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Captured migrants in Libya 04
Misrata, Libya
By tom westcott
03 May 2015

Migrants from sub-Saharan Africa wait to be told to disembark from the Libyan Coastguard vessel which captured them in four inflatable dinghies. They have not yet been told that they will be transferred to already overcrowded migrant detention centres in Misrata and Tripoli.

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Captured migrants in Libya 05
Misrata, Libya
By tom westcott
03 May 2015

Migrants crowd on the bow of a Coastguard vessel which captured them on four inflatable boats off the coast of Libya

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Captured migrants in Libya 06
Misrata, Libya
By tom westcott
03 May 2015

Captured by the Libyan coastguard, Awal Yai, age 32, from Somalia waits with other migrants at Misrata port to be transferred to one of Libya's overcrowded detention centres. She sold everything she had to make the journey from Somalia to Libya.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story
Kafranbel
By Transterra Editor
30 Apr 2015

Majd Bayoush is a 22-year-old who fled his hometown of Kafranbel in north Syria with the aim of smuggling himself into Europe. After a perilous and complicated journey that lasted for nearly three months, he reached Germany, where he is waiting for the final procedures before he is granted political asylum.

The following is his story as told to Transterra Media.

I arrived to the port city of Izmir, Turkey on September 22, 2014. On the same day, I took an inflatable boat with 47 other migrants and sailed to the Greek island of Samos. We reached our destination after 2.5 hours. The boat deflated and sank after it hit the rocky shore.   

We had agreed with the smuggler Abu Abdu, a Syrian man nicknamed ‘the Tiger’, to surrender to the Greek police once we reach the island. Before leaving Turkey, I deposited 8,000 euros at a money transfer office called ‘al-Saeed’ controlled by the smuggling gang.  [This transfer company has offices in other countries.] Abu Abdu took 2,500 euros out of that sum.

We climbed a mountain on the island of Samos and reached a police station, where policemen confiscated all our possessions, including our mobile phones, and detained us for three days. On Sept. 25, the police authorities placed us below the deck in a cruise boat, which headed to an island near Samos. I do not know its name. There was a camp that held other captured illegal migrants who were Afghans, Asians and Palestinians. However, most of them were Syrians. 

FULL TEXT IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 03
Samos
By Transterra Editor
28 Apr 2015

Majd and other migrants at the ferry boat dock before the voyage to Athens after being released from a detention camp near Samos, Greece.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story ...
Kafranbel
By Transterra Editor
27 Apr 2015

Majd Bayoush is a 22-year-old who fled his hometown of Kafranbel in north Syria with the aim of smuggling himself into Europe. After a perilous and complicated journey that lasted for nearly three months, he reached Germany, where he is waiting for the final procedures before he is granted political asylum.

SHOTLIST

Shot of migrants on climbing a mountain after reaching the Greek island of Samos

OFF CAMERA
00:09 – 00:16
“This is the boat after UNINTELLIGIBLE."

Shot of the migrants on the boat to Athens

NAT Sound
01:01 – 01:03
“Film where we were staying.”

01:08 – 01:11
“Film the mountain there.” Shot of the migrants walking along railroad tracks from Greece to Macedonia

OFF CAMERA
01:31 – 01:32
“The road to Macedonia.”

Shot of migrant encampment near the Greek-Macedonian border

NAT Sound
01:52- 01:56
“I hope you have not filmed me.”

02:07 – 02:10
“We need light bulb and electricity.”

Shot of a Macedonian soldier overseeing the migrant’s tents on the border after burning them

OFF CAMERA
02:25 – 02:31
“The Macedonian army. The Greek-Macedonian border.” 02:39 - 02:43
“All you do is film.” Shot of burnt tents near the Greek-Macedonian border
Shot of migrants around a fire in Gevgilija, Macedonia

OFF CAMERA
03:16 -03:24
“The Macedonian-Greek border. Syrian and Iraqi refugee.”

Shot of migrants in the outdoors in an unnamed area near the Macedonian-Serbian border
Shot of migrants walking railroad tracks near the Greek-Macedonian border

OFF CAMERA
03:54 – 03:56
“The Macedonian border.”

