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F01A5045
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5189
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5116
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5207
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show how people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances 1

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F01A5284
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5241
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5053
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5120
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5050
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5083
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5233
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5244
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5108
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5318
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5056
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5166
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5261
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5091
Eskikışla Mahallesi, Unnamed Road, 06860 Haymana/Ankara,Turkey
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5306
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5118
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5277
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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F01A5106
Unnamed Road, Damascus,Syria
By QUSAY NOOR
18 Jan 2018

Rainfall in the eastern Ghouta in the town of Ein Tirma and show ho6w people suffer in the winter and how they spend their day bringing in firewood, water and food in all their circumstances

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The Gaza Strip, Palestine: General Fo...
Gaza
By Hind Khoudary
02 Oct 2017

The Gaza Strip is a densely populated and impoverished region inhabited primarily by Palestinian refugees; the majority live in large, overcrowded refugee camps.

Gaza Strip has been under a tight Israeli blockade for more than 11 years now. 2 million Palestinians in the coastal sliver are living in an open air jail. 

The Israeli occupation and blockade have a lot of effects on the economic and socioeconomic conditions in Gaza. 

This collection will gather different footage about Gaza Strip, the sea, people, markets, and neighborhoods. 

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Sample media
Factories Are Out of Service in Besie...
Gaza
By ramzi
30 May 2016

May 30, 2016
Gaza, Palestine

80% of factories in Gaza are out of service because of the ongoing siege imposed on the city by the Israelis.

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Aid for Besieged Syrian Town
Rastan
By TTM Contributor 8
21 Apr 2016

A large truck convoy has delivered humanitarian aid supplies to the Syrian opposition-held town of Rastan under siege in central Homs Province. The 65 truck convoy is sponsored by the UN, The International Committee of the Red Cross and and the Syrian Arab Red Crescent.
The ICRC says the convoy is the first to reach Rastan in over a year.
The supplies include food, medicine and medical equipment, electricity generators and water treatment materials.
Opposition officials say Syrian regime forces did not allow a large portion of the medical supplies including medications and vaccines mainly for children.
The town, which has been under siege for three years, has seen its population double to 120-thousand because of people fleeing fighting in the region.

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Syria: Battling Cancer in Besieged Gh...
Eastern Ghouta
By Jawad Arbini
10 Jun 2015

10 year old Ammar suffers from neuroblastoma, a rare type of childhood cancer that develops in infants and young children. Ammar lives with his family in the opposition-held area of Douma, in Eastern Ghouta. The residents of Eastern Ghouta have been surviving under extremely hard living conditions due to the ongoing siege imposed by the Assad regime's forces over the past two years.

In Dar al-Rahma, the only active cancer center operating in Eastern Ghouta, Dr. Wissam says that Ammar suffered sever emotional trauma, which was the primary cause of his neuroblastoma.

Ammar’s mother remembers when, nearly 3 years ago, heavy clashes and shelling erupted in the neighborhood where they reside. The clashes lasted for three hours and severely terrified Ammar. Since then the boy had suffered from fever and continuous sickness.

Dr. Wissam also stressed that with very little resources, Dar al-Rahma center is currently treating about 600 patients suffering from different types of cancer with an 11% death-rate.

Unfortunately, Transterra Media received a message on the night of Saturday, June 13, 2015 announcing the death of Ammar.

Transcription:

  • (02:27) Um Ammar, Ammar’s mother (woman, Arabic):

Ammar was sitting at the balcony when shelling and clashes erupted, he was extremely terrified, since then he suffered from continuous fever and sickness. We took him to the doctor who examined him and found out that he has neuroblastoma. It’s a rare disease that infects one out of every 10,00 children, and the reason is emotional trauma. (02:50)

(02:51) Given that the area is besieged, how are you receiving Ammar’s medications? (02:58)

(02:58) The doctor gets part of them, but we were responsible to get the rest. There are also some medical tests that the doctor asks us to do, but we cannot send it for analysis in Damascus. This is an additional reason why his situation is relapsing, not being able to deliver the medical tests to Damascus. This made his recovery take more time. This led [Ammar] to loose his sight. We are hoping, but we don’t think he could get any better now (03:38).

(03:40) Under the siege, should Ammar follow a specific diet program? (03:45).

(03:46) The doctor says that half of the treatment is done through his diet program. Alhamdulillah we are doing all what we can. We cannot do anything more. Yes, he should follow a specific diet program, unlike other children (04:02).

  • Doctor Wissam, Doctor specialized in cancer diseases (woman, Arabic):

(04:24) At first, Ammar was diagnosed after he was suffered from a shock. He suffered from continuous sweating and fever, and he was later diagnosed with neuroblastoma. He started with this treatment and then had to stop it at the (name of the previous hospital) where he had already started the treatment, and came to continue the treatment here. When he got here, he was already in the recovery stage, but unfortunately, within two months, his situation relapsed dramatically due to a psychological trauma. We had to start a new treatment phase. One of the reasons why his treatment was delayed was the lack of the MRI Scanners. In addition of the lack of the medications, either because a delay in the supply or because of the hard situation to get the medications in Ghouta, we are trying at the moment to stay in contact with international organizations such as the Red Crescent or other organizations responsible for swelling diseases, perhaps Ammar has any chance [by getting the medications inside Ghouta]. (05:32).

(05:33) What are the efforts that this medical centre is doing under the siege? (05:40).

(05:41) At the moment we have more than 600 persons who are documented of having swelling diseases that are under treatment, and a percentage of 30% of recovery, and 10.5% of deaths. We are trying to give them the medications as much as possible, but we are facing some difficulties in doing so. The besiege and the diet factor are playing a negative role in the process, because it is known that the cancer patient needs a specific food diet program so that his body can bear the medications he is receiving. In addition of course to the negative psychological factor (06:22).

