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Libyan refugees arriving in the port ...
Taranto, Italy
By Giuseppe Carucci Lightouch International.Inc
01 Apr 2011

The fighting between rebels and forces loyal to former Coronel Muammar Ghaddafi, forced thousands of refugees to flee Libya’s civil conflict by boat to Europe, and especially to Italy. In the southern city of Taranto, in the region of Puglia, the daily arrival of thousands of refugees coming illegally from Libya, placed the refugee issue as a primary concern for the italian Prime Minister of Italy, Senator Mario Monti. The picture shows a Libyan refugee emerging from the cruise ship in the port of Taranto.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Mohammad Ali is watering the little trees that are placed inside the enclosure. Every tree gets a couple of litres of water so it stays alive.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

A goat has been slaughtered and is waiting to be cut up, cooked and eaten for lunch.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Donkeys are the young shepherds' preferred transportation in the desert. Every day they lead the animals out towards food and water. The sun is coming down relentlessly and the heat is extreme even early in the day.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The young men from the surrounding Bedouin camps met up in the common “television lounge” which is a shed without windows. With one lamp hanging from the ceiling and a TV they spend the night together. The electricity they get from a solar panel, which a NGO built for them. Tonight they are watching a Turkish soap series translated into Arabic.
From left: Khaled, Awda, Ferhan, Suad, Mosa and Salem.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Hamida is the oldest Bedouin in and around Rashayida. The word is that she is 110 years old.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Taleb is laying on a couple of mattresses in a Bedouin camp in the desert. The Bedouins in this area have many children. A lot of men have two wives and upwards of twenty children.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Several of the men have gone out into the desert to check up on the animals. Afterwards they are resting, enjoying the wild nature, before returning back home.
From left: Salem, Mohammad, Saad, Salem, Yusef and Funkhor

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

A fire is lit for making tea. Drinking tea is an integrated part of being Bedouin.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

A traditional Bedouin meal consists of pieces of meat of goat or lamb put on top of a base of rice and bread and then poured over with warm water. The food is eaten by forming meat, rice and bread into a little ball, which you then shove into your mouth with your thumb.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The tank is the Bedouin's only way to get water when the rainwater cisterns are not filled.
The water they use for everything from cooking to feeding to the animals. The tanks are placed in the outskirts of the camps and then the water is filled into smaller containers and brought into the camp.
The water is being transported from the nearby desert village in a tractor. With the expenses of rental of a tractor, gas and the price of the water the total amount is circa 55 dollars and is a major part of the budget. In some periods it can be necessary to collect water as much as once a day.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Shepherd in the desert is resting while his livestock is making their way throught the desert.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The men do not work as much as the women. But they always handle the slaughtering of animals. The younger men are shepherds while the older men are the patriarchs of the family. They are in charge and are responsible for making sure that everything is being done according to plan.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Omar is trying to move the donkey. At the same time the donkey is drinking from a leak in a water pipe that connects the houses in Rashayida with water.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

The view from Mohammad’s house in Rashayida. He has a wife in the desert village and a wife out in the desert a few kilometres away. It is a part of ancient Bedouin culture to have more than one wife.
Najat, one of Mohammad’s many daughters, is playing in front of the house.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Up the hill behind the fence is a large manmade pool where the Bedouins lead the animals to drink water. It is built by YMCA and Dan Church Aid(NGO’s). It is projects like this that help the Bedouins maintain their ancient way of life in the desert.
The pool is built on the site for an ancient christian church several centuries old.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Bedouin in the desert, riding on his donkey and taking care of his animals.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Ferhan drinks from a rain water cistern. Even though the water is only for live stock due to parasites.

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After Water Comes Drought
rashayida, west bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Alia is helping the women clean out the enclosure for the goats. Everybody has to work, even the kids. The dust is everywhere while animal feces and dirt is put into large bags, bare handed.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West bank
By Andreas bro
28 Mar 2011

Empty containers in the desert. To be filled with water from a rainwater cistern.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
27 Mar 2011

Ferhan is a shepherd. Almost every day he takes the sheep out for as much as ten hours. He is resting before he rides on with the animals into the desert. The Bedouins have goats, Sheep and camels. The animals are their livelihood.

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After Water Comes Drought
Rashayida, West Bank
By Andreas bro
27 Mar 2011

Na’ma is making sure the sheep stays still while Sabha is milking it. The women in the Bedouin communities are in charge of almost all of the domestic duties. They prepare food, take care of the kids and milk the animals at the end of the day, when they get back from grazing in the desert.