Shot inside the central prison in Gazi Baba, Skpoje

OFF CAMERA
04:30 – 05:14
“This is the bathroom. This is where we wash. Even animals are washed in a better place. Animals are washed in a place that is better than this. These are the sinks. We are in Skopje.[SHOWING A WATER HEATER] They have cut the wires so that we do not shower with hot water. This is the toilet.”

Shot of migrants arriving to a house owned by a Pakistani smuggler who called himself Ahmad.

OFF CAMERA
05:18
“The Macedonian-Serbian border.” 05:34
“The Macedonian-Serbian border.”

Shot of the courtyard of a house owned by a Pakistani smuggler who called himself Ahmad
Shot of migrants walking at night in the outdoors in Serbia

NAT Sound
05:57
“-Are you filming? -Yes.”

Shot of migrants being transported by tractor in Serbia

Shot of migrants walking at night in the outdoors in Serbia
Exterior shot of the house in which Majd lives in the village of Tönning near Hamburg

06:38
OFF CAMERA
“This is the house to which I was moved in Hamburg. They gave me this house until my residency permit is issued. This is a village called Tunning to the north of Hamburg.”

Traveling shot of a street in Tönning, near Hamburg

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Europe-bound Migrants Held in Libyan ...
Misrata
By Mohamed Lagha
20 Apr 2015

Misrata, Libya
April 21, 2015

Dozens of men, women and children are held in deplorable conditions in a jail in Misrata, controlled by the security forces loyal to the Islamist Libyan government in Tripoli. The detainees who appear in this video, most of whom come from east African countries, were caught in Libya on their way to try to reach Europe. An office that controls immigration is deporting the detainees to their countries through their countries’ embassies in Tunisia. However, Somalian and Eritrean detainees cannot return because of the instability plaguing their countries. Some of them have been in this prison for five months.

An interviewed female detainee from Eritrea, who introduced herself as Yodit, said that she was arrested with her cousin and other immigrants in the Libyan desert as they were heading to Europe. The group had started their clandestine journey in Khartoum, Sudan. Yodit said that they spent one month on the road before being arrested. By the time of the interview, she had spent two weeks in custody and was worried that her family back home might think that she was dead. The woman, who appears to be in her twenties, also complained that the detention center is overcrowded and lacks proper ventilation.

Various shots of detainees.

TRANSCRIPT
Soundbite (Arabic/English, Woman) Yodit, Female Eritrean detainee

00:48 – 04:14

"Q: What is your name? [Arabic]

A: What? [Arabic]

Q: Your name. [Arabic]

A: Yodit.

Q: How long have you been here?

A: Just one week.

Q: One week?

A: Yeah.

Q: Where are you from?

A: From Eritrea.

Q: You came by… the desert?

A: Yeah, the desert.

Q: How exactly? Through which country?

A: By the Khartoum to the Libya desert. [UNINTELLIGIBLE] When [we] came here, they catch us.

Q: Where?

A: In the desert of Libya.

Q: Where?

A: In Libya, but the place exactly, what it’s called…. I don’t know.

Q: In the desert, or a gate?

A: Desert, desert.

Q: The desert?

A: Yeah.

Q: Is it near from here?

A: I think [it is] far.

Q: One hour? Two hours? How much time?

A: Four hours from here.

Q: And then what are you doing here? What did they tell you?

A: We want to travel to Europe. So they catch us, they arrest us… even before here, just one week another place, the place which kept us. We came also here one week. That means two weeks under arrest. So they… you see they are stand up all night here. The [UNINTELLIGIBLE] is bad It smells bad all night. There is no air. The place is bad, really. [UNINTELLIGIBLE]The condition is bad, seriously.

Q: What did they tell you? Did they tell you that they are going out? Did they call your embassy?

A: No. No phone. We families don’t know where we are.

Q: They didn’t call your families?

A: Yeah. Because we don’t have a phone here. So no one knows where they are. I don’t know. Maybe our families they think [we] die or something.

Q: You are here alone? You don’t have any family here?

A: She’s my cousin. So we are two.

Q: Now you are here for one week.