  • Heba, Nurse (woman, Arabic):

(08:16) Here’s a breast eradication with part of the other breast and some parts of the armpit.. we take samples of the armpit and sample of the breast to check how bad is the infection, we record it and we send it for the lab analysis.

  • Abu Khaled, Managing Director of Dar al-Rahma center (man, Arabic):

(08:29) Sometimes the patient comes and take the dose of the medications to make the swelling smaller. We are sometimes in need of a surgery, but unfortunately, most of the medical centers that do these surgeries stopped their operations. The reason is because their efforts are put only for the injured people. This reason sometimes plays a negative role in the recovery of the patients, because the patients who are not getting this surgery have their situation relapsed.

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'Ghouta Dry': Handmade Cola Under Siege
Misraba, Eastern Ghouta
By Jawad Arbini
24 May 2015

May 2015,
Misraba, Eastern Ghouta

Residents of the rebel-held town of Misraba in Eastern Ghouta, have created a factory to make soft drinks with little resources and very simple means.
The workers of the factory use alimentary acids and preservatives, which they find in pharmacies, and using a drill they mix the powder with water. Once the melange is ready, they fill it in second hand glass bottles.
It's been two years since Eastern Ghouta has been under a tight military siege imposed by the Assad regime forces and allies.

Transcription:

00:00 – 00:090
Hand-written sign in Arabic reads: “Local cola. Freedom tastes sweeter.”
03:38 – 03:41
Hand-written sign in Arabic reads: “Local cola. Freedom tastes sweeter.”
03:42 – 03:47
Hand-written sign in Arabic reads:
“Creativity grows as the siege becomes stricter. Ghouta Dry is the beverage of the siege. Cheers, young men of Ghouta.” SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Saeed al-Khawly, Factory Manager
04:41 – 05:18
“In the name of God, the merciful the compassionate; Given the suffocating siege and the very hot weather, we thought of creating any project that could alleviate [the impact of] the siege on people in Ghouta. We thought about it and found that the best thing to do would be to start a cola factory – something to cool people in this very hot weather.
Thanks be to God, we managed to start a cola factory in Ghouta with the simplest means.”
05:19 – 05:48
Q: Do the substances you are using have any effect on consumers’ health?
A: No, thanks be to God. We are using preservatives and some acids that are available in pharmacies; they are alimentary acids, not chemical ones. They [the acids] are used in food substances. The added preservatives make the beverage consumable for six months.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Abdu, Street Vendor
05:49 – 06:08
“Customers say it is very good and it is delivered to me. I am selling about 300 to 400 bottles a day. We offer them cold to customers. They are enjoying the beverage and quenching their thirst. It is hot in Ghouta and we are under siege. This is very good.”

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Ingenious Invention in Besieged Easte...
Douma, Eastern Ghouta, Syria
By Jawad Arbini
12 May 2015

May 13, 2015
Eastern Ghouta, Syria

Two years of being under siege has forced the citizens of Eastern Ghouta, near Damascus, to come up with ingenious inventions in order to survive.
This video shot in Douma, shows a heater invented by 60 year old Abu Yassin that uses solar energy to boil water.

Abu Yassin previously worked as a glazier but his business has dropped since the 2011 uprising. Nowadays he is using the glass and an unused satellite dish to build a solar concentration heater.

Using small pieces of glass and mirrors glued to the surface of the satellite dish, Abu Yassin directs the dish to face the sunlight which is reflected by the mirrors to hit the kettle or the cooking pot that sits in a basket in front of the dish.

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Yassin

03:32- 06:03

Q: How did you come up with the idea of making a solar cooker?
A: After the siege, we started to look for ways to substitute gas. I saw this on the internet but nobody had applied it. I tried it and we found out that it was excellent. We tried it and it worked.
We used it to heat water and cook. People started demanding it. When we showed it, it was in high demand. People started to bring small pieces of mirrors that they had at home, and I showed them how to cut them, paste them together and place a basket. There is high demand for this.

04:17
Q: How do you make the solar cooker? How does it work?
A: The mirrors are cut in squares so that they would have similar shape and they are glued to the satellite dish using silicon or al-Shuala glue. Then you need to put thick metal bars to hold the cooking pot. This is it. It is simple.

04:43
Q: Let us talk about how long it takes to cook something. What have you cooked with it?
A: We have cooked everything; all dishes. There is not anything that we did not cook with this. It takes about half an hour to cook something. It is the same time it takes to cook something using a gas cooker.
Q: What did you cook?
A: We cooked fava beans with rice, pees with rice, mujaddara [a dish prepared with lentils]; all dishes. There is not anything that we did not cook with this.

05:13
Q: Tell us how your idea became a commercial project. How many clients were able to use this invention?
A: When I made this people clients started to tell their relatives or others who have seen it and I started to receive more customers through them. So far I made 20 or 25 dishes.
Of course, this helps to break the siege; you can use something instead of gas by employing simple tools. Anyone who has mirrors we cut them for him. It does not cost anything. The cost is very low and usually people would have a satellite dish. The customer brings the satellite dish and the mirrors. I only charge for cutting, which is not expensive.”

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Syrian Soldiers Surrounded by Nusra F...
Jisr al-Shughour, Syria
By TTM Contributor 6
11 May 2015

Jisr al-Shughour, Syria
May 11, 2015

More than 200 Syrian government fighters, possibly including high ranking officers, are believed to have been besieged in the government hospital complex in the town of Jisr al-Shughour for more than two weeks. This is one of the few locations where Syrian regime forces still exist in Idlib province. Syrian government forces have failed to break the siege despite several airstrikes and ground operations.

