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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (1 0f...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Fourteen year old boy, who works in selling Al Qat with his Father, Ahmad Issa.
He left school early in order to work with his father, because of the bad economical situation they have.
He stores Al Qat with the consent of his father.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (26 0...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Ahmad Issa, Qat seller.
whom his son left the school to work with him in selling Al Qat

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (11 0...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Ten year old boy works in selling Al Qat, to help his family.
He emptied his mouth before taking the photo.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (19 0...
Bajil, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Ten year old Yemeni boy, storing qat at the streets.
He doesn't go to school.
Al Qat sellers give him some everyday for free.
His name is Ali.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (24 0...
Bajil, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Ten year old Yemeni boy, storing qat at the streets.
He doesn't go to school.
Al Qat sellers give him some everyday for free.
His name is Ali.

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"BE A MAN" CAMPAIGN - Editor's Picks ...
Cairo, Egypt
By Editor's Picks
08 Nov 2012

Sexual Harassment is on the rise in Egypt and has been a growing issue since several young women were assaulted and stripped of their clothing by a mob in downtown Cairo in 2006.

According to a survey issued by the Egyptian Center for Women's Rights in 2008, 83% of Egyptian women and 98% of foreign women have experienced sexual harassment at least once.

Shirin Badr, a marketing manager at a design company, is working on a campaign called "Be a Man," which she started after documenting incidences of harassment on the metro with her mobile phone and posting them on the internet. The campaign works to educate the Egyptian public and support women's rights.

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Stop The Rise Of Sexual Harassment
Cairo, Egypt
By Transterra Egypt
06 Nov 2012

Sexual harassment has been dramatically on the rise in Egypt. It peaks during public holidays.

2006 marked the most horrific incident of harassment when several girls were brutally harassed and stripped of their clothes by a mob during Eid El-Fitr celebrations in downtown Cairo. The event played a major role in bringing the issue of harassment in Egypt to light.

According to a survey issued in 2008 by the Egyptian Centre for Women's Rights, 83 per cent of women in Egypt and 98 percent of foreign women have been exposed to sexual harassment at least once.

The complaints office at the National Council for Women has set up the hotline number 08-008-883-888 for receiving complaints about harassment during Eid al-Adha.

A group of Egyptian's pages on Facebook express a mission for monitoring sexual harassment in the Metro, by sharing women's experiences with sexual harassment through photos and videos.

*Interview Transcription:

My name is Shirin Badr, an Egyptian girl, and I work as the marketing manager at "Old Design" company. I also participated in "Yalla 3elm" website for long-distance education. Now I'm working on a campaign called "Be a Man."

"Be a Man" started when I was facing problems at the Metro station. I started taking the women's compartment, but of course there was no security so we had men in the compartment as well. So I started filming the compartment and broadcast the videos on Facebook and Twitter. The campaign was very effective. Once I got a call from a man telling me that I exposed his brother, and that he is afraid of going out and that he shaved his hair. The man was very supportive toward me and he told me that he is glad of what I did to his brother.

The next step was that I tried to get a man out of the compartment, but he refused so I started recording, using my cell phone camera. The result was that he hit me and the women in the compartment asked me to shut my mouth. I tried to stop the Metro and take him to the police, while women at the Metro helped him to run away.

From there, "Be a Man" started and more people wanted to participate in the campaign. As a team we started putting stickers in the women's compartments with the slogans, "Women's compartment, be aware of theft."
This was all in vain...the security officers were embarrassed so they started to check the Metro compartments for an hour or two in one or two stations, but what about the rest of the day? What about the other stations?

Besides the campaign we started to work on another issue, sexual harassment. We began to go down to the street and talk to people about sexual harassment and its causes, cooperating with other movements who also work on the same issue.

Recently we decided to sue both the Interior and the Transportation Minsters for the violations in the Metro. So we contacted some of the Metro employees who have papers that confirm the security breaches in the Metro, but they're absolutely afraid of talking about it because they tried to complain four times, and their complaints were neglected.

For everybody who wants to participate with us in this campaign, they can contact the lawyer Muhammad Othman Ahmad Othman, and he will work according to people complaints.

