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Istanbul Fashion Week 2013 (19 of 53)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
13 Mar 2013

Attendees before the the Tuvanam show at Istanbul Fashion Week in Istanbul, Turkey.

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Istanbul Fashion Week 2013 (17 of 53)
Istanbul, Turkey
By Monique Jaques
13 Mar 2013

Attendees before the the Tuvanam show at Istanbul Fashion Week in Istanbul, Turkey.

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Syrian Refugee Children Work in Beiru...
Hamra, Beirut, Lebanon ,
By hussein baydoun
12 Mar 2013

Syrian refugee child, he is 7 years old and sells flowers on the streets all night.

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Syrian Refugee Children Work in Beiru...
Hamra, Beirut, Lebanon ,
By hussein baydoun
12 Mar 2013

A Syrian refugee selling flowers on the streets. His name is Zaalan and he is 14 years old.

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Bogwa: A ritual of Exhumation (17 of 21)
Ifugao, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
11 Mar 2013

Bogwa is celebrated for 3 days and everyday, the organizer of the festivity will butcher pig to feed the entire village.

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Saisei - Recovery (26 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Mar 2013

Taka makes preparation for going to his company. He wakes up early every morning because it takes about one hour by a train to go to his company from his home. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2011

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Saisei: Coming To Life
Tokyo, Japan
By U.S. Editor
28 Feb 2013

"Saisei" means to come to life again and to recover through time. In Japan, the annual number of suicides has exceeded 30,000. By prefecture, Tokyo had the most suicides, at 3,100. Furthermore, the annual number of people who attempted suicide is said to be the 10 times. This serious number can clearly represent the tough and difficult social life of Japan. However, this ridiculous number does not appeal any individuals’ struggles behind their real dramas. I am following two parsons who attempted suicide to tell their stories through their cases and look at the meaning of living in this society.

" I still wonder why I am alive here."

Taka Fukushima, 43 years old who quietly decided to kill himself three years ago because he had been suffered from depression and asthma due to stress of work for long time. Then, he hung himself with a thick rope which he had for his hobby, canoeing. As soon as he was found by his grand-father in his room, he was sent to the emergency hospital with his heart stopped beating. The doctor said he would be left with a severe after effect, although he might come arrive. After two weeks, everyone thought it was a miracle when he opened his eyes again and he even did not show much permanent damage. He spent a month in the hospital and took a break for a year. Luckily enough, he has found himself a job in the design industry and decided to return to the society. However, he said that it is not so easy to live again in this society for him because Japanese society tends to not accept people who dropped out even once. Now he is working hard without telling anyone his past of attempting suicide. He said, "I do my best a little more as it is. I feel that I was saved by invisible some kind of will, so I must live".

"I was saved by my child."

Emi Asai, 35 years old has been suffering from depression and panic disorder which caused by a stress of work when she was 21 years old. One day five years ago, she made up in a face neatly and changed into a dress she loved and wrote a will at her room, then she intended to die and took medicine more than 300 tablets. Fortunately, she was found by her husband and was done gastric irrigation immediately at a hospital and escaped death. One year after she leaving a hospital, she became pregnant and a baby has made her get hope to live again. She said, "I still has been suffering from mental disorder and sometime I can not control myself. If I has not been given a child, I would commit suicide again. As far as there is my child, I must live for her". Now she helps her husband's company and studies to get a license of psychology counselor.

In 2012, the number of suicide fell below 30,000 for the first time in 15 years. However it is still high number throughout the world. There are about 300,000 people who attempted suicide in Japan and they are struggling to live like them I have covered.

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MAASAI COMMUNITY, KISERIA
Kiserian, Kenya
By Mais Istanbuli
27 Feb 2013

Meeting with members of the Maasai community near Kiserian town, at Olooltepes Picnic site

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Island of Twins (21 of 23)
Alabat Island, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
03 Feb 2013