A: Here. But another place also one week. The way…. but one month is in the way in the desert. We are hungry, there is no water, there is no anything. We were about to die. But that is good, they save us and keep us here. But I don’t know [UNINTELLIGIBLE] about time I don’t know anything.

Q: Thank you.

A: You’re welcome. Thank you, too.”

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 22
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
19 Apr 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. NESS, a Hip Hop dancer, here seen in the suburb Sevran. 19 April 2015, Sevran France.

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Syrian Refugee Stories: Hussein
Berlin,Germany
By luigi serenelli
10 Mar 2015

Hussein, a 27 year-old from Aleppo, considers Germany the right place in Europe to fulfill his career as an IT engineer while his home country, Syria, enters the fifth year of an unending civil war.

“I came to Germany to complete and advance my studies to become an engineer,” said Hussein. “I don’t know exactly how many years of my previous study institutions here will officially recognize. Maybe they will put me in the first year, but I am ready to re-start from the first year at university if that should be the case.”

Hussein arrived in Berlin on March 6th via Turkey and Greece. The civil war in Syria forced him to withdraw from a five-years course in IT engineering at the university in Aleppo.

“I had a diploma as a computer technician, then I decided to upgrade my certificate by attending engineering courses. I studied for two years in an institute for the diploma and then four years at a university,” Hussein said.

Back in Syria, Hussein’s livelihood was decent, but his wage of around 250 euros didn’t secure him economic independence.

“I had my own house that my parents gave to me, but I didn’t live there, and I had my own car, but they were both destroyed,” he said.

In Aleppo, Hussein taught computer science in a school to students from 6th to 11th grade. Meanwhile, he had a second job.

“I was a swim instructor. I used to go directly to the swimming pool when I finished work at the school, and also I worked as a lifeguard. I was in a good situation before the war.”

Many other skilled Syrians take the decision to start anew a life in Europe. On the continent, Germany’s powerful mix of stable economy and welfare state catches hearts and minds of young, talented asylum seekers from Syria. 

“There is life in Germany, more than other Scandinavian countries such as Sweden or Denmark,” Hussein believes. “Berlin is the best city in Europe for everything. The university is very good here in Germany. Most people are helpful towards new people coming.”

The number of refugees arriving in Berlin from war-torn Syria spiked last year. According to LAGeSo – Landesamtes für Gesundheit und Soziales - the operative branch of the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs of the State of Berlin - in 2013 only 695 Syrians applied to start the asylum procedure in the German capital. In 2014, that number jumped to 2.518. The German Federal migration office recorded 5.340 new asylum requests from Syrians since last January, which in the same month of 2014 numbered only 1.637, a 224 per cent increase.

Syrians coming to Europe try to circumvent the Dublin regulation – imposing asylum seekers to stay in the first country of arrival in Europe – by asking to register as asylum seekers either in Berlin or Stuttgart, southern Germany. Both cities have decided to issue residence permits even if refugees had registered somewhere else in Europe.

“All Syrians, when they come from Turkey to Austria or Germany, should pass through Hungary or Italy; and the police maybe catches them and takes the fingerprints,” Hussein said. “For that, all people are coming here and you can see too many people. I came via Turkey, Greece and then I took a flight to Germany.”

Hussein’s family is now scattered in the Middle East: His father is in Lebanon, his mother is still in Syria. “I am in contact with my parents every day via internet,” he said. “In Germany, I have my friends from Syria and two cousins who are German nationals.”

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Syrian Stories: Hussein 01
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
10 Mar 2015

Hussein, 27, poses for sits in front of LAGeSo – Landesamtes für Gesundheit und Soziales - the operative branch of the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs of the State of Berlin - where he awaits his turn to ask for a residence permit.

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Syrian Stories: Hussein 02
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
09 Mar 2015

Hussein, 27, poses for sits in front of LAGeSo – Landesamtes für Gesundheit und Soziales - the operative branch of the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs of the State of Berlin - where he awaits his turn to ask for a residence permit.

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Syrian Stories: Hussein 03
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
09 Mar 2015

Hussein, 27, poses for sits in front of LAGeSo – Landesamtes für Gesundheit und Soziales - the operative branch of the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs of the State of Berlin - where he awaits his turn to ask for a residence permit.