I am glad for what we've reached. Now I see a girl in the Metro asking men to get out of women's compartment, and some women said that they don't want to get in the women's compartment because of women recording men in the compartment. The negativity is infectious and the positivity as well. We need this infection.
Because the lack of security causes sexual harassment and theft, and this is not civilized at all.
When the Metro was invested in by a French company it was clean, well organized, and always on time. Now if you see a security man he will be smoking a cigarette in the compartment.

A friend of mine was in the Metro and there was a security officer and a man in the women's compartment. She tried to get the man out of the compartment, but the security officer hit her, dragged her, and kicked her. This is a disaster!

As for the sexual harassment, there are many reasons, but some people say that it's because of what girls wear. How about Saudi Arabia, the country with the third highest number of sexual harassment incidents, where women are all veiled and decent?
They blame the victim and give the criminal tens of excuses.
The last major incident was in Assiut with Sahar, the girl who got shot because she refused to be sexually harassed.
Our law is old, and a sexual predator forces girls to be armed. Two weeks ago a boy harassed a girl, and she took a knife out of her purse and cut him. This is a disaster. People should do something and girls should talk.
We should educate our sons that these girls are your sisters, and you have to protect them.

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Trial of defendants in NGO foreign fu...
Cairo Criminal Court, Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
04 Nov 2012

Cairo criminal court adjourned on Saturday, November 3, the trial of 43 foreign and Egyptian NGO workers to the session of December 2.

The defendants are accused of illegally receiving foreign funds and operating in Egypt without permission from the authorities.

Among the accused are 19 American citizens, 14 Egyptians and 10 other non-Egyptian nationals.

The delay is decided to allow the lawyers of the defendants to give their arguments before the court.

The court today heard the prosecution's representative who accused the defendants of defrauding the Egyptian people. He concluded his remarks by imploring the court to apply the harshest punishment on the accused.

Some Egyptian officials have linked the funding of civil society initiatives to a U.S. plot to undermine Egypt’s sovereignty while the United States and the civil society workers deny the accusations.

The defendants, including the son of the U.S. transportation secretary, are accused of receiving illegal funds from abroad and carrying out political activities unrelated to their civil society work.

The trial began earlier in February and resulted in an unusual confrontation between Cairo and Washington due to the involvement of a number of US organizations in the case.

Although the case is still going on, the American defendants departed Egypt on March 1, when the Supreme Council of the Armed Force (SCAF) was ruling the country.

Story: Trial of defendants in NGO foreign funding case adjourned to December 2

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: November 3, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: November 3, 2012
Length: 0:01:24
Video Size: 69.7 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST
1- Various external shot of Cairo Criminal Court headquarters in New Cairo
2- Zoom out shot of the judges at the court room
3- Zoom out shot of defendants inside the dock
4- Various shots of the court session
5- Pan right shot of the judges concluding the session and leaving
6- SOUNDBITE 1
7- SOUNDBITE 2
8- Wide shot of people leaving after the trial session
9- Various external shot of Cairo Criminal Court headquarters in New Cairo

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PUNK IS NOT DEAD - Editor's Picks Oct...
Banda Aceh, Jakarta, Indonesia
By Editor's Picks
30 Oct 2012

Young Indonesians living a punk lifestyle are being persecuted by the "Sharia Police" of the country. Many "punks" have recently been arrested in Banda Aceh, Indonesia's most devoutly Muslim province, purportedly to be re-educated. While human rights groups are concerned about the situation, the police say the goal is to protect the young ones from themselves and prevent them from bringing shame on their families.

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MINORITIES IN GEORGIA - Editor's Pick...
Georgia
By Editor's Picks
23 Oct 2012

Many Georgian civilians were deported or fled their homes during the past century's conflicts and found refuge in other parts of the country or neighboring Central Asian countries. While some managed to start a new life, the majority of internally displaced people still struggle with housing and unemployment issues. In Tbilisi and other regions of Georgia, thousands of displaced families are claiming ownership rights to buildings they have occupied since the conflicts. In other cases families are returning to villages from where their parents were deported decades ago and face integrating into new communities.

