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Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehic...
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
02 Feb 2015

One of the new unmanned armed IDF combat patrol vehicles operating on the Israel Gaza border.

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Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehic...
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
02 Feb 2015

One of the new unmanned armed IDF combat patrol vehicles operating on the Israel Gaza border.

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Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehicles
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
21 Jan 2015

Like drones in the sky, unmanned armored remote control land vehicles are already seeing extensive action on the Israel-Gaza border. The Israeli Army is now the first and only Army in the world that uses these land drones in combat zones. The unmanned remote control vehicles come in two sizes and are armed with 0.5 Calibre Machine guns and other classified armoury. The vehicles are controlled and driven by IDF women operators only and patrol the border between Israel and the Hamas controlled Gaza strip, replacing manned patrols and saving lives and manpower. During the years they have been operational, the unmanned patrols have been attacked twice by IED`S and machine gunfire. They have discovered breaches in the border fence and chased down infiltrators. During the last 50 day war between Israel and Hamas, they carried out many missions, mostly suppllying fighting units with food and ammunition behind enemy lines. They also conducted surveillance operations. "This is the future of the modern combat field " says the commander of this unique unit.

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Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehic...
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
21 Jan 2015

One of the new unmanned armed IDF combat patrol vehicles operating on the Israel Gaza border.

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Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehic...
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
21 Jan 2015

The vehicles are operated by an all female IDF unit.

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Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehic...
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
21 Jan 2015

One of the new unmanned armed IDF combat patrol vehicles operating on the Israel Gaza border.

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Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehic...
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
21 Jan 2015

One of the new unmanned armed IDF combat patrol vehicles operating on the Israel Gaza border.

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Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehic...
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
21 Jan 2015

One of the new unmanned armed IDF combat patrol vehicles operating on the Israel Gaza border.

Thumb sm
Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehic...
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
21 Jan 2015

One of the new unmanned armed IDF combat patrol vehicles operating on the Israel Gaza border.

Thumb sm
Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehic...
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
21 Jan 2015

One of the new unmanned armed IDF combat patrol vehicles operating on the Israel Gaza border.

Thumb sm
Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehic...
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
21 Jan 2015

One of the new unmanned armed IDF combat patrol vehicles operating on the Israel Gaza border.

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Israel's Unmanned Ground Combat Vehic...
Israel
By Oren Rosenfeld
20 Jan 2015

One of the new unmanned armed IDF combat patrol vehicles operating on the Israel Gaza border.

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A Village Divided Between Lebanon and...
Dhaira
By wissam fanash
03 Jan 2015

Various elder residents of a Lebanese village on the border with Israel tell the story of how their village and families came to be divided by the creation of Israel in 1948. Part of the Aramsha clan, their lands included four of five villages that lay on both side of the future Lebanese-Israeli border prior to 1948. Today, they live in constant surveillance (a drone can be seen in the video) and are separated from their kin living in Israel by tank patrols, barbed wire and land mines. One resident speaks of how she lost her leg to a land mine laid by Israelis when attempting to attend her father's funeral on the other side of the border. Since she can no longer obtain a permit to visit her relatives, it has been 20 years since she last saw her family.

SHOTLIST AND TRANSCRIPT

Various of Fakhri Fanash with grandchildren walking in garden
Various of Israeli armored vehicles driving along Israeli-Lebanese border

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Fakhri Fanash, Dignitary of Aramsha Clan
01:26 – 04:49

“We are part of the Aramsha clan, which live in about four or five villages. This is Dhaira; over there are the villages of Idmith, Iribbin and Jordeh. We are all cousins, brothers and relatives. The lands that can be seen within the occupied territories are ours. I can name them: over there is Safra, Bater, Jordeh, Jrad Moussa; this Khallet al-Adas or Khallet al-Saheb. All of these lands were ours. We were part of one tribe. The Israeli invasion, or colonialism, divided this land. Some people are here in Dhaira – about one quarter [of the clan] and three quarters stayed there. There were four brothers, two of whom stayed there and two came here.

After 1948, they [Israelis] started annexing lands and [planting] mines and barbed wires. They set up the land the way they wanted. They took this part of the land.
In the Lebanese part of these territories, which is still with us, there are landmines over there where these olive trees are planted.