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Domestic Workers Face 'Modern Slavery...
Hong Kong
By Miguel Candela
01 Mar 2015

320,000 migrant women are exposed to all kinds of physical and psychological abuse in the domestic service sector of Hong Kong. This story is a testimony of their experiences and struggles.

After being repeatedly abused and realizing that her situation would not improve, in a desperate attempt, Kamsiah ran away from her employer's house without money or documentation. Subsequently she was accused of stealing her employer's wallet which was said to contain around 900 US Dollars. Unfortunately, false accusations are a common practice to pressure migrant workers and avoid paying the wages owed to them. Barefooted, without money nor documentation, she sought refuge in a 24-hour fast food restaurant and waited until another compatriot helped her and took her to a shelter.

Esther C. Bangkawayan is the director of Bethune House shelter, where foreign domestic helpers who suffer abuse find shelter, food, and legal advice. They now house about a dozen women in trouble, but at times they even have to squeeze around 20 people in the small house nestled beside a church in Kowloon. A domestic helper herself, Esther is campaigning the government to scrap two rules she deems unfair: one which forbids employees from changing their employers more than three times a year, and another one which doesn’t allow them from changing to work at another sector of the economy.

42 year old filipino domestic helper Grace signed a misleading labour contract to work in Hong Kong but she instead ended up in Dalian, a northeast Chinese city 1,979 km far from Hong Kong. After confronting her employer about the situation, Grace was put into a return flight to Hong Kong without her pending salary and with only 200 RMB in her wallet. Grace has made now a formal complaint against the recruitment agency which made her labour contract. However, she is not very optimistic regarding her chances of recovering the debt of 40,000 pesos she currently has in the Philippines.

Eni Lestari, Indonesian, is the spokesperson for the Justice for Erwiana Committee. A domestic helper herself, she hopes to get justice for one of her compatriots, Erwiana Sulistyaningsih, who came to Hong Kong seeking for a better life and future but instead found a form of modern slavery. Erwiana’€™s employers hit her so severely that her brain has sustained irreversible injuries. As a result, she is unable to walk properly and has blurred vision. Her employer punched Erwiana so violently that her teeth cracked. She was sent to Indonesia with her body full of bruises and 8 US dollars in her pocket. Outraged immigrants like Lestari demand now justice and prison for her attackers. The Court has already declared them guilty and sentence is pending.

On Sundays thousands of Indonesian women gather in the streets and public spaces around Hong Kong to take advantage of their only day off. Most take their own food and an umbrella and talk to their friends all day long.

“€œWe barely have any money, so we have to take our lunch from our employer's house and sit in any public space that we can so we can enjoy our leisure time with our friends,”€ said Kamsiah.

To enjoy their free time and to get to know other immigrant workers in Hong Kong, immigrant groups organize activities for the women, such as beauty contests and self-defense classes in Victoria Park.  Persaudaraan Setia Hati Terate Fight Club teaches women to protect themselves from abusive employers.

Not only helping the women get away from the world of domestic work for the little time they have off or boosting their ability to defend themselves, such activities are the only social contact many have; and friends made during Sundays can be of great importance when difficulties arise.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

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German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin, Germany
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

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German Social Worker Talks on Syrian ...
Berlin
By luigi serenelli
26 Feb 2015

Joachim Rueffer is a social worker at the Berlin-based association Kommt Mit e V. He explains that a great part of the Syrian refugees arriving in Berlin and Germany are doctors, engineers, teachers, and skilled workers. Those people are in some cases forced to live in public gyms used by the Berlin administration to cope with the high influx of asylum seekers arriving in the German capital. The German authorities do not automatically recognized Syrian asylum seekers’ qualifications, and long bureaucratic procedures postpone the access to the job market by years. A waterlogged real estate market in Berlin also makes it hard to find a flat at a cost that the social welfare office is willing to sustain. Syrian refugees make up by far the largest foreign group asking for asylum in Germany.

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Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
20 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war. The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters. Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo. In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon. The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

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Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
18 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war.

The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters.

Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo.