Roma are one of the most stigmatized minorities of Georgia, associated with street vendors, beggars and in many cases thought of as thieves and swindlers.

Villagers cut meat for the Eid al Adha festival near the mosque in Talaveri village, populated mostly by ethnic Azerbaijanis.

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, 54, an immigrant from Nigeria drives through Tbilisi streets. He arrived in Tbilisi in 1995, got married to a Georgian woman, and now owns a mixed goods store. He says back when he just arrived in Georgia, there were "only 3-4 black people [in Tbilisi]." He says that during the last fifteen years the situation with tolerance has changed significantly, Georgians "got used to the foreigners," and it became safer to go to the street after dark.

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, 54, an immigrant from Nigeria by his store in Tbilisi. He arrived in Tbilisi in 1995, got married to a Georgian woman, and now owns a mixed goods store. He says back when he just arrived in Georgia, there were "only 3-4 black people [in Tbilisi]." He says that during the last fifteen years the situation with tolerance has changed significantly, Georgians "got used to the foreigners," and it became safer to go to the street after dark.

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, 54, an immigrant from Nigeria by his store in Tbilisi. He arrived in Tbilisi in 1995, got married to a Georgian woman, and now owns a mixed goods store. He says back when he just arrived in Georgia, there were "only 3-4 black people [in Tbilisi]." He says that during the last fifteen years the situation with tolerance has changed significantly, Georgians "got used to the foreigners," and it became safer to go to the street after dark.

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, 54, an immigrant from Nigeria by his store in Tbilisi. He arrived in Tbilisi in 1995, got married to a Georgian woman, and now owns a mixed goods store. He says back when he just arrived in Georgia, there were "only 3-4 black people [in Tbilisi]." He says that during the last fifteen years the situation with tolerance has changed significantly, Georgians "got used to the foreigners," and it became safer to go to the street after dark.

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, 54, an immigrant from Nigeria by his store in Tbilisi. He arrived in Tbilisi in 1995, got married to a Georgian woman, and now owns a mixed goods store. He says back when he just arrived in Georgia, there were "only 3-4 black people [in Tbilisi]." He says that during the last fifteen years the situation with tolerance has changed significantly, Georgians "got used to the foreigners," and it became safer to go to the street after dark.

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, 54, an immigrant from Nigeria by his store in Tbilisi. He arrived in Tbilisi in 1995, got married to a Georgian woman, and now owns a mixed goods store. He says back when he just arrived in Georgia, there were "only 3-4 black people [in Tbilisi]." He says that during the last fifteen years the situation with tolerance has changed significantly, Georgians "got used to the foreigners," and it became safer to go to the street after dark.

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, 54, an immigrant from Nigeria inside his store in Tbilisi. He arrived in Tbilisi in 1995, got married to a Georgian woman, and now owns a mixed goods store. He says back when he just arrived in Georgia, there were "only 3-4 black people [in Tbilisi]." He says that during the last fifteen years the situation with tolerance has changed significantly, Georgians "got used to the foreigners," and it became safer to go to the street after dark.

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, a 54-year-old immigrant from Nigeria, is watching Lia Lemonjava, a hairdresser sharing the same store, perforate a local girl's ears for her first earrings. Lemonjava, who has been working with Nelson for the last six years, says that his a very honest and reliable person. But best of all, she says, is that "he loves Georgians."

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, a 54-year-old immigrant from Nigeria, is watching Lia Lemonjava, a hairdresser sharing the same store, perforate a local girl's ears for her first earrings. Lemonjava, who has been working with Nelson for the last six years, says that his a very honest and reliable person. But best of all, she says, is that "he loves Georgians."

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, a 54-year-old immigrant from Nigeria, is watching Lia Lemonjava, a hairdresser sharing the same store, perforate a local girl's ears for her first earrings. Lemonjava, who has been working with Nelson for the last six years, says that his a very honest and reliable person. But best of all, she says, is that "he loves Georgians."