This video offers an inside look at positions held by the Nusra Front within the wrecked hospital complex, which has become a battlefield. Rebel fighters control three of the hospital's four main buildings.

Rebel military commanders speculated in interviews that high ranking Syrian, Iranian and Russian military officers, as well as the governor of Idlib might be caught in the remaining building.

SHOTLIST

Wide of building where Syrian government troops are hiding

Medium of Nusra Front fighter behind sandbags

Close-up of rifle tip

Various inside blood bank building held by Nusra Front

Various of destroyed buildings

Various inside the blood bank building

Wide of building held by regime forces

Various of Nusra Front fighters

Interview with Abu Zain al-Abidin, Nusra Front commander

Various of Abu Zain al-Abdidin with other Nusra Front fighters

Interview with unnamed Nusra Front fighter

Various of a room that was used as a detention center by regime forces

Interview with unnamed Nusra Front fighter

Close-up of graffiti written by regime fighters

Various of Nusra Front fighters attempting to approach regime-held building

Various of wrecked cars and killed regime fighters’ corpses

Medium of tank

Interview with Abu Omar al-Zaybaq, a Nusra Front commander

Various of regime-held building

Close-up of empty bullet casings

Various of Nusra Front fighters shooting at regime-held building

Wide of regime-held building

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Man, Arabic) Abu Zain al-Abidin , Nusra Front Commander
(02:10 – 03:53)

02:10
“In the name of God, peace be upon God’s Messenger, and thanks be to God. We are inside Jisr al-Shughour Hospital. Over there is the hospital’s main gate; here is the external clinics building behind me. This is the external clinics building. We are now in the hospital’s surrounding.
Q: We heard that high ranking officers from regime forces are inside the hospital. What kind of information do you have about this? And what is the approximate number of people inside the hospital, which you are now besieging?
A: The estimated number of people is 250. There might be high ranking personalities or the governor [of Idlib province]. There might be important personalities.
Q: In reaction, what did the regime do to break the siege and how did you manage to push back the regime forces?
A: It [the regime] is using all sorts of weapons, such as warplanes; it is trying with all sorts of weapons, but, thanks be to God, we are prepared to confront it. We shall retaliate with sophisticated and modern means. The regime will witness surprises in the next few hours.

03:26
We enforced a security perimeter with a radius of about five to six km and they could not withdraw. If they were able to withdraw they would have done it. Some of them withdrew but the others could not.
Our attack, thanks be to God, was very fast and we were able to enforce the siege unexpectedly. The perimeter we enforced on them was large. They were not able to withdraw. If they could withdraw they would have done it.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Nusra Front Fighter
04:17 – 04:53
“We are now at the external clinics building in the National Hospital of Jisr al-Shughour. The infidel enemy is located in that building, which is a few meters away. We are now closing down on them with the help of God Almighty.
God willing, we will storm the building with explosive-rigged cars the likes of which the regime has not seen.
The men we have brought to fight you love death as much as you love life. We have brought migrant as well as local fighters. Thanks be to God.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Nusra Front Fighter
(05:17 – 05:54) “This is not a prison. This is supposed to be a hospital. However, God’s enemy turned this into a cell to detain Muslims. Unfortunately, look how Muslims draw on the walls. May God help us. [UNINTELLIGIBLE] Prisoners had no knives or weapons and were placed in the second floor underground. May God help us; may God help us. God willing, we have come to cut your throats.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Omar al-Zaybaq
(07:26 – 08:40)

07:26
“In the name of God, In the course of the hospital battle, thank be to God we are besieging [regime members] from all sides. Thanks be to God, we have controlled the three [main] buildings. There are one more building and the basement left.
God willing, we will soon be inside the basement where Assad’s gangs are located, which is where secrets are kept.

08:01
Q: What are these secrets? What is it that enabled people besieged in a single building to hold on?
A: God knows better, but it is said that the regime is so ferocious in trying to keep this hospital. God knows better, there might be high ranking officers, who could be Iranians or Russians. There could also be chemical weapons.
In the next few days we will bring you new information.”

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Remembering the Vukovar Massacres
Vukovar, Croatia
By danubestory
03 Feb 2015

During the war for the former Yugoslavia, the town of Vukovar was among the most devastated by fighting between Serbian and Croatian forces. Houses bear clear signs of the fierce shelling that took place, and the town’s now bullet hole-ridden water tower rests as a reminder of the siege and the cruel fate that befell the town and its citizens until now. The battle of Vukovar lasted for 87 days, during which many people were stuck in the town, finding refuge in cellars or public bomb shelters that also hosted makeshift hospitals. After entering the city, Serbian troops were alleged to have taken civilians and wounded soldiers from these hospitals into the Ovčara farm where they massacred them.

Today, Vukovar remains a divided town. War crimes committed there remain unsolved and the people who committed them, unpunished. Steve Gaunt, a former Croat mercenary who took part in the fight for Vukovar, now works as a historian and explorer for the local museum. He talks of his experience of the war, of Vukovar's troubled present, and of the struggle for normality faced by people who still live side-by-side with those they used to fight.

On February 4, 2015, the International Court of Justice dismissed claims of genocide committed by Serbia and Croatia during the Yugoslav war, that took hundreds of thousands of lives in the early-1990s. The court cited a lack of evidence that the massacres constituted genocide - a difficult claim to prove because the prosecution must be able to prove the intentions of the perpetrators.

