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Alp & Anna
Nicosia, Cyprus
By Vasia Markides
26 Jul 2013

'Alp and Anna' This short film features two inspiring 18-year-olds - Alparslan Balci, a Turkish Cypriot and Anna Leonidou, a Greek Cypriot. Living on the divided island of Cyprus, these two young people are active members of Youth Activism - a UNDP-ACT project that aims to encourage and inspire the youth of Cyprus to actively participate in the efforts for a peaceful solution of the Cyprus problem. Alp and Anna are friends, who have worked on joint activities implemented by the project in order to engage young people in peace building, to empower and support them to play an active role in the reconciliation process and to build support structures for them to continue in youth activism. Here, they talk about their work together, and their view on the situation in Cyprus.

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Riot Police Use Dangerous Weapons Aga...
Bahrain
By AlFardan
26 Jul 2013

In Bahrain, Abu Saiba riot police were using molotov weapons against the anti-government protesters.

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"Hidden in the Sand" Trailer
Famagusta, Cyprus and Nicosia, Cyprus
By Vasia Markides
26 Jul 2013

In 1974, a coup backed by the Greek military junta instigated Turkey to invade the nation of Cyprus. They captured almost 40% of the island and displaced its residents, both Greek- and Turkish-Cypriot. Varosha, which was a thriving port city in Famagusta on the east coast of Cyprus, was occupied and all its Greek-Cypriot residents forced to leave their homes. Since then, Varosha has been encircled by barbed wire and kept under surveillance by the Turkish military, which uses the territory as a bargaining chip in negotiations with the Cyprus government. Its citizens are still forbidden to return. Over the last 38 years, Varosha went from being “Cyprus’s Riviera”, to a dilapidated ghost city; its former inhabitants watch their houses decay from outside the barricades. Within Varosha’s limits rare sea turtles nest on the beaches, bougainvilleas overtake deteriorating homes, and wild asparagus and prickly pear plants run rampant. As both the maker and a participant, the filmmaker examines the fate of this “city in captivity” and her family’s connection to it. Contemporary scenes of the vacant city are contrasted with archives of the bourgeoning Varosha of the 1970’s. Ultimately though, the film tackles the ugly effects of nationalism, militarism, and propaganda in the Greek and Turkish Cypriot communities.

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Young People in Jordan Talk about Pea...
Amman, Jordan
By Amy Hybels
21 Jul 2013

Initial meetings in Washington are set to get underway nine days after U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced in Amman that an agreement had been reached that establishes a basis for resuming direct final status negotiations between the Palestinians and the Israelis.
Video Journalist Amy Hybels talked with young people living in Jordan, which has a large Palestinian population, following Kerry's initial announcement to find out how much hope they hold out for the resumption of peace talks.

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Raw Footage: Muslim Brothers March Fr...
Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt
By Ali Khaled
06 Jul 2013

5 th June 2013
Muslim Brothers marched from Giza to Maspero, but the Anti-Morsi presence stopped them march on the 6th October bridge. The army arrived after Pro-Morsi demonstrators tried to go to Maspero and clashes broke out in Tahrir SQ.

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Cyprus Bank Affects Helios Airways Or...
Paralimni, Cyprus
By Vasia Markides
01 Jul 2013

This piece tells the story of the Koutsofta family who suffered the loss of their son, daughter in law and granddaughter in the 2005 Helios Airlines crash. With the recent economic crisis in Cyprus, a second tragedy has struck that particularly affects the life of their grandson, the only surviving member of their son's family.

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Egyptians Interaction with the Army A...
Tahrir Square, Cairo , Egypt
By Ali Khaled
01 Jul 2013

Egyptians interaction with the army again after the dismissal of President Morssi .

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Chronicles of Africa's Largest Slum
Nairobi, Kenya
By Sam Charo
01 Jul 2013

This is Dandora, Africa's largest slum, the African Slum Journal follows people who eke out a living by scavenging through the junkyard.
Its not only a convergence of humanity with filth, grime and dirt but also a haven of risks of diseases.
The scavengers feed on leftovers, for ages men and women in neighboring communities have been working here to find a source of income, food and find sustainable livelihood.