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Khamis Special Forces كتيبة خميس [HQ]
Tripoli, Libya
By ttmlibya
21 Feb 2011

Each car is carrying four persons, each armed with an AK-47, and circulating around Tripoli and the nearby districts

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Occupation Has No Future
Israel
By upheavalproductions
18 Jan 2011

This film covers the character of Israeli occupation of Palestine. Documenting opinions not usually revealed from both Israelis and Palestinians. A behind the scenes look into how militarism and occupation is implemented in the mindsets of Israeli citizens at a young age. Powerful interviews with Israelis who were once soldiers that are now anti occupation and Palestinians who give personal accounts of life inside the occupation.

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Israel Barsuk
Brooklyn, NY
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
06 Dec 2010

Israel Barkuk is a Ukrainian WWII veteran who fought in the Red Army against the German army.

"My division was located on a plateau in central Ukraine, which was under German attack," he said. "They were just right below us and around us. A sniper killed my commander, so I was promoted the commanding commissar of a full battalion of 300 men."

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G20 Protests Seoul
Seoul, South Korea.
By Jeffrey Bright
11 Nov 2010

Riot police get crushed as demonstators march at The Korean People's G20 Response Action Rally and March G20 Protests. Seoul, South Korea. 11/11/2010

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THE MAN FROM HELMAND
Kandahar, Afghanistan
By The Journalist Connection
27 Oct 2010

KANDAHAR, AFGHANISTAN: After my English class, I waited for a friend outside the school. Suddenly a man with a big black beard, a big black turban, and typical countryside clothes approached me and asked for some money.

He scared the hell out of me because I was told by the school’s administration, and by the other teachers, that a group of Taliban had made it into Kandahar city.

Taliban suicide bombers frequently target English-language schools in order to close them, because the students who learn English often start working for the U.S. Army as interpreters.

I looked at the villager and told him that he was a strong man and that he should work to earn his money–not beg in the streets.

He looked into my eyes and smiled. “You’re right,” he said. “But look here.” He lifted up his shirt and I saw a wide and bloody wound. I really could not believe how many stitches were on his stomach. It was awful.

The man told me he was from Helmand province. He said NATO airplanes had bombed his house and that he was the only person who survived from his entire family. Badly injured, he wound up in Mirwais Hospital, in Kandahar. When he was discharged he went to live in a hut in the outskirts of the city.

I felt sorry for the man, so I told him that someone I know could help him find a job as a watchman in a government building. He answered: “I would rather die than work for the government.” Then he walked away.

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STORY OF A TALIBAN AMBUSH
Kandahar, Afghanistan
By The Journalist Connection
27 Oct 2010

KANDAHAR: AFGHANISTAN: Abdul Khaliq was a poor farmer from the Panjwayi district of Kandahar province. On February 6th, 2009, an international organization gave him free wheat seeds, fertilizers, and cement parcels so that he could make a living without having to grow opium poppies.

That same morning, Abdul rented two trucks, with drivers and helpers, to transport these goods from Kandahar city to his village in Panjwayi.

While en route, a group of Taliban ambushed the trucks. The fact that the trucks were carrying “infidel products” was enough for the Taliban to murder everyone on the spot without conducting any further investigation. Along with Abdul, the Taliban killed the two truck drivers and their two helpers. Their bullet-riddled bodies were found in a small side road not far from the site of the attack.

I knew Abdul because he was a relative of a friend of mine. As soon as I heard what had happened I went to Abdul’s house.

His body was covered with a cloth, and laid out in the courtyard of the family’s house to allow relatives and friends to take a last look at him. When I saw him I could not believe my eyes. It looked like the Taliban had emptied three magazines of AK-47 in his body. How can human beings do something like this? How can they go so far away from humanity?

Abdul’s brother was yelling and screaming in front of the body while his relatives tried to calm him down. I could hear crying and wailing coming from the women’s quarters. The 7-year-old son of Abdul was also there.

In that house full of misery and desperation I became deeply upset and fell into my thoughts. As a civilian living in Kandahar I know about these things. It doesn’t matter whether it’s the United States or the Taliban doing the shooting. Those who get killed are always civilians. I remember thinking to myself: today the Taliban killed Abdul in cold blood; tomorrow perhaps the American soldiers will do the same to someone else.