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A Nigerian in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, Georgia
By TemoBardzimashvili
19 Oct 2012

Erunz Nelson, a 54-year-old immigrant from Nigeria, is watching Lia Lemonjava, a hairdresser sharing the same store, perforate a local girl's ears for her first earrings. Lemonjava, who has been working with Nelson for the last six years, says that his a very honest and reliable person. But best of all, she says, is that "he loves Georgians."

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#GlobalNoise, Barcelona (10 of 10)
Plaza de Catalonia, Barcelona, Spain
By Francesc Xavier Subias Salvo
13 Oct 2012

Barcelona, Spain - Noisemaking protest against payment of public debt.
Thousands of "outraged" people responded to the call of the 13-O #Globalnoise rally in Barcelona Saturday, driven by the 15-M Occupy Wall Street movement. The protest, of which several were held simultaneously in over 30 countries and hundreds of cities around the world, were staged to voice rejection of payment of public debt, which is said to be "illegitimate and only benefits the finical powers." The protest started in the Plaza de Catalonia with demonstrators banging pots and pans to make noise, and continued through the streets of Barcelona, under the slogan, "We must not, do not pay."

Protesta y cacerolada global contra el pago de la deuda pública.
Miles de personas 'indignadas' se suman a la convocatoria del 13-O en Barcelona.
Barcelona, España - Miles de personas han participado este sábado por la tarde el centro de Barcelona a la protesta global 13-O # Globalnoise, impulsada por el movimiento de indignados del 15-M y Ocupamos Wall Street. La convocatoria, simultánea en más de 30 países y en cientos de ciudades de todo el mundo para mostrar el rechazo al pago de la deuda pública "ilegítima y que sólo beneficia al poder financiero": Se ha iniciado la protesta con una cacerolada en la plaza de Catalunya y a continuacion se han manifestado por las calles de Barcelona bajo el lema “No debemos, no pagamos”.

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FEATURING INDIA; CONTEMPORARY EGYPTIA...
Asia
By Editor's Picks
05 Oct 2012

Kashmir Valley celebrates tourism week with the mesmerizing Shikara festival held at the world famous Lake Dal. Hundreds of boaters took part by giving tours on the lake where the tourism department gave live performances of traditional Kashmiri songs.

Based in the Chitrkoot district of Utter Pradesh, one of the most underdeveloped places in India, a creative small-town tribal woman named Meera launched a local paper "Khabar Laheriya" (Wave News) which began as a way for women to address sexual violence, gender issues and education.

Voodoo Doll: An interpretive dance piece performed at Contemporary Dance Night in Egypt.

Thousands of Jordanians gathered in front of Al Husseini Mosque in downtown Amman to call for electoral reform after Friday prayer on October 5, 2012.

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Egyptian Activists Establish “Egyptia...
Cairo, Egypt
By U.S. Editor
03 Oct 2012

Egyptian political activists, legal experts, NGO members and human rights activists held a press conference on Wednesday, October 3, to announce the formation of the “Egyptian Constitutional Front”, which they consider as a new constitution-writing panel to draw a new representative constitution.

They expressed rejection to the current Islamist-dominated constitution-writing panel, which they expect will not fully tackle human rights issues, aiming to place the goals of the revolution in the new constitution.

According to founding members, the Egyptian Constitutional Front aims to draft a democratic constitution based on the principles of citizenship and respect of human rights.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Hafez Abou Seada, Chairman of the Egyptian Organization for Human Rights (EOHR):
“Constitutions are established through agreement even if there is a minority of 10%. They should feel that they are partners of making the new constitution. The big mistake and catastrophe was that the constitution-writing panel was subjected to the majority. The majority is changeable and the constitution governs all Egyptians. Therefore, I believe that the wise people inside the Islamic trend have to return once again to Egyptian national unity.”

They also highlighted the importance of entrenching certain rights into Egypt’s new constitution, including freedom of the press, the right to peaceful protest, and a wide range of economic and social rights.

The attendees expressed rejection of giving the authority to form the constitution panel to the President again in case of the dissolution of the current panel.