There are around 60 pairs of twins in a small town on Alabat Island. Eudosia and Antonia are the oldest twins living in the island turning 82 next year,w hile the five month-old babies, Jane and Joy, are the youngest twins on the island.
According to the mayor, the population of the island is composed of .4% of twins of the 12,039 residents of their town. When he and his wife migrated to the island in 1980s they were amazed that the island had so many twins. As a matter of fact, the former mayor of the island had a twin brother. Town folks are shocked when they think they've seen that the dead mayor is alive, but later learn that the former mayor has a twin brother.
No studies have been conducted on the island as to why the prevalence of twins in this small town is growing. According to a study conducted between 1996 to 2006, the Philippine Obstetric and Gynecologic Society found out that there was 182% increase in multiple pregnancies in 35 year-old women due to the use of fertility drugs. Due to the remoteness of the island and the limited access to fertility drugs, other influences could be considered such as inheritance of twinning or the food intake of mothers.
According to Wikipedia, Yoruba in South Africa has the highest rate of twinning in the world, with 45-50 twin sets (or 90-100 twins) per 1,000 live births, possibly because of high consumption of a specific type of yam containing a natural phytoestrogen which may stimulate the ovaries to release an egg from each side.
The main source of sustenance on the island is farming and fishing and according to the oldest midwife in the island, heredity is the major culprit of twinning in the island, and so far, their island has the highest population of twins in the entire Philippines.

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Island of Twins (15 of 23)
Alabat Island, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
03 Feb 2013

There are around 60 pairs of twins in a small town on Alabat Island. Eudosia and Antonia are the oldest twins living in the island turning 82 next year,w hile the five month-old babies, Jane and Joy, are the youngest twins on the island.
According to the mayor, the population of the island is composed of .4% of twins of the 12,039 residents of their town. When he and his wife migrated to the island in 1980s they were amazed that the island had so many twins. As a matter of fact, the former mayor of the island had a twin brother. Town folks are shocked when they think they've seen that the dead mayor is alive, but later learn that the former mayor has a twin brother.
No studies have been conducted on the island as to why the prevalence of twins in this small town is growing. According to a study conducted between 1996 to 2006, the Philippine Obstetric and Gynecologic Society found out that there was 182% increase in multiple pregnancies in 35 year-old women due to the use of fertility drugs. Due to the remoteness of the island and the limited access to fertility drugs, other influences could be considered such as inheritance of twinning or the food intake of mothers.
According to Wikipedia, Yoruba in South Africa has the highest rate of twinning in the world, with 45-50 twin sets (or 90-100 twins) per 1,000 live births, possibly because of high consumption of a specific type of yam containing a natural phytoestrogen which may stimulate the ovaries to release an egg from each side.
The main source of sustenance on the island is farming and fishing and according to the oldest midwife in the island, heredity is the major culprit of twinning in the island, and so far, their island has the highest population of twins in the entire Philippines.

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Island of Twins (16 of 23)
Alabat Island, Philippines
By Sherbien Dacalanio
03 Feb 2013

There are around 60 pairs of twins in a small town on Alabat Island. Eudosia and Antonia are the oldest twins living in the island turning 82 next year,w hile the five month-old babies, Jane and Joy, are the youngest twins on the island.
According to the mayor, the population of the island is composed of .4% of twins of the 12,039 residents of their town. When he and his wife migrated to the island in 1980s they were amazed that the island had so many twins. As a matter of fact, the former mayor of the island had a twin brother. Town folks are shocked when they think they've seen that the dead mayor is alive, but later learn that the former mayor has a twin brother.
No studies have been conducted on the island as to why the prevalence of twins in this small town is growing. According to a study conducted between 1996 to 2006, the Philippine Obstetric and Gynecologic Society found out that there was 182% increase in multiple pregnancies in 35 year-old women due to the use of fertility drugs. Due to the remoteness of the island and the limited access to fertility drugs, other influences could be considered such as inheritance of twinning or the food intake of mothers.
According to Wikipedia, Yoruba in South Africa has the highest rate of twinning in the world, with 45-50 twin sets (or 90-100 twins) per 1,000 live births, possibly because of high consumption of a specific type of yam containing a natural phytoestrogen which may stimulate the ovaries to release an egg from each side.
The main source of sustenance on the island is farming and fishing and according to the oldest midwife in the island, heredity is the major culprit of twinning in the island, and so far, their island has the highest population of twins in the entire Philippines.