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Waiting Out the Siege: Kobane Refugee...
Seher Sokak No:34, 63800 Suruç/Şanlıurfa,Turkey
By Antoine E. R. Delaunay
02 Feb 2015

A photo reportage, realized at the end of November 2014, illustrating the challenging situation faced in the Kurdish city of Suruç and its region overwhelmed by Syrian refugees. Heavy fighting between Kurdish forces and Daesh have been raging inside the city of Kobane, located only a few kilometers away on the other side of the Turkish-Syrian border, for more than three months at that time.

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Dreadful Disease Appears in Eastern G...
Ghouta
By Mohamad al-jazaare
24 Dec 2014

Hamourieh, Eastern Ghouta, Syria

Harsh humanitarian conditions in besieged Eastern Ghouta near Damascus have caused a rare, grisly disease surface. Young Hiba is being treated from myiasis, a skin infestation caused fly maggots.

Staff at the local Dar al-Rahma Medical Center (DRMC) are doing their best to offer Hiba and other patients proper care, despite the severe shortage of medical supplies in Eastern Ghouta.

The center is also treating many patients from cancer. Tasneem is a five-year-old girl who is diagnosed with leukemia. DRMC’s director Dr. Wissam says that she and her colleagues face a large difficulty in providing cancer medications that will not expire soon.

Shot List

1 Various of Dr. Wissam picking worms out of Hiba (young girl)’s scalp.

Natural Sound (Arabic, Woman and man) conversation between Dr. Wissam, Director of Dar al-Rahma Medical Center and Hiba’s father

Dr. Wissam: “These are pouches. If we do not clean them they might be hiding something bigger. I do not like this area. They should not have remained.”

Father: “Her mother is giving her a shower every day.”

Dr. Wissam: “There is a lack of education and awareness (…). These remaining pouches will not help me. I wanted to see her in two days but I do not want to see anything like this.”

2 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Dr. Wissam, Director of Dar al-Rahma Medical Center

(01:12) “Hiba’s case is the first case of miyasis that we diagnosed in Eastern Ghouta. Her scalp is infected. Such diseases are due to the lack of pesticides, which causes the appearance of large houseflies. In addition to that, these diseases are caused by the lack of water in the area.” (01:29)

(01:29) “At the moment, the girl’s condition has improved, and she is healing and under medical observation. We hope not to discover new cases.” (01:35)

3 Wide of Dr. Wissam, Hiba and Hiba’s father at the medical center.

Natural Sound

Dr. Wissam: “This is why she was in pain and could not sleep. After they [the worms] were taken out, she felt better. She has not been complaining of any pain.”

Father: “Not at all.”

Dr. Wissam: “We will only observe her. If anything appears, we will see it immediately. I do not want to cut her [scalp].”

4 SOUNDBITE (Man, Arabic) Ahmad, Hiba’s Father and an unidentified woman

(02:26) “It all started a week ago, and we thought it was an allergy. I took her to the medical dispensary where they prescribed her a medication and ointments. I then took her to another dispensary in Harasta where they told me it was probably impetigo [a skin disease] and they prescribed her an ointment. But my daughter was in a lot of pain, and I thought it does not look like a normal allergy. So I brought her here after her situation got worse and she was in pain at night. We feared that she might had a malignant disease. When we discovered that she had worms in her head, we directly thought that this was not normal. We brought her here.” (03:16)

5 Close up of Dr. Wissam taking worms out of Hiba’s scalp.

Natural Sound (Arabic) Conversation among

Dr. Wissam: “Do we have tweezers? [UNINTELLIGIBLE] Do you know blue flies? These are blue flies’ eggs.”

Father: “What about this?”

Dr. Wissam: “You have to shave her head, brother. Alright?”

Father: “Yes”

Dr. Wissam: “Because they are hiding in the hair. If there is anything that has not come out…”

Unseen woman: “How could they say it is normal and the girl was not hit by a bullet or did cut her head?”

Father: “They diagnosed it as impetigo.”

Unseen woman: “When did this start, doctor?

Doctor Wissam: “Three days ago.”

Father: “Three days ago, she started having a headache.”

Unseen woman:”How did this decay happen?”

Dr. Wissam: “It started before.”

Father: “Her face and neck were swollen.”

Unseen woman: “How did the fly lay its eggs here?”

Dr. Wissam: “Only God knows. One, two, three, four, five, six – six worms from a single spot. I once received a patient whose eye was eaten [by worms].”

6 Various of street. Natural Sound: (Arabic) Call for prayer.

7 Various of Tasneem, young girl in hospital bed

8 Various of Doctor Wissam injecting needle in Tasneem. Natural Sound: “Give me your hand.”

9 Close up of serum dripping

10 Various of Tasneem in hospital bed.

11 Various of Doctor Wissam injecting needle in Tasneem.

Natural Sound: Tasneem crying, Doctor saying to her: “We will only remove this. It is over. We removed it. It is over. It is over. There is nothing.”

12 SOUNDBITE (Woman, Arabic) Dr. Wissam, Director of Dar al-Rahma Medical Center

(09:20) Tasneem is a young girl aged five; she suffers from severe lymphocytic inflammation after her father was martyred. She is currently under treatment, but we are facing obstacles in supplying medicaments that have long shelf lives due to the siege on Ghouta (09:35).