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – George Ishaaq, political activist and founder of Kefaya Movement:
“We should be careful when we offer the new draft constitution and discuss it with the people. It is Egypt’s post-revolution constitution, so it has to be completely different than that of pre-revolution Egypt.” The current panel was elected by the members of the People's Assembly (the lower house of the parliament) and the Shura Council (the upper house of the parliament) before the dissolution of the People's Assembly.

The panel still faces the risk of dissolution by court order on the grounds that it was drawn up by the dissolved lower house of parliament.

Egypt's Supreme Administrative Court is expected to rule on the constitutionality of the panel on October 9.

Founders of the Egyptian Constitutional Front include former MP Amr Hamzawy, editor in chief of Al Alam Al Youm Newspaper Saad Hagras, board member of Al Wafd Political Party Essam Sheha, and member of the journalist Syndicate Gamal Fahmy.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 3, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 3, 2012
Length: 0:02:07
Video Size: 104 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Wide shot of the press conference, the attendees at the conference hall
2- Various shots of the conference, speakers and the attendees
3- Medium shot of one of the attendees speaking during the conference
4- Medium shot of cameramen filming during the conference
5- Medium shot of Hafez Abou Seada, Chairman of the Egyptian Organization for Human Rights (EOHR) speaking during the conference
6- Wide shot of the attendees at the conference hall
7- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Hafez Abou Seada, Chairman of the Egyptian Organization for Human Rights (EOHR):
“Constitutions are established through agreement even if there is a minority of 10%. They should feel that they are partners of making the new constitution. The big mistake and catastrophe was that the constitution-writing panel was subjected to the majority. The majority is changeable and the constitution governs all Egyptians. Therefore, I believe that the wise people inside the Islamic trend have to return nonce again to Egyptian, national unity.” 8- Various shot of the conference, speakers and the attendees
9- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – George Ishaaq, political activist and founder of Kefaya Movement:
“We should be careful when we offer the new draft constitution and discuss it with the people. It is Egypt’s post-revolution constitution, so it has to be completely different than that of pre-revolution Egypt.”
10- Various shot of the conference, speakers and the attendees

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Ambrosetti Forum, Villa D'Este, Cerno...
Cernobbio, Italy
By Editor's Picks
09 Sep 2012

Photos and video taken at the annual European House Ambrosetti Forum at Villa D'Este, Cernobbio, Italy, over the weekend of September 7-9, 2012. The forum is an annual economic conference where heads of state, ministers, Nobel laureates and businessmen gather to discuss current and future economic challenges, scientific, technological and geo-political developments that impact business and society.

Among the attendees were Joaquim Alumnia, EU Commissioner for free-market policies, the President of Israel Shimon Perez, Romano Prodi, former Italian Prime Minister and former President of the European Commission, Giulio Tremonti and Renato Brunetta of the Italian Parliament, economics professor at Stern Business School and Chairman of Roubini Global Economics Nouriel Roubini, Herman Van Rompuy, President of the European Council and Mario Monti, Italian Prime Minister, among politicians, businessmen, and economics experts worldwide.

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Monti and Van Rompuy
Cernobbio, Italy
By francocavalleri
08 Sep 2012

Mario Monti, Prime Minister of Italy, and Herman van Rompuy, President of the EU Council, shake hands after their announcement for an EU-wide meeting on resurgent anti-Eu feeling in Rome next year

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Al Wefaq National Islamic Society, Ba...
Manama, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
04 Sep 2012

4 September 2012
Stock Footage of Al Wefaq National Islamic Society Headquarters in Bahrain.

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Liberia, NEC Destroys 2011 Elections
Monrovia, Liberia
By Anthony Daniels
21 Aug 2012

The National Elections Commission (NEC) will today August 21, 2012, commence the destruction of Ballot papers for the 2011 National Referendum and the 2011 presidential and Legislative Elections at all NEC's magisterial offices across Liberia.

The destruction of the ballot papers and other election related material is in keeping with Chapter 4 Section 4.16 of the 1986 New Election Law of Liberia.

The Acting Chairman of the NEC, Cllr. Elizabeth J. Nelson, will head a team of members of the Board of Commissioners and a team of NEC Staff to NEC Magisterial Office in Brewerville where an occasion marking the symbolic destruction of the electronics materials will be held.