In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon.
The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Teenage Fighter
09:17 – 12:19
Why do you not speak Norwegian?
I do not know how to.
Why?
I came to Iraq a long time ago and I cannot speak [Norwegian].
Did you not learn Norwegian at school?
I was young. When I came from Norway I was young. I had not gone to school.
How old were you?
About four years old.
Do you wish to return?
Yes.
Why? Why do you want to return?
The country there is better and safer.
What are you doing in Iraq?
I study at the hawza [Shiite religious school].
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
In Iraq there are holy shrines which I visited. My father came here to practice jihad. He went to Jarf al-Sakhr. I am proud of him for practicing jihad. I went with him after they liberated the area. I wore his military vest and went with him.
That was after the liberation?
Yes, after the liberation was over.
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
I am proud of him. I am proud of my father and his position as an Iraqi military.
Do you feel scared sometimes?
No.
Do you feel scared that ISIS is killing people in Iraq?
No. I do not feel scared.
You do not feel scared?
No.
Are you scared of getting killed?
No, I am not.
Why not?
There is nothing to worry about here.
Did you participate in any major battle?
No. I used to go with my father to [the battlefield] after the battle was over.
Do you not think that you are too young [to be part of an armed group]?
No.
I have not fought. I used to go to a certain area after the liberation was over.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
No.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway to and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
I did not come to Iraq to fight. I came to study and be with my people and near the holy shrines.
Is there anything that you miss in Norway? Do you miss any people? Do you have certain good memories? Do you miss any friends or neighbors?
I miss them sometimes but we came to Iraq for the sake of the Imams and to study.

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Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander: "I...
Karbala
By mushtaq mohammed
18 Feb 2015

February 18, 2015
Karbala, Iraq

Norwegian Shiite Militia Commander Abass al Assadi appears in a second video, interviewed at his home in Karbala. Despite video evidence and what he claimed in is first video on Transterra Media, he now says that he did not and will not take his son to war.

The Transterra contributor visited Abass at his home in Hay al-Ghadir, Karbala, where he lives with his wife and two sons Ali and Hussein. The day before the interview Abass had arrived home for a nine-day vacation, but he then received a call from his commanders with orders to head back to Samarrah with some of his fighters.

Accodring to Abass his eldest son Ahmed, who travels between California and Oslo, has been arrested and questioned by the Norwegian authorities before being released. The same thing happened to his own brother who also lives in Oslo.

In the previous video Abass and his youngest son Hussein appeared to be in a training camp for the al-Hashid al-Shaabi or “Popular Crowd”, Shiite militias, where the boy is seen spending time in training with the fighters and firing a weapon.
The boy said that he had participated in battles against ISIS, such as in Jurf al-Sakher.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abbas al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Shiaa Militia Commander:

Abbas al-Asadi: “I will be heading to Samaraa, after this interview a car will come and pick us up and we will go there.

Interviewer: Did you just return from Samaraa for this interview?

Abbas: “No, I came to see my family but they [Army commanders] called me and told me to return. I am now in the army fighting ISIS but I need to return. They need me there. I took a few days off and went there, but now they need me, they called me and I have to return.”

Interviewer: Don't you think you are breaking the Norwegian law, or technically the law in all of Europe, by letting your children participate in war?

Abbas: “I will not break the Norwegian law or the Arabic law. My children came with me after the area was liberated, after the area became safe and the families returned to it. But my little child likes to wear my uniform and I taught him how to shoot just so he can have some experience. But he does not participate in war with me. I know he cannot participate in war, war is not for him.”

Interviewer: The last time we met with them, your children told us that they participated in war and in victories and in fighting ISIS. What is the reason for such statements?

Abbas: “He considers himself to be one with his father, and since his father participated and he entered Jurf al-Sakher after it was liberated, he considered himself as a participant. Of course he did not participate in the battles in Jurf al-Sakher, do you think I would want death for my son? It is impossible.”

Interviewer: When was the last time you went to Norway?

Abbas: “I was there last in 2008.”

Interviewer: Do you intend to return to Norway and if so, when?

Abbas: “Yes I intend to return to Norway, after the war with ISIS ends.”