Behind Jordeh there is a cemetery, called the Aramsha Cemetery. This was both ours and theirs. You see, when my grandfather died, people were crying. There was a Lebanese Army patrol to keep people apart. All of our relatives from Palestine came to the cemetery, but we were about two meters away from each other. When the Army saw that people were crying and concerned for each other, it allowed people from both sides to come together. There were no barbed wires or landmines in that spot. All people came together, and the funeral became like a wedding because people were able to reunite.

Look at that patrol [DRONE CAN BE SEEN IN THE SKY]. It goes on day and night. There are also armored vehicles and tanks. We have property deeds form the Ottoman era that prove [our ownership over] the land that you can see in front of you, which is vast. We have documents written by the notary of Acre. During peace negotiations between Lebanon and the Israeli enemy, the ministry of foreign affairs asked us to present these papers, which we did. Afterwards, things went bad among Arab countries and we did not get anything from this.”

Wide of Israeli patrol
Wide/ zoom out of Fakhri Fanash’s grandchildren watch Israeli armored vehicle on other side of the border.
Various of Khairiya al-Moghais walking

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Khairiya al-Moghais, Aramsha Clan Member

05: 14 – 09:05

“This is my sister [SHOWING PHOTOS]. These are my brother and his wife. This is also my brother and his wife. And this is my daughter.

It has been about 20 years. I used to visit them before, using a permit. Now I cannot go anywhere. I have not seen her for 20 years. This is also my brother. This is my daughter and this is my other daughter. When I see [their photo] I cry. I wish I could meet them.

I left my parents and ran away to Lebanon when I met my husband. I stayed at my sister’s, and then they took me to Beirut. I was sentenced to one month [in prison].

I have not seen my parents for 40 years.

Interviewer: Are you not communicating with them?
- No Interviewer: You do not know what is happening to them either?
- No, no. They forbid them… we used to shout to each other, but since the liberation we have not dared to talk to them. They do not dare to talk with us either.
Interviewer: Who is preventing you from doing that?
- We are scared. We are scared here. We do not dare. And over there, [Israeli] patrols guard the barbed wire.

I once heard an announcement over the loud speaker coming from the village of Jordeh. I thought my father died. I stepped on a wire. I was not thinking of the wire, I was only thinking of my father. I heard a sound and I thought I had stepped on a metal can. I did not realize it was a landmine. I walked a bit further and the landmine went off. I fell on the ground. I saw that my leg was cut off. I started to scream and people came in a hurry from Dhaira and from the other side, but people could not talk to each other.

I was lying in the middle; Israel was on this side and Lebanon on the other. Then they carried me away.

I stayed on the floor. I then extended my hand to a soldier from a patrol because I was in a lot of pain. I wanted him to lift me. He waved his hand as if to say “no.” They removed the landmines then took me in an ambulance.

I wish I could see my family and daughters before I… Then, I would not care if I died… All my relatives and family… we were all living together happily. Nobody did anything to us. This is our life.”

Wide of Israeli military post
Wide/ traveling of Israeli Humvee driving on other side of border
Wide of United Nation border demarcation barrel
Wide of territory across barbed wires
Various of landmine warning signs
Close up of flour/ demarcation barrel in background
Wide of car moving on other side of the Israeli border
Wide of Israeli military post
Various of landmine warning signs and border fence
Traveling of Jordeh, a village inhabited by Aramsha clan and held by Israel
Various of Israeli military transmission tower
Traveling of United Nations helicopter
Traveling of village Mazraat al-Aramsha, a village inhabited by Aramsha clan and controlled by Israel
Wide of woman walking by border fence on the Israeli side
Various of trees
Wide of houses on Israeli side of the border
Wide of children and cattle on Israeli side of border
Wide of landmine warning sign
Various of children on side of border

NAT Sound (Arabic) conversation across the border
-We are from Palestine. - What is your name? -Mohammad. - Mohammad what? -[UNINTELLIGIBLE] -Mohammad what? -Mohammad Jomaa. We are Arabs, not Jews. - Who are you? -Ahmad -Omar, Ali, Ahmad, Hammoudi, Lyn”

Children on Lebanese side waving the Palestinian flag.
Wide of Israeli Humvee driving by

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Israeli Army Patrols the Lebanese Border
Lebanon-Israel border
By [email protected]
06 Dec 2014

Marjoyoun, Lutfallah al-Daher

The Israeli forces have started the process of shielding their locations and tank stations on the hill overlooking al-Motanazahat and al-Wazani.

