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Asylum Seekers in Spain 20
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 May 2015

Yaya Ouahara (right) collects food distributed by the local NGO Bona Voluntat en Accio, in Barcelona, as part of the food support program to help migrants and people at risk of exclusion.
Yaya, 36, from Ivory Coast, arrived to Spain in 2009 by a small boat and after three years traveling through Africa. Yaya fled the civil war in his country and he recently got residence permit to stay in Spain permanently.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 21
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
20 May 2015

Yaya Ouahara (right) collects food distributed by the local NGO Bona Voluntat en Accio, in Barcelona, as part of the food support program to help migrants and people at risk of exclusion.
Yaya, 36 years old from Ivory Coast, arrived in Spain in 2009 by a small boat and after three years traveling through Africa. Yaya fled the civil war in his country and he recently got residence permit to stay in Spain permanently.

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InTheNameOfHaiti016.JPG
By Corentin Fohlen
16 Jul 2013

After the breakfast, volunteers sing and pray together at the guest house.

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By Corentin Fohlen
16 Jul 2013

Before leaving a place, volunteers sing and pray with the children of the neighborhood who spontaneously come to see the "white people". Here Dickinson is leading the prayer.

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HAITIhumanitaire001.JPG
By Corentin Fohlen
16 Jul 2013

Volunteers from Healing Haiti on their going to Cité-Soleil slum sing religious song like "Amazing Grace" or "God is so good" in a private "tap-tap", a traditional Haitian public transportation. This one is grills fitted, unlike the ones usually used by Haitians in Port-au-Prince.
At the end of the week, volunteers will sing it in Creole.

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By Corentin Fohlen
16 Jul 2013

This is the most miserable place of Cité-Soleil slum : it is used as wild toilets, and an Haitian guide says corpses are burnt here

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By Corentin Fohlen
06 Feb 2013

A team of volunteers just landed in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The two guides, both named Jenn, work with Healing Haiti, one of the hundreds of religious NGOs that organize weekly trips for volunteers looking to play the humanitarian worker.

Healing Haiti is an American christian organization created in 2006 by a couple, Jeff Gacek and Alyn Shannon. They decided to dedicate themselves to the country, in the name of God : "We didn’t choose Haiti ... God chose Haiti for us."

Hundreds of similar religious organizations have proliferated in Haiti since the 2010 earthquake. Every week, a team of ten volunteers land in Haiti. During a week, they participate in water distribution in the slum of Cité Soleil, they visit schools and orphanages where they distribute chewing-gum, and spend a day at the beach with some orphans. But they mainly hug children and take hundred of photos souvenir. Big international NGOs doing real humanitarian and development work criticize their approach, calling it "at best useless".

According to the US embassy in Port au Prince, 200 000 American citizens come to Haiti through similar trips each year.

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By Corentin Fohlen
25 Jan 2013

Volunteers take a photograph with a local woman. Hundreds of religious NGOs have flocked to Haiti since the 2010 earthquake. 200 000 American volunteers come to the country each year to "help" local populations. However, many international organizations like Doctors Without Borders say their work is useless and disempower local authorities.

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By Corentin Fohlen
18 Jan 2013

Volunteers help carrying buckets of water in Cité-Soleil slum in Port-au-Prince.