPG [Kurdish People’s Protection Units]. Long live the leader Abdullah Ocalan. Kobane has overcome terrorism. I am not scared. I am now returning to Kobane , the city of resistance.”

Various of people in pickup trucks cheering for Kurdish fighters
Wide of destroyed house and car
Wide of destroyed homes

Frame 0004
Refugee Syrian Christian Family Hope ...
Fanar,Lebanon
By Rachel K
05 Feb 2015

Fanar, Lebanon

February 5, 2015

After fleeing ISIS in northeastern Syria, a Syrian christian family has found refuge in a predominantly christian town in Lebanon. Despite feeling welcome in the town they have settled in, poverty and hopelessness remain. As a return to Syria seems impossible, Sonia, her mother Doros, and her pregnant sister-in-law Rita hope to emigrate to Australia with help of the United Nations.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Sonia Ishaya, Syrian Christian Refugee in Lebanon
00:00 – 03:15
We arrived here in September – September 1 – we have relatives here who come from Hassaka. My cousin and my niece rented this house for us. The United Nations have helped us. My father, mother and I were given a Visa card from the United Nations [we also receive aid from] churches. The UN gave a visa a card for the three of us only.
My brother works. Life is expensive. We can barely cover the rent. Only my brother works. I am handicapped, and my father and mother are old. My nephews are very young.
I had a psychological illness due to fear. I saw a psychiatrist and received treatment and medication in order to be able to talk and move around. Fear controlled to a large extent. Bombing hit our neighbourhood. The day ISIS went in, we left the area.
There was fear of everything. There nothing specific that I could relate my fear to. I was scared of everything. I was not scared of ISIS, I was terrorised.
The situation is difficult. I cannot handle the sight of blood or the sound of bullets. I have a complex of that.
If the situation remained as is, you will not find any more Christians. You will not find Christians in this region, especially if ISIS took control in this area. About three quarters of the [Christians] in Hassaka have left.
Here the situation is normal. We go to church and we can pray, however, one is called a refugee. One feels that he is not in his country.
We had a comfortable life and were happy in our country. We had jobs. What can I say?
Interviewer: Have you lost hope?
- Honestly, yes.

I always pray and ask God to give restore peace to Syria and all countries, and that children live happily again and families reunite. I wish that God does not deprive anyone of their country or family. Recently, my father was sick but we could not take him to the hospital because we cannot afford it. He was dying between our hands but we could not take him to the hospital. We could not even get the doctor.
SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Doros Khoshaba, Syrian Christian Refugee in Lebanon
03:16 – 05:40
“We had a house that we left. My daughter’s cousins and my granddaughter each gave us something for the house. But there is not any aid or money. We do not have anyone to help us. Thank God for your and our safety. I fled and I did not want to take anything with me. We were able to take these children. Artillery shells were falling on our house. We stayed for a week hiding in the bathroom. Shells were falling from every direction. I will not return. My son will not return either because all of the things that we have seen. I do not care about our house or belongings. There was not any water or bread and we were not able to leave the house.
If I can work and receive aid from churches I will not return. This is our country. We have seen Christians and churches. The situation here is different. Back there, my daughter was threatened twice. Two fighters killed a man in front of my house and dragged him. I was coming out and I saw him being shot in the head.
I want to go to Australia. We have applied to UN. If we are accepted we will go. If not, we will stay here. I would rather work at people’s homes than return. I am an old woman, but I am willing to work instead of returning. My eyes have seen so much.
Due to our fear, we forgot our prayers and ourselves. We saw terrorists… we were not able to know anything. We forgot everything, as if we were hit on the head.
May the Virgin Mary protect us and everyone else, not only us – all the people who fled Syria and came here. Virgin Mary, protect us and give us our daily bread and mercy. That is all I can say.
SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman), Rita Garabetian, Syrian Christian Refugee in Lebanon 05:41 –
The situation than it used to be in Syria. We are not scared like we used to be in Syria. However, we feel forlorn. People have received so well and no one has harmed us, but we feel like strangers. What bothers me the most is that my children do not go to school. I see other children going to school while my children stay at home. My husband is working, but we can barely cover our expenses, but we thank God.
Since I cannot enrol my children at school, the thing I can think of is traveling. This is our only ambition. Most people have come here to travel.
I am pregnant and I will give birth next month. I worry about the hospital bill, the cost of medications. I have a hundred things to worry about.
Honestly, we have not lived with the Lebanese before. In this area, Sid al-Boushriya, all the people are Assyrians from Hasaka. We have lived with any Lebanese. Yesterday, Lebanese people visited us. They were very decent and kind.
I do not think there any who live in tents. I am talking about the Christians of Hasaka. They are used to a different way of living. It is impossible for them to live in tents.
Hope of what?
Interviewer: To return.
To Syria, it is impossible. It is impossible to have peace in Syria before 10 or 15 years. There has not been an Arab country that was destroyed and then restored.
Christians remained in Lebanon because they were among each other. In Syria, ISIS meddled in the middle.
We saw what ISIS has done in Mossul, Iraq. What they did to the Christians and Yezidis. How many Christians are there in Hasaka? Their numbers are quite high, but ISIS could kill of them in a matter of a few days. There were about 20 Assyrian villages in which nobody remained. In each village, maybe one or two families remained. These villages were full; they had about 150 or 200 Christian families each. Now they are gone. They were all displaced. They went to Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan. They were displaced. They left their belongings, d houses and land. They had very good financial situation. They left everything and went away, out fear that their children would be killed. ISIS has no religion.
We were scared that what happened to them would happen to us.
-Who is ‘them’? - The Christians in Mossul. It was a disaster.