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Anti-Gay Marriage Demonstration
Paris, France
By tipilakota
26 May 2013

Tens of thousands of people protested against France's new gay marriage law in central Paris on Sunday.
The law came into force over a week ago, but organizers decided to go ahead with the long-planned demonstration to show their continued opposition as well as their frustration with President Francois Hollande, who had made legalizing gay marriage one of his keynote campaign pledges in last year's election.
Marchers set off from three separate points across Paris, and by early evening they filled the Invalides esplanade just across the Seine River from the Champs Elysees.

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Imran Khan's Final Election Rally In ...
Islamabad, Pakistan
By U.S. Editor
08 May 2013

Interviews sharing the opinions of PTI party supporters and proponents of Imran Khan for the next Prime Minister of Pakistan.

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Bamiyan Buddhas Timelapse Video
Bamyan, Afghanistan
By johnjournalist
30 Apr 2013

A timelapse video of the buddhas of Bamiyan destroyed by the Taliban.

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A Swiss Tattoo Artist in Nepal
Kathmandu, Nepal
By Rajneesh Bhandari
28 Apr 2013

A Swiss tattoo artist explains why tattoo is important for him in the 3rd International Tattoo Convention held in Kathmandu.

The convention that was held from April 26 to 28 showcased 70 national and international tattoo artists.

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Lagos Black Heritage Festival
Lagos, Nigeria
By Taiwo Adeleke
31 Mar 2013

Inspired by the spirit of convergence for which Lagos remains pre-eminent, the Lagos Black Heritage Festival celebrates African creativity within a carnivalesque of traditional and contemporary Dance, Music, Painting and Photo Exposition, Drama, Design and Fashion Display, an International Symposium, Film and Video Fiesta and other artistic and intellectual offerings, both inter-state and international. In a seven-day cultural manifestation during which hundreds of performers will animate the ancient city of Badagry and cosmopolitan Lagos with a passage of the traditional and the modern, Lagos State will welcome thousands of visitors with a feast to engage the mind, entrance the senses and linger in the memory for years to come.
Video information

VIDEO SHOWS:

The Lagos Water Regatta is about water-based cultural sporting and recreational activity was put together to showcase what the various coastal communities have to offer in terms of water sport, cultural beauty and aquatic splendor.

The regatta consist of large fishing boats, ferries, water lightening, barges and other marine vessels adorned with each depicting the social, cultural, traditional folklore's and occupational aspects of the Lagos people.

The second is the LAGOS STREET CARNIVAL - which traditionally rounds up the Festival, preceded by an innovation that enlarges the scope of youth participation in the event with colorful display of art, Dance and talent ant participant from all around the world to witness the event.

SOUNDBITES:
-.Soundbite 1-Otunba Olusegun Jawando.-(male)Chairman Regatta Planning committee. -Soundbite 2-Female dancers -Soundbite 3- Akinlolu Osudonire- Male-Tourist

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

2013 Lagos Heritage Week takes place within an event framework that the Festival has designated The Year of Brazil. After Italy and the Horn of Africa in the series – THE BLACK IN THE MEDITERRANNEAN BLUE - comes the turn of Portugal, once a great European maritime nation, and the first European nation to establish diplomatic relations with an African counterpart – the Benin Kingdom. Alas, this historic encounter between equals would later degenerate into participation in the infamous slave trade, but would also result in the greatest “rainbow” nation in the world – The Republic of Brazil!.

Brazil, inevitably, once a Portuguese colony, became an irresistible magnet to the Festival planners. There, the African identity emotion runs deep, rendered vibrantly in cultural retentions in forms of worship, largely of the orisa of the Yoruba (the candomble), in performance modes, cuisine, language, attire and music. Such was the enthusiasm from Brazil that it became necessary to transform the Festival into a two-part celebration, so as to provide more time for the participation of the Afro-Brazilian Diaspora. To them, the Festival promised the fulfillment of the lifelong dream of homecoming. The second part – October 1-10 may yet prove the largest Diaspora Return since the Black and African Arts Festival in Lagos, 1977, better known as FESTAC 77.

