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Saisei - Recovery (25 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jun 2012

Taka prays at a shrine every morning before going to his company since he attempted suicide. Tokyo, Japan. Oct. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (15 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jun 2012

Taka in a train going back to his hometown. Tokyo, Japan. Sep. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (24 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2012

Taka is in a station. He takes a train to go to a company in rush hour every morning. Tokyo, Japan. Sep. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (18 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2012

Taka stands on a crossing in a town. He is on a way to a hospital. Tokyo, Japan. Jun. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (16 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2012

Taka in a station with his friend who know his past of attempting suicide. Tokyo, Japan. Apr.2012

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Saisei - Recovery (14 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2012

Taka stares at a wild cat on a road. Tokyo, Japan. Aug.2012

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Saisei - Recovery (13 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 May 2012

Taka comes out from a consulting room. He has seen to a hospital for psychological counseling once a month since he attempting suicide. Tokyo, Japan. Mar. 2012

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Fears of Economic Depression Loom in ...
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
24 Apr 2012

The international community is going to hand over full responsibility of the security and defense of Afghanistan to Afghan forces by 2014. It has been declared by the international community that the military pullout of the international forces will be accompanied with a reduction in aid money.

This happens at a time when 90 percent of GDP of Afghanistan is dependent on the foreign aid, and within the past ten years, solid measures to help Afghanistan become self sustainable financially have not been taken by the Afghan government and its international benefactors.

Many in Afghanistan believe that the reduction of aid without solid measures will lead to a financial crisis in Afghanistan, which will pave the ground for political instability and pervasive insecurity.

According to the World Bank's recent report TRANSITION IN AFGHANISTAN LOOKING BEYOND 2014, which came out in November 2011, the reduction in aid money will reduce civilian service delivery and will thus lead to economic depression.

The report says, "Aid for Afghanistan in 2010-11 was about $15.7 billion and World Bank's estimation suggests that a $0.5 billion decline in the external budget, which is going to happen, could affect 11,000-18,000 job opportunities in Afghanistan (on a six-month basis.)

Amar Rezayee, who is 23-year-old Afghan and an employee of one of the projects of USAID, which is the biggest donor in Afghanistan, says,

Translation sound bite #1, Amar Rezayee (USAID employee) (00:57- 1:52): "After 2014 the situation in Afghanistan will get worse because America says that they will take their troops out of Afghanistan, so it will effect security and will also have a bad affect on the economic situation in Afghanistan. Now there are a lot of salaries from USAID that are very high and can help me pay for my tuition at the American University of Afghanistan. But when Americans leave this country there will be high salaries for a limited number of people. Personally for me, it will have a very bad effect and I will not be able to attend this university because I won't be able to pay."

The World Bank report also states that In 2010/11, total public spending, including the “core budget” and “external budget,” was $17.1 billion.

Of this total spending, $15.7 billion was financed by international aid and only $1.9 billion of it was Afghanistan's budget.

Some people in Kabul are already scared of Afghanistan's future after 2014.

Vox Populi:

Translation Sound bite #2 Shafiq saighani (Kabul resident) (2:00-2:27) " If the US leaves Afghanistan, the financial support will be cut from Afghanistan, educational scholarships will be cut from Afghanistan, the unemployment will raise up and not only Taliban but also Iran and Pakistan will interfere in Afghanistan's affairs."

Analysts are also pessimistic about Afghanistan's future because of the foreseeable economic crisis after 2014.

Translation Sound bite #3, Candace Rondeaux (Crisis Group’s senior analyst in Kabul)(2:47-4:33) "The impact of the economical transition and the lack of planning will be tremendous. Politically it increases competition between Afghan elites. but more importantly what it does is it creates an environment of instability and insecurity and that I think will create incentives around the accedes of many, many Afghans for major capital flight, and also it will raise competition and rivalry between communities that could become very, very violent.

The impact of the internationals being present here has increased income tenfold for the average Afghan man. It has created opportunities for Afghan women, which weren't there before. Once all of that collapses, first there is the impact on the family life which is going to be tremendous. Where women once had the ability to go out and work and find some sort of independence, I think that will go away quickly, in fact I think that will be the first thing that will go away. For young men, who have been earning a thousand dollars a month or in some case five thousand dollars if they were working on an international organization, for them, they have been in a certain standard of living in the past ten years and have become completely dependent on this type of money. They have cars now, they have got houses to maintain and suddenly that goes away. Imagine the impact on the family; already there is a lot of intentions around money issues in every family, doesn't matter if its Afghan or American but when income starts to shrink that always has an impact."