Similarly, destruction of elections materials will be held simultaneously across the country at all NEC magisterial offices.

Meanwhile, the Commission is inviting all registered political parties, government officials, civil society organizations, international and local partners, the media and the public to attend the occasion which begin at 10:a.m., August 21, 2012.

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NuJiang (5 of 7)
Nujiang, Yunnan, China
By Teo Butturini
03 Aug 2012

A group of people from the Lisu minority gathering at a small settlement along the road of the NuJiang Valley, as seen from the window of a mini-bus.

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Saisei - Recovery (12 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Aug 2012

Taka wearing life jacket for his hoby, canoeing stands alone in a shore. Tokyo, Japan. Sep. 2012

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Qalandia Checkpoint
Ramallah
By Elo B
28 Jul 2012

Hands appear between fences. Palestinians wait to cross Qalandia checkpoint, the main checkpoint between Ramallah and Jerusalem

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Mr. Hadi Al Musawi Speaking at Al Wef...
Manama, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
18 Jul 2012

Manama, Bahrain | 18 July 2012

The Al Wefaq National Islamic Society held a press conference at the National Assembly headquarters on July 18, 2012 in the capital Manama. The head of Freedoms and Human Rights committee, Mr. Hadi Al Musawi, discussed the implementation and recommendations of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry, known locally as Bassiouni. He also addressed the arrest of activist Mohamed Zayani, the growing use of Twitter as a tool of expression and targeting arrests toward activists using social media platforms.

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Mr. Hadi Al Musawi Speaking at Al Wef...
Manama, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
18 Jul 2012

Manama, Bahrain | 18 July 2012

The Al Wefaq National Islamic Society held a press conference at the National Assembly headquarters on July 18, 2012 in the capital Manama. The head of Freedoms and Human Rights committee, Mr. Hadi Al Musawi, discussed the implementation and recommendations of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry, known locally as Bassiouni. He also addressed the arrest of activist Mohamed Zayani, the growing use of Twitter as a tool of expression and targeting arrests toward activists using social media platforms.

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Mr. Hadi Al Musawi Speaking at Al Wef...
Manama, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
18 Jul 2012

Manama, Bahrain | 18 July 2012

The Al Wefaq National Islamic Society held a press conference at the National Assembly headquarters on July 18, 2012 in the capital Manama. The head of Freedoms and Human Rights committee, Mr. Hadi Al Musawi, discussed the implementation and recommendations of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry, known locally as Bassiouni. He also addressed the arrest of activist Mohamed Zayani, the growing use of Twitter as a tool of expression and targeting arrests toward activists using social media platforms.

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Mr. Hadi Al Musawi Speaking at Al Wef...
Manama, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
18 Jul 2012

Manama, Bahrain | 18 July 2012

The Al Wefaq National Islamic Society held a press conference at the National Assembly headquarters on July 18, 2012 in the capital Manama. The head of Freedoms and Human Rights committee, Mr. Hadi Al Musawi, discussed the implementation and recommendations of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry, known locally as Bassiouni. He also addressed the arrest of activist Mohamed Zayani, the growing use of Twitter as a tool of expression and targeting arrests toward activists using social media platforms.

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Young People March Through Manama, Ba...
Manama, Bahrain
By Media Made by Bahraini People
18 Jul 2012

Manama, Bahrain | 18 July 2012

Young people march through the capital of Bahrain.

The Al Wefaq National Islamic Society held a press conference at the National Assembly headquarters on July 18, 2012 in the capital Manama. The head of Freedoms and Human Rights committee, Mr. Hadi Al Musawi, discussed the implementation and recommendations of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry, known locally as Bassiouni. He also addressed the arrest of activist Mohamed Zayani, the growing use of Twitter as a tool of expression and targeting arrests toward activists using social media platforms.

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Saisei - Recovery (23 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jul 2012

Taka has a dinner alone every night. He takes couple of pills to surpress the dejection of his mind since he attempted suicide. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2011