(09:35) “Tasneem is not the only child who suffers from this disease. The number of children diagnosed with such diseases increased lately, due to the conditions under the siege on Ghouta. [Inadequate] nutrition or environment, as well as psychological factors largely increase the rate of these diseases.” (09:52)

13 Various of petri dish preparation

14 SOUNDBITE (Woman, Arabic) Um Imad, Tasneem’s grandmother

(10:17) Tanseem has had leukaemia for almost two years. She was treated in Damascus first, but due to circumstances we could no longer go there, I mean because of the siege. Two months ago, the condition resurfaced and we came to this center where she is being treated, thanks be to God. I wish that God rewards them [medical center workers] well (10:46)

15 Various of Tasneem walking

16 SOUNDBITE (Girl, Arabic) Tanseem, girl suffering from cancer

(11:08) My name is Tasneem. I wake up every morning, I go to school and then I play with Toufic. My grandmother then takes me to the office [clinic]; they insert a needle into my vein [UNINTELLIGIBLE].

17 Wide of Tasneem playing with other children.

18 SOUNDBITE (Girl, Arabic) Tanseem, girl suffering from cancer

(11:40) “Here is my father’s photo. He was going to Dukhanya [town in Eastern Ghouta] when he was shot by a sniper and martyred.”

“This is my cousin, I always play with her. And this is Toufic, he is older than I am. He always plays with me. This is Mohammad, my younger brother. He does not give his mother a hard time.”

“Bye.”

19 Various of decomposing cattle carcasses

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Under Siege: Ghouta Residents Struggl...
Eastern Ghouta
By TTM Contributor 6
08 Dec 2014

Eastern Ghouta, Syria
December 2014

The rebel-held Eastern Ghouta area near Damascus has been under a strict siege for more than two years. Government forces have banned almost every food item from entering the area.
This video shows local residents’ suffering in trying to provide their daily food.
People complain that bread has become unaffordable. To make sandwiches, they have to replace this staple food with other substances such as leafy vegetables or an apricot confection known as qamareddine, which is available for less than half the price of bread.

Shot List
1. M/S of street and men walking
2. C/S of vegetables and food
3. M/S of vegetables and food
4. C/S of bread with price (650 Syrian pounds per Kg)
5. M/S of child eating
6. M/S of child walking
7. C/S of men paying/purchasing
8. C/S of man cutting and weighing qamareddine (apricot confection)
9. C/S of child eating
10. Various of people packing and delivering qamareddine
11. W/S of streets
12. Various of people selling vegetables

13 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Abu Ahmad
(07:22) The price of bread is high now, around 650 or 700 Syrian pounds [per kilogram], so people decided to buy more vegetables. No one can afford the high prices now. People cannot even find work for 100 pounds, so they cannot pay 700 pounds for bread.
People are forced to go groves to pick mallows, chard and spinach to wrap olives with them for dinner – this is the the food that we can have.

Some people just boil spinach, add some oil to it and eat it without any eggs or meat.
This is all due to the siege the regime is imposing on us. God damn this regime, which is unjust to more than a million people in Eastern Ghouta. People are starving to death. Let have some mercy on us, God damn them! What can I say?

We are buying this [pack of apricot confection] for 200 Syrian pounds. We are wrapping cheese sandwiches for our kids with this.
We demand the nations who have a humanity and ethics to have compassion for kids and women, who are begging – when did our women and children ever beg? This is [our] reality life here, what else can I say (08:59).

14 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Abu Mahrous
(09:00) Due to siege the regime is imposing on us, people tend to buy more vegetables now. We used to get rice, lentils and bulgar wheat from the camp, but their prices increased. For example, bulgar wheat is now 1,200 pounds [per kilogram] – bread costs around 700 pounds a kilogram. People are forced to buy chards and qamareddine. Bashar [al-Assad] and his aides and followers think they can besiege Ghouta, but God willing, we will remain strong, Ghouta is the land of wealth. We have enough lands to grow the food we need needs, and God will abandon us. After patience comes ease. God willing, we shall be victorious (10:09).

15 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Adnan Al Yafi

(10:10) People tend to buy more vegetables because one kilogram of bulgar costs 1700 pounds, and the same goes lentils and rice. The prices of basic supplies ingredients we use in our dishes went up and – what is worse – some of them are no longer available due to the siege. Could you imagine the price of the bread is more than 700 pounds [per kilogram], if you were lucky to find bread. But, thanks be to God, we are fine, even if we are using cabbage or chards instead of bread to make sandwiches and we are growing our own plants now to fulfill our daily needs. We have been besieged for three years now and nobody cares about us. But, thanks be to God, we are doing fine, despite the siege and the inflation we are facing. We hope for better days to come. Imagine that the cabbage and other vegetable leaves are primary ingredients for our dishes now to survive (11:50).

16 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Abboud Al Arbini
(11:51): Two months ago, the roads were open blocked and it was much easier to deliver of all the products, so their prices were lower than now; sugar, rice, and everything else was cheaper than it is now. Now, as roads are blocked roads, the delivery of these products is harder, so their prices have gone up. Sugar now costs 2500 to 2800 pounds per kilogram, and a kilogram of rice costs 3,000 pounds 2,800 or 2,500 – it is sold for different prices. Now people are eating more qamareddine since it contains sugar, which the body requires. Other than qamareddine, people are eating vegetables such as chards because they are available in Ghouta. People have been unemployed for more than three years, so they need something cheap to eat. Chards or qamareddine are cheap and available in Ghouta (12:56).

(12:57) Flour used to cost 2,500 per kilogram, wheat cost 1000 pounds per kilogram and barley 700 pounds. With priuce hikes, people decided to buy qamareddine since it is cheaper. They are using qamareddine, chard or cabbage instead of bread to make sandwiches. Thanks be to God, we are able to grow these in Ghouta. God is merciful (13:43).

17 SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man), Mohammad al-Qadi
(13:44) Due to the siege that is imposed on us and lack of basic ingredients to make bread, like flour, the price of bread has gone up to 700 pounds [per kilogram]. Who could afford it now? We have been under siege for three years now, unemployed, so we cannot afford to buy expensive food for our families. Most of the people tend to buy more vegetables since we can grow them in Ghouta, despite the siege and the price hike. God is granting us life, not Bashar al-Assad.