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New Edict Threatens Progress for Afgh...
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
19 Apr 2012

Storyline: One of the most significant achievements of the new era in Afghanistan, after the fall of the Taliban, is in new freedoms for Afghan women. They are allowed to work in public, go to school, and participate in the political sphere-- something they were not allowed to do under the Taliban. However, the Afghan Religious Council, composed of hard-line religious leaders, has recently issued a new edict that calls women second-class citizens and prohibits them from traveling without the escort of a Mahram [male family member]. The edict was endorsed by the president, and has the potential of becoming law. Many people believe the Afghan government aims to woo the Taliban into peace talks by crafting and endorsing such a controversial mandate. The law has faced widespread resentment by Afghan women activists and Afghanistan’s civil society, putting pressure on the religious council and Ulema to revoke their edict.

Yalda Samih is young girl, her family lives in Kandahar province but Yalda lives in Kabul because she studies at the American University of Afghanistan.
Soundbite-1 Translation: Yalda Samih Student living in dorm: "it's very difficult for a girl to refrain from traveling unless she has a male chaperon, because not everyone has many brothers, or a father to accompany her everywhere. if it happens (the edict becomes a law), then we will face a lot of difficulties."
According to women activists in Kabul this is an unrealistic and unenforceable law for the citizens of Afghanistan.

Arezo Omid is a young woman activist who works with Young Women for Change, an organization of young women activists who advocate for women's rights. She says the law is unrealistic, and cannot be imposed on women in Afghanistan.
Soundbite-2 Translation: Arezo Omid (1:00-1:17): "I was very disappointed about this edict of Ulema council, because we are not rich people to have a male company accompany us during our trips outside the country. it's very difficult for those people who don't have a Mahram."

Soundbite-3 Translation: Yalda Samih (1:17-1:32): "if this edict becomes a law, I have to leave university. because I don't have anyone to come with me and live in the dorm. my father is responsible for the rest of the family, and I have a younger brother, who is studying school in Kandahar. So I would have to leave university.

Enayatullah Baligh a member of Islamic Ulema Council rejects Yalda's claim about the edict.
Soundbite-4 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh Member of Islamic Ulema councils: "Find a husband. find yourself a Mahram (male chaperon), these are all childish words."

Sounbite-5 Translation: Yalda samih (1:42-1:55): "I think it is impossible, because around 1.5 million widows live in Afghanistan. this edict also questions women's freedom. those who want to study can't get married and study. it is impossible."

Sounbite-6 Translation: Arezo Omid (1:56-2:05): "I personally think the government wants to get Taliban closer. If the Taliban come back to power, we will do the same thing we did last time and leave the country for the Taliban and immigrate to other countries"

Soundbite-7 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (2:07-2:14): "When they say, 'we got closer to the Taliban because we are scared of the Taliban,' it's totally wrong. We are not scared of the Taliban, it is the issue of religion."

Sounbite-8 Translation: Arezo Omid (2:15-2:21): "the problem is that high ranking government officials support these edicts."

Sounbite-9 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (2:23-2:44): "This edict does not need to be passed, it's a matter of religion. It is higher than the Constitution of Afghanistan, because the Afghanistan constitution states that no law is above the Islamic law. They must not ignore our edict, if they do, the Ulema Council will take action".

Soundbite-10 Translation: Soraya Kabul resident: "As an Afghan girl, I do not accept this edict, because Afghan men and women had, and must have, equal rights. And women make half of the society."

Soundbite-11 Translation: Sana Kabul resident: "I do not accept this edict, because it states that every woman should be accompanied by a man, and I would like to say that President Karzai's wife is a doctor and Mr. president can't be with his wife everywhere. So I don't accept this edict and will not obey it."

Soundbite-12 Translation: Enayatullah Baligh (3:43-4:23): Afghan women are Muslims, so they can never oppose this edict. If they oppose this edict that means they have rejected the religion. If a minister is traveling he takes a body guard with him, so why can't our sisters take someone like their brother, uncle or nephew with them? These women do not understand. It's for their good. If there are widows, the government is responsible to pay for their food, and the government is responsible to pay for the person to travel with her as well. It's all for the good of the women. I don't understand how it is NOT observing women's rights.