Interviewer: How many are in your family?

Abbas: “Some of them are living in Oslo, and I have another son who is a doctor in America. According to our beliefs, a person who leaves jihad is an infidel. We ask God to help us and support us.”

Interviewer: Is your wife pleased with what you are doing?

Abbas: “Yes my wife is proud of me because I am fighting with the good people against the enemies.”
Interviewer: What do you want to tell the Norwegian government and the European Union who might think that you brought your son to participate in war?
Abbas: “I did not and will not involve my son in war, I repeat that, I did not and will not involve any of my youngest children in war. They go to school.. just like in anywhere else. When we liberated the area, many people and journalists came and my son was one of those people. He wanted to wear my uniform, and I allowed him to. It has nothing to do with war. We fought him the Arabic traditions, such as shooting, horseback riding, and other simple things. If a war happens in Norway, God forbid, I am willing to fight alongside them. If Norway or Europe needs me to fight, I will definitely help them. Norway is my country and Iraq is my country.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Boy) Hussein al-Assadi , Iraqi-Norwegian Teenage Fighter
09:17 – 12:19
Why do you not speak Norwegian?
I do not know how to.
Why?
I came to Iraq a long time ago and I cannot speak [Norwegian].
Did you not learn Norwegian at school?
I was young. When I came from Norway I was young. I had not gone to school.
How old were you?
About four years old.
Do you wish to return?
Yes.
Why? Why do you want to return?
The country there is better and safer.
What are you doing in Iraq?
I study at the hawza [Shiite religious school].
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
In Iraq there are holy shrines which I visited. My father came here to practice jihad. He went to Jarf al-Sakhr. I am proud of him for practicing jihad. I went with him after they liberated the area. I wore his military vest and went with him.
That was after the liberation?
Yes, after the liberation was over.
UNINTELLIGIBLE QUESTION
I am proud of him. I am proud of my father and his position as an Iraqi military.
Do you feel scared sometimes?
No.
Do you feel scared that ISIS is killing people in Iraq?
No. I do not feel scared.
You do not feel scared?
No.
Are you scared of getting killed?
No, I am not.
Why not?
There is nothing to worry about here.
Did you participate in any major battle?
No. I used to go with my father to [the battlefield] after the battle was over.
Do you not think that you are too young [to be part of an armed group]?
No.
I have not fought. I used to go to a certain area after the liberation was over.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
No.
Do you think that young men of your age should come from Norway to and other European countries to fight against ISIS?
I did not come to Iraq to fight. I came to study and be with my people and near the holy shrines.
Is there anything that you miss in Norway? Do you miss any people? Do you have certain good memories? Do you miss any friends or neighbors?
I miss them sometimes but we came to Iraq for the sake of the Imams and to study.

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Invisible People: Athens' 'Stuck' Ref...
Athens, Greece
By angelos
15 Feb 2015

First of a trilogy of feature documentary films in progress that observes the lives of undocumented refugees from Syria, Palestine and Iraq trapped in Greece on their way to Austria, Sweden and Belgium. Invisible People is an intimate look into their lives in a neighborhood of Athens as they try to make their way to the “European dream.”

The first part of the documentary trilogy Invisible People portrays undocumented immigrants in the claustrophobic urban environment of Athens as they wait for months for human traffickers to smuggle them out. Set in one of the most multicultural Athenian streets, where Golden Dawn Nazi party has its headquarters, the camera continuously records their fears and dreams as they repeatedly attempt to leave the country. Abandoned by the system, their only hope is a network of human traffickers that spans from the Middle East all the way to Central and Northern Europe.

BROADCAST READY FILM AVAILABLE AND EDITED TO YOUR LENGTH AND FORMAT ON REQUEST

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Refugees in Italy Create a Football Team
Mineo
By Jobard Olivier
24 Jan 2015

Refugees in Italy create a football club that plays in Italian official league. ASD Cara Mineo was created in 2013 after residents at a migrant reception centre began holding football tournaments among themselves. Now their team of 25 players is officially registered by the Italian football federation, and has joined the 10th tier of the football league known as Category Three. The team had to miss the first three games because players could not be registered without residence permits, which still have not arrived. But after "a little goodwill from everyone," they were allowed to participate, their spokesman told a local newspaper. Originally, the team consisted of refugee footballers from countries around Africa, who lived on 2.5 euros a day and three free meals offered them in the camps.