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Gazans Use Propane to Fuel Cars (Shor...
Gaza
By Yasser Abu Wazna
05 Nov 2014

Gaza, Palestinian Territories
November 4, 2014

The ongoing Israeli blockade on the Gaza Strip and the recent closure of most the tunnels used for smuggling goods from Egypt has led to a severe fuel shortage. As a result, some Gazans are modifying their car engines and generators to make them run on propane instead of gasoline. Propane is widely used for cooking in Gaza.

Shot list:

00:00 – 00:05
A general shot shows cars driving in both directions on a main road in Gaza City.

00:06 – 00:11
A close shot shows the exhaust pipe of a taxi as it drives away.

00:12 – 00:18
A medium shot shows many parked taxis and men standing and chatting; a female passenger gets out of one of them.

00:19 – 00:20
A medium shot shows a street-food shop.

00:21 – 00:27
A medium shot shows the same street-food shop from a different angle.

00:31- 0:34
A medium shot shows an electric generator running and connected to a gas canister.

00:35 – 01:01
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic/ interview transcript below

01:02 – 01:07
A medium shot shows Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner at work.

01:08- 01:10
A wide shot shows the façade of Daban Company for gas supply.

01:11- 00:14 A medium shot shows two men standing and another around gas canisters.

00:14 – 00:19
A pan right movement shows a man carrying a gas canister.

00: 20 – 00:34
Traveling shot from inside a taxi shows the car stopping to pick up a female passenger.

00:35-01:53
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver/ interview transcript below

01:54 – 02:06
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic/ interview transcript below

02:07 – 02:40
Interview with Ayman Seidam, a mechanic, Arabic/ interview transcript below

02:41- 03:35
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan/ interview transcript below

Interviews

00:35 – 01:01
Interview with Ahmad Abu al-Anzi, a male curtain store owner, Arabic
“Because of the gasoline shortage, you have to use propane to fuel electric generators and carry on with your work… There are power shortages that could last from six to seven hours and the power is on during the night while you cannot work. You have to use any alternative kind of fuel to keep working.”

00:35-01:53
Interview with Mustafa Eid, male taxi driver
“I altered the car because of the gasoline shortage... In the past, we used to get gasoline through tunnels from Egypt, but they were closed about a year ago, so we switched to propane to save money.”

01:54 – 02:06
Interview with Haneen Abu Medean, a female passenger, Arabic

-Do you know that this car is running on gas?

-Yes, I know.

-What do you think of that?

-This is normal, because there is no gasoline but [propane] is available.

02:07 – 02:40
Interview with Ayman Seidam, a mechanic, Arabic
“I am disconnecting the filter because I want to set the propane machine. It is not working properly. The propane machine does not change the engine; it only stops the flow of gasoline. Gasoline is expensive here, so people have to switch to using propane. We install a small device to pump propane instead of gasoline into the engine using the injection system. “This is the propane device. It is made in Turkey and called Fima.”

02:41- 03:35
Interview with the spokesman of the Ministry of Transportation Khalil Mosbah al-Zayyan, Arabic
“Altering taxis to make them run on propane is against the law, but due to the siege on the Gaza Strip and the large assault against the Palestinian people that comes with it, many taxi drivers are customizing their cars to make them run on propane. It is against the law and the ministry of transportation does allow the installation of propane pipes in cars because it is dangerous… for the passengers. The ministry of transportation, in cooperation with the traffic police, is trying to resolve this problem by monitoring people who buy propane pipes [used in altering vehicles].

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Tank Battle in Aleppo
Aleppo
By mustafa sultan
30 Oct 2014

October 26-31, 2014
Aleppo, Syria

Intense combat footage shows Islamic Front and Free Syrian Army forces battling the Syrian Army in Aleppo using captured tanks. The Islamic Front and the FSA are the primary factions in control of rebel held Aleppo, including key parts of the battered old city.

Translation:

"We have been in this Mosque for over a year and it is very precious to us as it is one of the great Islamic sites. We are defending it against the horrible regime [of Bashar al-Assad] that shells and bombs without considering the people or the religious sites. We are still defending our city. We follow orders to take down the regime and the president, and then liberate ourselves. We are still hanging on, trying to maintain what is left of Aleppo. With God's help, we will hopefully be liberated from this regime."

Shots List:

Shot 1: Fighters from the FSA and the Islamic Front defending an attack by the regime at the frontline of Sifat
Shot 2: Clashes between the regime and the rebels in Handarat
Shot 3: Clashes between the rebels and the regime
Shot 4: Shot of the Citadel of Aleppo, that is under the control of the regime
Shot 5: Military group commander in the old town of Aleppo and the guard of the Ummayad Mosque in Aleppo

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Destruction and Soup Kitchens: Daily ...
Aleppo
By mustafa sultan
28 Oct 2014

October 26-31, 2014
Aleppo (Opposition Held), Syria

As the war in Syria continues, civilians in Aleppo, the country's largest city, focus on daily survival. Children wait in lines at public soup kitchens, a man draws water from a broken water main in a bomb crater, and shops are open for business amidst the rubble.