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Saisei - Recovery (21 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Apr 2012

His table in a room. Taka can not arrange anything. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (19 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Apr 2012

Taka smokes a pipe in his room. Tokyo, Japan. Apr.2012

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Saisei - Recovery (20 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Mar 2012

Taka is relaxed with smoking a pipe in his room. Tokyo, Japan. Apr. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (17 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Mar 2012

Taka talks with his friend in a cafe. He has not told his past of attempting suicide to anyone except only this friend. Tokyo, Japan. Apr. 2012

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A 'salaryman' waits to cross the street in downtown Tokyo.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A 'salaryman' in the subway. Tokyo is well-known as a commuter city, as many people commute in and out of the city mainly for work.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A white-collar worker smokes in downtown Tokyo.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A 'salaryman' in a train station in Tokyo. Tokyo is well-known as a commuter city, as many people commute in and out of the city mainly for work.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A 'salaryman' in the subway. Tokyo is well-known as a commuter city, as many people commute in and out of the city mainly for work.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

Three white-collar workers during a break at work. Mainly ‘middle-class’ freshman employees and general managers, this group of the japanese working population work extra hard and stay until late at the office.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

Three white-collar workers leaving a business building.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

Akihabara district in Tokyo. Also known as Akihabara Electronic Town, this area concentrates dozens of electronic goods based shops, mainly computer goods, video games, anime, and manga.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A white-collar worker ties his shoe at downtown in Tokyo.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

Skyline of the city of Tokyo. With a population of about 13,000,000 (2013) Tokyo is considered for many as a ‘working city’ due its huge working population.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A 'salaryman' in the subway. Tokyo is well-known as a commuter city, as many people commute in and out of the city mainly for work.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A 'salaryman' in the subway. Tokyo is well-known as a commuter city, as many people commute in and out of the city mainly for work.

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
23 Feb 2012

A white-collar worker checks his mobile phone in downtown Tokyo. The life of the 'salaryman' mainly revolves around their work at the office.

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Pacification (1 of 23)
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
By Rafael Fabres
12 Feb 2012

UPP soldier Alexandre Correa from the 4th batallion of the Sao Carlos UPP holds his service gun out the window of a police car while on patrol, in the Sao Carlos shantytown, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, February 25, 2012.

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Pacification (2 of 23)
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
By Rafael Fabres
11 Feb 2012

UPP Soldiers Annunciacçâo, Mario Silva and Vidal while on patrol in the shantytown of Sao Carlos, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, March 07, 2012.

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PACIFICATION
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
By Mais Istanbuli
11 Jan 2012

In preparation for the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Summer Olympics, Rio de Janeiro launched a security program called “UPP,” Police Pacification Unit.
UPPs are permanent police posts installed in the “favelas,” the sprawling shantytowns that house most of the city’s 1.2 million residents. Their mission is to eliminate drug trafficking and organized crime within these communities.
While many believe the UPPs have helped to quell the violence and bring prosperity to the favelas, others see the pacification program as a temporary cover-up to Rio’s problems with social disparity.

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If You Eat Garlic, You Will Get Full
Heraat, Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
11 Jan 2012

This film features the miserable life of a group of children in the western city of the Heraat province of Afghanistan by showing their work on the streets of the city.

More importantly, it shows the ill behavior of the residents of the city toward these kids. The film shows how they are treated as outcasts in the society, with people not allowing them in the sports fields, shops, and so on.

The film is ten minutes long.

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The Herbawi Textile Factory in Hebron...
Hebron, Palestine
By Elo B
18 Nov 2011

Herbawi Textile Factory, located in Hebron, is the only producer of the original koffiyeh in all of Palestine. The factory was founded in 1961 by Yasser Herbawi

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Saisei - Recovery (3 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Aug 2011

Emi hugs her new born baby in a restaurant. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (11 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Aug 2011

Emi and her child do watering to floweres. Tokyo, Japan. Aug. 2012

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Saisei - Recovery (1 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jul 2011

Emi and her child's shoes in an entrance of their home. Tokyo, Japan. Apr. 2012

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The Salaryman
Tokyo
By Biel Calderon
16 Jun 2011

A 'salaryman' sleeps in the subway. Heart attacks and strokes related to stress, lack of sleep and bad eating habits are the main medical reasons of deaths from overwork (known in Japan as Karoshi).

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Saisei - Recovery (9 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jun 2011

A wedding picture of Emi. She married when she was 24 years old and then she was a hard woker as a sales women in a company. Two years after wedding, she attempted suicide. Tokyo, Japan. Sep. 2011

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Saisei - Recovery (8 of 26)
Tokyo, Japan
By satoruniwa
01 Jun 2011

Emi and her child playing are in a child room. Tokyo, Japan. Sep. 2011