"Rice, pasta, fruits, it's a nice diet for a football player,” said Mohamed Traore, a 24 year-old defender who plays for the team.

Abou Daouda, 23 years old from Ghana (last photo) did not want to play with the team. He loves football but he does not like the level nor the style of the team. "Me, I play Brazilian football,” he said, so he prefers to run alone, and to stay fit following his own regime.

These young migrants dream of entering Europe legally and making a life for themselves and their families through football. So far, all of the players who started the team now live on the European continent and have secured residency.

Thousands of migrants land in Sicily each year after making the crossing from north Africa, often by boat. About 4,000 people are held at the reception centre in Mineo, which formerly housed the families of US military personnel stationed at the nearby Sigonella Nato base.

FULL ARTICLE AVAILABLE ON REQUEST

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 01
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Housing complex Chene Pointu is one of the most dilapidated apartment complexes in France, only here the poor can rent an appartment without questions asked. 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 02
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Housing complex Chene Pointu is one of the most dilapidated apartment complexes in France, only here the poor can rent an appartment without questions asked. 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 05
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Letter boxes in the housing complex Chene Pointu. 22 January 2015, Clichy-sous-Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 08
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. The building of a new police station was one of the measures taken after the riots. 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 09
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy-sous-Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Keita Konate 23 years and her baby Asa 8 month. The family rents one room of 9 m2 for 450 euros a month. 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 11
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Mother and child during the midday school break. 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 15
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
22 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Resident originally from Mali walks home after shopping, 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 06
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
21 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. A makeshift mosque in the appartment complex Chene Pointu. 21 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 04
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
20 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Housing complex Chene Pointu is one of the most dilapidated apartment complexes in France, only here the poor can rent an appartment without questions asked. 22 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 07
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
20 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Café Aram is the only cafe in the appartment complex Chene Pointu. 20 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France.

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 10
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
20 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005 riots broke out in the French suburbs. It started here with the death of two boys, in Clichy sous Bois, 15 km from Paris, an economically deprived suburb. Bedroom for 4 children of single mother from Cameroon in the housing complex ‘Chene Pointu’. 20 January 2015, Clichy sous Bois, France

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Paris's 'Banlieus' 23
Paris, France
By Steven Wassenaar
14 Jan 2015

10 years ago, on 27 October 2005, riots broke out in the French suburbs. The neigborhood "La Grand Borne" in Grigny is one of the most infamous around Paris. January 14, 2015, Grigny, France.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 22
Lojane
By Transterra Editor
28 Nov 2014

Migrants gathered in the house of a Pakistani smuggler called Ahmad in Lojane, Macedonia.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 19
Skopje
By Transterra Editor
27 Nov 2014

The Moroccan smuggler nicknamed The Desert Man (al-Sahrawi) appears on the right, wearing a white sweatshirt, inside a camp for illegal migrants in Skopje, Macedonia. This smuggler had bribed the guards to allow him to move freely in and out of the camp.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 06
Gevgelija
By Transterra Editor
08 Nov 2014

Migrants pose for a photo at their makeshift camp inside Macedonian territory near the border with Greece.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 15
Macedonia
By Transterra Editor
08 Nov 2014

A tent in the makeshift encampment in Gevgilija, Macedonia where the migrants waited for a smuggler on their second attempt to cross into Serbia

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 05
Polykastro
By Transterra Editor
07 Nov 2014

Migrants walk along the railroad tracks starting from Polykastro, Greece. This was their second attempt to reach the border with Macedonia.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 14
Polykastro
By Transterra Editor
07 Nov 2014

Migrants walk along the railroad tracks starting from Polykastro, Greece. This was their second attempt to reach the border with Macedonia.

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Human Trafficking: A Migrant's Story 12
Gevgelija
By Transterra Editor
27 Oct 2014

Migrants waited in this makeshift encampment in Gevgilija, Macedonia for the smuggler who would escort them to Serbia.