Shots List:

Shot 1: Sunset over the neighbourhoods in Aleppo under the control of the regime
Shot 2: Children: Daily life in the neighbourhood of Al Chaar (under the control of the rebels)
Shot 3: Daily life in Al Chaar neighbourhood
Shot 4: Water shortage crisis in the neighbourhoods of old Aleppo, under the control of the rebels
Shot 5: Workers trying to bring back the electricity in the neighbourhoods of Al Chaar, Salah Ed Din and other old neighbourhoods
Shot 6: NGOs giving food for the families in the neighbourhoods of the old city of Aleppo
Shot 7: The destruction in Al Maadi neighbourhood after being hit with barrels
Shot 8: Life in the markets of Aleppo

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Inside Kobane (Video)
Kobane
By Shirwan Qasim
27 Oct 2014

Kobane, Syria

This video shows the destruction inside Kobane after weeks of ISIS siege. Conditions in the city are dire as medications are not available. All Kurdish fighters in the city are volunteers. This footage was shot on Kobane's eastern front, approximately 400 meters from the nearest ISIS position.

Male YPG Fighter:

"Nobody can beat the Kurdish population. I want to ensure the Kurds that no power can take Kobane, or evict us from Kobane. We will not allow anyone to enter our land. If we lose our land, we lose our dignity and honor."

Injured Child:

"ISIS have attacked us from the telecommunication tower. My mother and I were going to get water, and we were attacked by snipers."

A female fighter from the women protection unit of the YPG:

"I joined the women protection unit to protect my people and my country."

"The criminals who are attacking our homes, our children, and our siblings have taken everything in the city and left nothing for us. I ask all the men who left the city to return to it and defend it. I invite them to carry their weapons because each and every one of us is entitled to do something for Kobane."

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Inside the Last Rebel Bastion of Homs
Homs, Syria
By Mohannad
27 Oct 2014

Hay al-Waer, Homs, Syria
October 27, 2014

Children and adults in the besieged suburb of Hay al-Waer, one of the last neighborhoods in Homs to remain under opposition control, show their defiance in the face of aerial bombardment and deprivation. Children hold signs sending messages of peace to the world and adults express their frustration at what they feel is their abandonment at the hands of the international community. Their messages emphasize a disdain for violence and the desire for education and a better, more peaceful world.

Shot List:

00:00 – 00:06
Pan left movement shows two young girls running around near partially destroyed houses.

00:07 – 00:12

Medium shot shows the same girls playing with a cat.

00:13— 00:47

A small number of civilians stand on both sides of the road. Children wearing colored paper hats hold cardboard banners.

The banners, written in Arabic, read:

“The Civil Assembly in Homs – the Administrative Committee; Freedom Race; Hay al-Waer.” “UN Security Council Resolution 2153 ?????” “Our children are without shelter, without protection.” “Together we build international civilization” (written in English). “For the price of a rocket, build a school, a hospital or an orphanage.”

00:33 – 01:46

More young children stand on the roadside holding protest banners. The banners read:

“We are being killed with the weapons of the regime, 'Halesh' [a derogatory term for Hezbollah that echoes Daesh, the Arabic acronym for ISIS] and the [US-lead international] coalition.”

“In our concentration camp, we love life.”

“We still stand together, we get our freedom” (written in English).

“For the price of a bullet, buy a pen.”

“Our children are the children of humanity – don’t forget” (written in English).

02:22 – 02:47

Pan right movement shows partially destroyed buildings in the distance.

03:21 – 03:32
Pan right movement inside a house shows heavy destruction. Rubble and wrecked furniture cover the floor.

03:33 – 03:46
Pan right movement inside a house shows a hole in the wall and torn curtains.

Interviews

00:48 – 01:32 (Two men, Arabic):

“This is where the airplane bombed this morning. This building is full of civilians, from top to bottom. They are all refugees.

Look at the rabbits – even rabbits were not safe from Bashar al-Assad! He killed them all.”

The same man holds dead rabbits by the ears, saying sarcastically:

“These were carrying weapons and standing on the frontline.”

Another man holds two other dead rabbits:

“Oh dear Lord! This is a mother and her offspring.”

He goes on, mocking the regime’s propaganda about fighters receiving aid from foreign countries:
“This one is from Qatar, and this one from Saudi Arabia – they sent them to us. Arab countries will also send us chicks, but they still haven’t arrived.”

The cameraman replies sarcastically: “The [rabbits’] mother is from Turkey.”

01:47 – 02:21 (Man, Arabic. Intermittent shelling can be heard in the background.)

“We have been under siege in Hay al-Waer for more than a year. The Prophet, peace be upon him, migrated only once. We migrated three times; the first time we left Khalidiya [a neighborhood in Homs], the second time we were displaced from al-Jazira al-Sabi’a and the third time from al-Jazira al-Sadisa after we were bombed by warplanes today.

We call upon Muslims – we call upon God first and then Muslims – and say that we are under siege here in Hay al-Waer. We do not have a grain of salt. You have to understand this – not even a grain of salt. We hope for help from God first and then Muslims.”

02:48 – 03:20 (Man, Arabic. A Heavily destroyed building can be seen in the background)

“We have been under siege for a year and a half. The Assad regime is following a policy of starvation and bombing that Israel uses. [The regime] is laying siege on the refugees in Hay al-Waer. It bombed us with explosive barrels and missiles. There is no doubt that [the regime] is implementing an Israeli policy. Israel used to bomb refugees in Gaza and other areas with explosive barrels. We are tired of calling upon the world to help us, because no one is doing anything for us.”

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Protecting an Ancient Damascus Synagogue
Damascus
By TTM Contributor 6
19 Sep 2014

September 19, 2014
al-Madares Street, Jobar, Damascus

Local citizens protect and maintain an ancient Jewish synagogue in the besieged Damascus suburb of Jobar, despite the heavy damage inflicted on it by heavy clashes between the FSA and Syrian Army. Located at the end of al-Madares street, the synagogue is believed to date from 720 BCE and was a temple for the prophet Khedr and prophet Elias.