My cross… I do not walk without it. It protects me, even though it is small.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy), Unnamed, Rita Garabetian’s Son

08:46 -
I want to go to school. I want to stay here because I have friends, with whom I play. I have do not have anyone in Syria.

Interviewer: Why?

Because they were displaced and came here.

Interviewer: What is your dream?
I want to grow up and stay in Australia, and that the people of my country live in peace. Whenever I can, I would return to Syria.

Schools in Syria closed and there was war. I was scared of bombings and gunshots. I was scared of ISIS. ISIS displaced us.

Interviewer: Did you see or hear them?

  • I used to hear and see them. Interviewer: What did you see?
  • I saw shells falling. I also heard continuous gunshots. Bombs would fall and make a sound, boom! I wish that Jesus Christ protects Syria and its people, as well as all the countries; to protect every Christian and anyone else; and to protect all people in refugee camps.
    Lebanon is very beautiful.
    Interviewer: More beautiful than Syria?
  • No Syria is more beautiful.
  • Interviewer: Why?
  • I was living happily in Syria. I am happy in Lebanon because I saw my friends. I love to go to school.

-Interviewer: Why? - I want to learn and play with my friends. -Interviewer: What do you want to do when you grow up? -I want to be a doctor.

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Mass Grave discovered in Iraq - Nineveh
Nineveh
By rsoufi
05 Feb 2015

Forensics and legal personnel inspect a mass grave of bodies, allegedly Yazidis killed by ISIS, in the area of Nineveh, Iraq, on February 8, 2015. They are working in coordination with international human rights organizations (such as ICMP and the UN) with the aim of documenting and proving that the radical group, known as ISIS, is guilty of committing genocide.

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Mass Grave discovered in Iraq - Nineveh
Nineveh
By rsoufi
05 Feb 2015

Forensics and legal personnel inspect a mass grave of bodies, allegedly Yazidis killed by ISIS, in the area of Nineveh, Iraq, on February 8, 2015. They are working in coordination with international human rights organizations (such as ICMP and the UN) with the aim of documenting and proving that the radical group, known as ISIS, is guilty of committing genocide.

Thumb sm
Mass Grave discovered in Iraq - Nineveh
Nineveh
By rsoufi
05 Feb 2015

Forensics and legal personnel inspect a mass grave of bodies, allegedly Yazidis killed by ISIS, in the area of Nineveh, Iraq, on February 8, 2015. They are working in coordination with international human rights organizations (such as ICMP and the UN) with the aim of documenting and proving that the radical group, known as ISIS, is guilty of committing genocide.

Thumb sm
Mass Grave discovered in Iraq - Nineveh
Nineveh
By rsoufi
05 Feb 2015

Forensics and legal personnel inspect a mass grave of bodies, allegedly Yazidis killed by ISIS, in the area of Nineveh, Iraq, on February 8, 2015. They are working in coordination with international human rights organizations (such as ICMP and the UN) with the aim of documenting and proving that the radical group, known as ISIS, is guilty of committing genocide.

Thumb sm
Mass Grave discovered in Iraq - Nineveh
Nineveh
By rsoufi
05 Feb 2015

Forensics and legal personnel inspect a mass grave of bodies, allegedly Yazidis killed by ISIS, in the area of Nineveh, Iraq, on February 8, 2015. They are working in coordination with international human rights organizations (such as ICMP and the UN) with the aim of documenting and proving that the radical group, known as ISIS, is guilty of committing genocide.

Thumb sm
Mass Grave discovered in Iraq - Nineveh
Nineveh
By rsoufi
05 Feb 2015

Forensics and legal personnel inspect a mass grave of bodies, allegedly Yazidis killed by ISIS, in the area of Nineveh, Iraq, on February 8, 2015. They are working in coordination with international human rights organizations (such as ICMP and the UN) with the aim of documenting and proving that the radical group, known as ISIS, is guilty of committing genocide.

Thumb sm
Mass Grave discovered in Iraq - Nineveh
Nineveh
By rsoufi
05 Feb 2015

Forensics and legal personnel inspect a mass grave of bodies, allegedly Yazidis killed by ISIS, in the area of Nineveh, Iraq, on February 8, 2015. They are working in coordination with international human rights organizations (such as ICMP and the UN) with the aim of documenting and proving that the radical group, known as ISIS, is guilty of committing genocide.