An armored bulldozer was seen establishing a new location to overlook al-Wazani and al-Motanazahat, under extreme protection by a Merkava tank and a military vehicle.

On the Lebanese side, UNIFIL members and the army have witnessed the Israeli work that started on Saturday, a holiday for Israelis.

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Palestine: When a School is Illegal
Khan al-Ahmar
By Vinciane Jacquet
14 Nov 2014

November 16, 2014
Khan al Ahmar, West Bank, Palestine

The Khan al-Ahmar School serves the children of the Jahalin Bedouin community in the West Bank and has been declared illegal by Israeli authorities. It is now facing possible demolition. Built in 2009, the school was constructed with mud and tires due to a lack of funds and an Israeli law that bans Palestinians in Area C of the West Bank from building structures made of cement. The children now attend school in poorly equipped classrooms with no heating, leaking ceilings, and little electricity. However, it is possible that even this primitive learning environment could be snatched from them at a moment's notice. Over 140 students are currently enrolled in the school. The nearest alternative school is located about 45 minutes away by car. The school's imminent demolition is part of a plan by Israeli authorities to displace the Jahalin Bedouin living in "Area C" of the occupied West Bank. The Khan Al-Ahmar School and Bedouin community is located in the Jerusalem periphery, between the Israeli settlements of Ma'ale Adumim and Kfar Adumim. While the Jahalin Bedouin have a longstanding presence in this area (they settled in the area in 1948, after being evicted by Israel from their lands in the Negev desert), the community and school present an obstacle to Israel's planned settlement expansion and construction of the separation barrier. The community lives with the constant threat of displacement. Every year, the school administration goes to court in order to postpone the planned demolition of the school. This year they were lucky and the court sided with them. However, the order still stands and next year they may not be so lucky.

Tents and Tombstones: Bedouins in Isr...
Al-Araqib
By Vinciane Jacquet
10 Nov 2014

November 12, 2014
al-Araqib, Israel

Al Araqib is one of the 46 Bedouin villages in the Negev desert that the state of Israel refuses to recognize. The residents of the village, both past and present, inherited these lands from their fathers and grandfathers. Harassment from the Israeli Army and vigilanties has become commonplace for the Araqib Bedouin. The harassment dates back to 1948, when a gang of Zionist militants rounded up 14 Bedouin men working in a field in al-Araqib and summarily executed them. Since 1948, homes and properties in al-Araqib have been regularly destroyed and stolen. On July 27th, 2010, the village was totally demolished. Since then, the village has been re-built and destroyed 33 times. However, many residents were unable to stay and moved to the recognized village of Rahat. Those who did choose to stay are confined to the area of the Al-Turi cemetary and have been living under harsh conditions, always scared of an unexpected visit from the soldiers.

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Israeli Artillery Hits Southern Lebanon
Shebaa Farms
By Karamallah Daher
06 Oct 2014

October 7, 2014
Shebaa Farms, Lebanon

Israeli forces fire artillery shells into southern Lebanon after two IDF soldiers were wounded by an improvised explosive device. Hezbollah later claimed responsibility for the attack on the Israeli soldiers.

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Protest Demonstration - Hebron
Hebron, Palestine
By Ibrahim Hamouz
16 Aug 2014

Hebron, Palestinian Territories

August 15, 2014

Protestors demonstrating against the conflict in Gaza clash with Israeli soldiers in the Bab el Zawya district of Hebron.

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South African Jewish Veteran of IDF R...
By mproductions247
22 Jul 2014

A thoughtful, honest and probing interview with a South African Jewish veteran of the IDF whose mother's family perished in the Holocaust and who served as a tank-driver in the West Bank in the 1970s but quickly came to oppose taking part in military operations in an occupied territory, as he puts it. In the video, he discusses the prospects for peace (one-state solution), the opportunities Israel has to become a leading player in the Middle East outside of the military sphere, and even what Israel could learn from South Africa in terms of reconciliation across racial and other lines.

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Israeli Forces Fires Flares Over Lebanon
By Ali Diab
13 Jul 2014

June 13, 2014
Tyre, Lebanon

Israeli forces fired flares over Lebanese southern towns of Tyre, Lebanon.
Unidentified men fired rockets late on Saturday June 12 towards Israel from al-Qlayleh, south of Tyre in southern Lebanon. The Lebanese Army have arrested a suspect.