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Ethiopian Women Living With Leprosy
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
By U.S. Editor
29 Jan 2013

Leprosy has been for many centuries, in Ethiopia, a sickness with enormous social implications. The physical consequences of catching such an illness has forced many infected by the disease into a solitary life or, at best, into leper’s colonies through out the country. With medicinal progress and campaigns to explain to locals that leprosy is not contagious amongst humans, some understanding of the illness has made headway in the country.
Such a change can be seen in the capital where an entire hospital was built, mostly with European money, to deal with this lingering sickness. The Alert hospital, as locals commonly name it, specializes in skin illnesses, and mostly with leprosy. Situated in the heart of a leper colony in Southern Addis Ababa where thousands of lepers live and raise their families. It treats thousands of people each year, locals often coming from far away in remote areas to get treatment. The hallways are usually loaded with dozens of families from the countryside, bringing sick family members, often after a long and tenuous travel. They wait for a day or two sometimes to see a specialized doctor. For the really ones, rooms are available almost free of cost, as foreign money keeps the institution afloat. The doctors, cladded in white are always available separating lepers from infectious diseases, putting the most sick in specially equipped rooms, which usually contains 6 to 8 beds. Operations, like amputation, a rather common affair, in the world of leprosy are always done inside the hospital by specially trained surgeon. The presence of the Alert hospital in the slum has changed the life of many lepers in Ethiopia, but foremost has saved thousands of lives living inside this ghetto where local official rarely venture. Constant danger, rampant poverty, and no sanitation has left thousands living inside this slum stranded outside Ethiopian society with no hope to climb the social ladder. The slum was created, like so many before it, to forget the leprosy problem, seen as an evil due to its quite graphic nature, scaring for life the unfortunates who contract the sickness. Inside the slum, women with leprosy cover themselves with a white sheet as to be recognized, covering their faces to stop starring or fear from healthy Ethiopians. But not all is bleak. A group of women with leprosy have gotten together to fight their condition. They created a small business where a dozen or so of these women knit and put together traditional garments and bed sheets. Using their bare hands and ancients machinery, these women have managed to organize a small business where they can earn a small salary from their sales. Kelebe, 60 years old, is one of these women. She arrived in the slum from the Northern part of the country to start over and perhaps find a better life after her husband died. She brought with her, her children, cousins, and other relatives, to increase their chances of survival. Once there, she was quickly reminded that her condition would not make things life easy for her and her family. She managed to find a shack made out of mud with metal roofing, and dirt floors. She, however did not give up, and joined these businesswomen. The fruit of her work has helped her to feed herself as well as her family members. In fact it has allowed her to prosper, buy new clothes and give some schooling to the youngest in her family. With an ongoing fix price of 50$ for the most expensive bedding, the little company has been able to sustain itself for a few years now, feeding a dozen family. However, this small grouping seem to be the exception to the rule. Most lepers in the slum keep starving; their offspring have no more future than their parents did before them, and the government seems uninterested in helping this portion of the population.

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General Burney MC
Kampala, Uganda
By Amy Hume
17 Dec 2012

Founding Father of End of the Weak Uganda. Burney MC believes that Hip Hop can change people in a positive way and put bread on the table.

Hip Hop is a global phenomena that reaches nearly all corners of the Earth. Starting in the projects of NYC nearly 40 years ago, struggling youth from Mongolia to Rwanda use music as a weapon to express their situations, hopes, and dreams. Though Hip Hop culture is new to Uganda, it is becoming popular with people of all ages, but with the youth in particular. Hip Hop music is reaching the smallest of villages, as I witnessed in the war-torn area of Gulu. Access to music is free, which is an essential aspect of why Hip Hop is spreading like wildfire.
In 2009, End of the Weak (EOW), a collaboration of MCs, graffiti artists, break dancers and DJs that spans 17 countries, reached Uganda. All chapters of EOW are involved with community outreach, workshops for youth and exude positive influence in their communities through Hip Hop culture. The MC Challenge is a competition in each country wherein the winners gather at the World Finals, which are held in a different country each year. The MC Challenge is held in the central, eastern, western and northern regions of Uganda so that many different languages are represented in the competition. Winners of the MC Challenge are provided studio time, video production and photo shoots as a way to share and promote their music.

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Veterans Protecting Protesters in Mai...
kiev,ukraine
By lordcob
14 Dec 2012

Alexander, 50, prepares himself for his team's night shift. He served throughout Syria with a small team of special forces bewteen 1983 and 1984. He arrived in Maidan after the violence of the police on November 30 to protect the people. Since he has children, he wants them to grow up in a democratic country. "I am awaiting changes since our independence in 1991," he says, "Yanukovich when he had finally the possibility of joning Europe, he showed his real face. Now he has to go."