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NATO SHOT AN INNOCENT MAN
Kandahar, Afghanistan
By The Journalist Connection
27 Oct 2010

KANDAHAR, AFGHANISTAN: I still remember what I saw on that morning as if it were today. It was August 17, 2007, and I was driving my motorcycle to the school where I work as an English teacher. The time was 6:45 a.m., and the sun was just starting to rise.

I made a turn onto a street called Alama Habibi Watt, near Zahir Shahi High School, and I saw several NATO tanks rolling along the road. They were beige in color and had machine guns and cameras mounted on top. A few people were walking in the street, but not many.

The front lights of the tanks signaled everyone to step aside and give way. People here are used to tanks and know that they must let them pass first.

A young man on a bicycle stopped to allow the tanks to pass. He was wearing a light shalwar kameez and a Baluchi hat. When the NATO convoy was in front of him, the man glanced at the soldiers.

Then I heard a shot. I still don’t understand why, but one of the NATO gunners sitting on top of a tank had shot the man on the bicycle in his forehead, killing him instantly.

One shot to the head and the soldiers drove away without any explanation. It all happened very quickly. When I saw this I felt scared and disheartened, so I left immediately and went to school to teach my class. I thought I could just move on and forget what I had seen. But as I talked to my students and answered their questions I felt a strange pain deep inside me. It was one of the worst days in my life.

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The Light In The Cave (Subtitles)
Afghanistan
By sarakeawal
24 Sep 2010

This film features the story of the filmmaker, Suleiman Amanzad, who survived the genocide of the residents of Bamyan province in central Afghanistan by the Taliban in 1999. The filmmaker was four years old when the Taliban captured their village and began massacring people.

His family and other villagers hid themselves in a cave near the village, and this is how they survived the genocide. After that the family of the filmmaker move to Kabul, where Suleiman gets a chance to go to school. He also gets a scholarship from the US Embassy of Kabul and attends one year of high school in the United States.

The film is eight minutes long.

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Thomas Louis Gilzean
Edinburgh
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Thomas Louis Gilzean, a Scottish WWII veterans who fought both in Asia as part of a commando outfit and in Europe against the Germans.

"In Benghazi we lived inside a very nice hotel with my unit," he said. "We fought there until March 1941, when the Germans invaded with Rommel. We soon had to retreat but before we booby-trapped the hotel, and took the fireplace with us. It looked expensive."

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Ante Vukovich
Dubrovnik
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Ante Vukovich is a Croatian WWII veteran who fought against German forces occupying his country during the Second World War. Ante fought with Communist partisan units as an infantryman.

"During my first firefight I couldn't control my Czech machine gun and almost shot one of my fellow soldiers," he said.

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Bernard du Bois
Vilvoorde
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Bernard du Bois is a Belgium WWII veteran who fought with the Allies against German troops occupying his country.

"After being wounded by a Stuka attack, I was picked up by Germans who brought me to a German field hospital in Montreuille-sur-mer, where a German army doctor operated on me atop 12 hundred liter barrel of Champagne," he said. "He saved my life."

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Salomon Freidlyand
Brooklyn, NY
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Salomon Freidlyand is a Byelorussian WWII veteran who fought within the Red Army on the Russian front against the German invader.

"I was sent back to the 297th division to start training partisans and to gather information on the German positions," he said. "I had my own horse, and would often go behind German lines and meet these locals and partisans."

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Thomas Hermann
Sicklerville, NJ
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Thomas Hermann is a WWII veteran who fought in the German army on the Russian front as an infantryman.

"I took part of a counter-attack in late November 1943," he said. "The entire regiment was send forward. The fighting was hard with many close-quarter battles. Two Russian divisions were wiped out in the process. During the fighting, I remember that I could see the white of my enemies eyes."

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Herbert Drossler
Verson
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Herbert Drossler was a loader in a German Tiger tank during the battle of Normandy against American forces.

"Near Vires during a British offensive only 60 meters away, I noticed a dying French civilian between the lines," he said. "He was shouting, 'mother, mother help me' and was wounded in the stomach by shrapnel. I then saw his mother run towards him, so I decided to help her to stop the blood coming out of her son's wound."

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Bjorn Ostring
Oslo
By Jonathan Alpeyrie
29 Mar 2010

Bjorn Ostring is an ex Waffen SS Norwegian volunteer who fought as a platoon leader on the Russian front.

"We arrived to the front near the town of Urizk," he said. "As soon as we arrived at the front, we were thrown into the battle to contain Russian troops attacking the area."