What has now turned into THE YEAR OF BRAZIL was formally launched in December 2012 by the award-winning Thobias de Vai Vai Samba Group. Lagos will not soon forget that uniquely sinuous collaboration of costume and motion at the dedicated Festival venue – Freedom Park. The performance signaled a formal declaration that the Brazilian calendar had been brought forward - on the authority of the Yoruba orisa – A-ase! - thus inaugurating an Afro-Brazilian year that commenced in December 2012. The year now progresses into the Festival’s regular Easter calendar in a feast of Thematic Exhibitions, Dance, Drama, Debates and Spectacles with a special cultural presence by the Afro-Brazilian descendants of Nigeria.

The March events pay homage to the late Afro-Brazilian playwright, painter, revolutionary and senator, Abdias do Nascimento, whose life-long dialogue with the orisa will dominate the exhibition galleries. His spiritual play, SORTILEGE, also takes the stage for the first time in West Africa. Abdias is the most impassioned Brazilian link with the continent in the realm of culture, racial identity and political struggle. Exiled in Nigeria’s Yoruba cradle of humanity, Ile-Ife, for some years during the Brazilian dictatorship, it is only fitting that this radical humanist be brought back to his most memorable place of exile. He remains the dynamic symbol of African affirmation in the face of historic odds, the vitality of her cultures, and the assertiveness of racial identity. Befittingly, his widow Elisa Larkin do Nascimento will flag off the year’s Lecture series with a lecture on Abdias’ life, art and struggle.

The GRAND PARADE OF MASQUERADES, drawn from all corners of Yoruba land, a moving mosaic of colour and motion, ushers in the Festival. The programme dedicates each Festival morning to featuring the O’odua states – the modern offspring of the revered Yoruba ancestor and nation-builder – Oduduwa. This year also introduces a modern brass band, the legacy of the Afro-Brazilian returnees who dominate the area around Campos Square, famous for its surviving Brazilian architecture. The Bariga Kids will inject youthful verve into the general medley of rhythm and motion.

OBA KOSO, the tragic music-drama of the late Duro Ladipo opens a window into the tragic vision of the most talented tragedians of West African traditional theatre. OBA KOSO scored many firsts world wide, but most relevantly, as the first Nigerian dramatic work to tour Brazil. A drama of the rise and fall of an Alaafin of Oyo, inducted into the Yoruba pantheon as Sango, god of lightning and thunder, it had great resonance for the Brazilian spectators whose preservation of the deities of their original home defied all efforts at suppression by their slave masters. On the same theatre bill is the Festival premiere of Wole Oguntokun’s dramatization of a slice of Lagos history in her early colonial throes – OSHODI TAPA – a key historic role player in the colonial encounter between Lagos traditional governance and the imperial sway.
Brazil and Nigeria again meet in the Video and Film sector. Synopsis of Brazilian films will be provided where the reels have no sub-titles. These film encounters are of course primarily for audience enjoyment, but they are also planned to offer alternative ideas – including technical aspiration, to the now increasingly adventurous Nigerian cinema.

VISION of the CHILD – the Children’s Art Competition – features an unusual – but highly topical – theme. The Festival talent scouts have already visited nearly 400 schools – formal and informal - since the Festival’s inauguration in December – and assembled the lucky talents for their final contest, and a date with recognition at the Gala Award Night.

DO YOUR OWN THING means exactly what it says – a platform for individual or group talent/experimentations/creativity etc, culminating in the Final adjudication and prizes. Jugglers, singers, instrumentalists, formal and street poets, illusionists, choreographers, mummers etc are free to showcase their specializations, or indeed any kind of inspired lunacies. At the end of these capers, some Surprise Prizes – and perhaps opportunities from hovering talent scouts?