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GROWING NUMBER OF YEMENI CHILDREN ADD...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By Editor's Picks
12 Dec 2012

In Yemen, Qat addictions have grown to epidemic proportions among children and young adults. The drug induces a similar high as that of caffeine, and can be highly addictive. The problem is such that many children stop going to school, instead choosing to stay home to chew the bitter plant with friends, or addicted family members. Officials are concerned about the growing problem, an fear that the plant is creating a generation of illiterate children.

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YEMENI CHILDREN ADDICTED TO QAT
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By Mais Istanbuli
11 Dec 2012

Qat, a plant found in the Arabian Peninsula that acts as a stimulant when chewed, has begun to have an effect on economic, health, and environmental issues. The World Health Organization ruled it a "drug of abuse" because it can cause a mild to moderate psychological dependence.

The plant is accused of 'destroying the future of Yemen,' in particular when children begin chewing it at an early age. Children between 8 and 15-years-old can become addicted to the stimulant, often with the consent of their parents or guardians. It's a common belief, advocated by fathers, that chewing qat is a sign of adulthood and wisdom, and thus it's practiced at weddings at funerals.

Some fathers give their children qat as in incentive to stay home and finish homework instead of staying out in the streets, but youth also chew it in secret with their friends, both in public and in their private residences.

The economic crisis in Yemen has pushed children to work, and some choose to plant qat or sell it, often resulting in a discontinuation of their formal education.

"One reason behind children's addiction to qat is the tendency to leave school and enter the qat industry. This is due to the bad situations their families are going through, so the parents are not completely in control," says Dr. Adel Al-Sharjabi, a professor of sociology at Sana'a University. "Some parents even travel outside of Yemen, leaving their children to make their own decisions. Another reason is the lack of education and common knowledge among both parents and the youth," adds Al-Sharbaji.

Along with affecting society, the drug also affects health, causing hypertension and what some call "emotional disturbances."

Mohammad Al-Qadsi, a civil servant, said, "I chew qat, but I don't want my son to do so because of the harm it inflicts. If I allow him he will lose his childhood and his studies."

The money spent on Qat is about 60 million Yemeni riyals, which equals 6.5 percent of the total GDP, excluding oil. According to the Yemeni government's five-year development plan, 24 percent of all employed workers are involved in the qat industry.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (14 0...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Thirteen year old boy, storing qat in the city of Al Hudaydah.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (15 0...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Thirteen year old boy,storing qat in the city of Al Hudaydah.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (25 0...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Ahmad Issa, Qat seller.
Whom his son left the school to work with him .

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (10 0...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Ten year old boy works in selling Al Qat, to help his family.
He emptied his mouth before taking the photo.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (7 0f...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Eleven Year old Yemeni boy storing Al Qat with adults in a wedding, with a bottle of water next to him.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (8 0f...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Eleven Year old Yemeni boy storing Qat with adults in a wedding, with a bottle of water next to him.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (9 0f...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Eleven Year old Yemeni boy storing Qat with adults in a wedding, with a bottle of water next to him.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (20 0...
Bajil, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Ten year old Yemeni boy, storing qat at the streets.
He doesn't go to school.
Al Qat sellers give him some everyday for free.
His name is Ali.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (21 0...
Bajil, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Ten year old Yemeni boy, storing qat at the streets.
He doesn't go to school.
Al Qat sellers give him some everyday for free.
His name is Ali.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (22 0...
Bajil, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Ten year old Yemeni boy, storing qat at the streets.
He doesn't go to school.
Al Qat sellers give him some everyday for free.
His name is Ali.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (23 0...
Bajil, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Ten year old Yemeni boy, storing qat at the streets.
He doesn't go to school.
Al Qat sellers give him some everyday for free.
His name is Ali.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (12 0...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

At a Yemeni wedding, in Al Hudaydah, which is Situated on the Red Sea.
He goes to school, and his father allows him to store Al-Qat only in the weddings.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (13 0...
Bajil, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

In the city of Bajil, a ten year old boy, storing qat at the street, he doesn't go to school.
Al Qat sellers give him some everyday.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (2 0f...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

In a Yemeni wedding, two twelve-year old boys storing Al Qat with their father, he allows them only in weddings.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (4 0f...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Eleven year old boy storing Al Qat with his friends in the city of Al Hudaydah, Yemen.

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Yemeni Children Addicted to Qat (6 0f...
Al Hudaydah, Yemen
By wail
10 Dec 2012

Eleven year old boy storing Al Qat with his friends in the city of Al Hudaydah, Yemen.