The monument was largely neglected by the Syrian government before the war and has been damaged many times with mortars and bombs during the war. However, its local caretaker, and the inhabitants of the area continue to care for the building, as they have for decades.

Shot list:
Various shots show the location of the synagogue and the damage to the building.
Various shots show the remains of the synagogue, such as historical artifacts and some ancient writings
Various shots show an underground chamber that is said to have been used by prophet Khedr to pray
Various shots show the massive destruction that happened around the synagogue

Sound Bites:
Abu Loay, a member of the local committee of Jobar, interested in the issue of the synagogue, explains the story of the synagogue from its establishment to the present day.
(00:39)

Interviewer: How long have you had this job?

Abu Loay: We have been taking care of the synagogue for the past 2-3 years. There used to be a guard here, but he left after the problems started, and then the inhabitants of the area left, so we came here, the men and myself. We are taking care of it. The citizens and the elderly of this town asked us to stay here and guard the synagogue and until now, it has not been attacked.

Interviewer: How was the synagogue looking when you started working here?

Abu Loay: It was amazing, it had fence and it was an ancient historical monument, it goes back thousands of years.
Interviewer: Were there any Jews living in the area?

Abu Loay: Here in Jobar we did not have any Jews, but back in the days of our grandparents, we used to have Jews. When I was a child, I remember there was a big percentage of Jews in the Jewish street. They used to come every Saturday from the Jewish street to visit the synagogue here. When Israel was established, many of the Jews left, that was along time ago.

Interviewer: Were there huge numbers of Jews in Damascus?

Abu Loay: Yes of course, they all used to live in the Jewish street, an area named the Jewish street, in the old city of Damascus.

Interviewer: When did they leave and where did they go?

Abu Loay: Most of them went to Israel, the government back then gave them a choice, to either stay here or leave, and a lot of them chose to leave.

Interviewer: How was the synagogue destroyed?

Abu Loay: About two years ago, from the side of Harasta, they [Syrian Army] attacked us with the multiple rocket launcher. Over 15 shells were dropped at the same time. I took footage of the incident and then I tried [to expose the attack], I went to many media outlets, trying to call the Jews to come and protect the synagogue, but nobody responded. They [Syrian Army] hit the ceiling in two spots and the kitchen burnt down.

Interviewer: Why did you keep protecting the synagogue if the Jews themselves did not respond and did not come to protect it?

Abu Loay: First of all, the synagogue is located in my town, I am from Jobar. Secondly, it is a legacy, not only for the Jews, but also for us. It is a legacy for the citizens of Jobar. It is thousands of years old and it is as valuable as any church or mosque.

Interviewer: Being here in the synagogue, do you feel any attachment to this place?

Abu Loay: I swear I feel like it is my own home. I was sleeping right here, with my wife and children, and if I have to go somewhere I lock the place up. I was residing here for about six months.

Interviewer: How did you feel when the synagogue was attacked and destroyed?

Abu Loay: I felt like I lost a piece of my heart. Only someone who lives here will understand the true value of this synagogue.

Interviewer: Do you think there is a way to repair the synagogue?

Abu Loay: In this condition, all of this wreckage must be removed, they destroyed it. Go back to the old pictures of the synagogue and compare, it used to be heaven.

Interviewer: Do you speak Hebrew?

Abu Loay: No I only speak the language of Jobar.

Interviewer: Do you mind escorting us on a tour around the synagogue?

Abu Loay: Of course, I do not mind, let’s take the tour.
(04:28)

(04:33) Here there used to be the main door, and there, it used to be a kitchen. There is the room I used to sleep in.
This room was an office and I used to sleep in it. The women used to sleep upstairs, and this was a storage room. The main temple is in the back. This is the only tree that is still living.

(05:44) This is a new building, and there were rooms and the rooftop.
That used to be the entrance of the synagogue, and there use to be two rooms up there. And there was a water well.
Can you see this slot in the wall, they used to store the oil cans in their. Near the pile of rocks there used to be the alter. Those two chambers are completely destroyed.

(07:17) Look at the pigeon nest in the gap in the wall. That was here before the shelling.
This is an old school, and there used to be a wall here, the old school is for UNRWA [United Nations Relief and Works Agency].
There used to be a room, then a small hall and then another room, all ancient.
This carpet is from the remains of the temple, they used to love those colors, our brothers the Jews. This is another one, everything valuable we were able to find after the destruction, we removed it.

(08:39) Here used to be a huge bronze round plate, and here is the step of the prophet. Here they used to keep the oil, here they used to have books, and there was the seating area. The building was ancient and the temple had a very high ceiling.

(09:30) Here, where I am walking, used to be the few steps leading to the alter. Where I am standing now is the location of the alter. It was about half a circle and made out of wood and the chandeliers above it, it used to be amazing.

(10:20) Those gaps in the walls used to have frames, and here used to be a painting, and next to it a bronze box labeled "Charity".
And here, as we said before, they used to keep the oil.

(11:28) Here is the prayer chamber, our grandfathers used to say that the prophet Khedr used to come to pray here. This hole in the ceiling was an air vent for this chamber, but the shelling has destroyed most of the room.

(12:21) Look what the destruction did to it. The last time they dropped vacuum bombs on this area, the buildings around the synagogue were also destroyed.

(12:41) There used to be four candlesticks and a chair, an antique chair, they are not destroyed, we preserved them.

(13:05) This is the wreckage of the synagogue. They [Syrian Military] attacked us with many types of weapons, including jets. The last airstrike, they dropped vacuum bombs on us and destroyed all of the buildings.