Festival 2013 also introduces a special feature – a Guest Company. Inaugurating that slot is the Rwandan Dance Company, known for its elegant, levitating display of balletic poise even in numbers dedicated to warriors. While in Nigeria, they will conduct a joint workshop with Nigerian counterparts, instigating perhaps a new dance synthesis in the search for contemporary idioms for African dance expressions.

Such exertions require a base of nurture. And so the Festival will play host to the Afro-Brazilian Food Fair. Nigerians will discover that akare-je is none other than the akara of the Ita Igarawu or Ilesha market and street stalls, or that their Easter moyo and frejon are adaptations that re-entered the continent at the hands of the returnees who made it back to homeland.

Memory forms a critical dimension of the Festival – memory as history formative, as evocations of achievement, but also – as pain and anguish. The dark history of the continent is commemorated and its victims honoured in the solemn FITILA (Oil Lamp) Procession, a reminder of the Slave Era, and the triumph of resilience and survival. Venue: Badagry, beginning with the Point of Embarkation and terminating at the Point of No Return, with traditional rituals and invocations. Heritage Week dedicates this night event to the Rites of Collective Reflection, drawing strength for the present and future.

Festivals do not end on a sombre note. The joyous face of human concourse is displayed along the lagoon that slices across Lagos, winding round some of the newest hotels and restaurants on the island. This is the route along which the WATER REGATTA will light up the lagoon with decorated crafts, fluttering pennants, synchronized paddles, a display of marine skills and ethnic symbols created by cultural groups, labour unions, youth organisations, craft guilds, warrior descendants etc etc., with some floats narrating the histories of the riverine and sea-going communities. The land equivalent of this ‘peacock parade’ – THE LAGOS STREET CARNIVAL - traditionally rounds up the Festival, preceded by an innovation that enlarges the scope of youth participation – The Children’s Street Carnival. A percussive medley of voices, instruments and pounding feet take to the streets along a designated route that begins from Awolowo Road and ends in Tafawa Balewa square with the crowning of the Pageant Beauty Queen.

Once again, Lagos opens her arms to men, women and children of all races, histories, and cultures, in her mission to animate the past, celebrate the present, and illuminate the future.

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KENYA ELECTIONS 2013
Nairobi, Kenya
By U.S. Editor
04 Mar 2013

Voters line up at polling stations and cast their votes to elect Kenya's upcoming president in general elections on the morning of March 4, 2013.

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Mook, The Teenage Thai Weightlifter
Bangkok, Thailand
By Biel Calderon
03 Mar 2013

Mook, 17, never imagined she could have a different life, away from ricefields and farming. Having lost her mother at the age of 9, she moved to Surin, one of the poorest provinces in Thailand, to live with her father’s family. She was then obliged to work in the fields, clean the house and look after her younger cousins. At 12, a friend of the family saw her strong body and suggested her to earn her life with weightlifting. She got a scholarship for the National Youth Team in Bangkok and started a new life. Now she gets a small salary and has a safe place to stay while she pursues her studies in high school.

Many children and youth from poor families in Thailand are sent to this kind of programmes to get a chance to study and earn some money. Most of them choose the traditional boxing, Muay Thai, but weightlifting is becoming more popular as some Thai female athletes have recently won some Olympic medals.

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Archaeologists Discover Paleolithic A...
Vila Nova de Foz Coa Douro, Portugal
By U.S. Editor
11 Feb 2013

COA VALLEY, Portugal -- 18 January 2013 -- WHOEVER carved the graceful figures into the rocks of this valley on the upper reaches of the River Douro had no camera, pencils or paper. Though recent discoveries by Portuguese archaeologists have confirmed that the Palaeolithic Sapiens Sapiens that inhabited the Coa Valley 30,000 to 10,000 years ago were among the first humans to invent animation.

Using a quartzite tool, they carved thousands of depictions of animals, some of which - like the Przewalski's horse at the site on the upper part of the Coa Valley at Penascosa - show a clear understanding of movement depicted in animation, archaeologists here say.

"We cannot prove what the carvings were intended to do exactly...But if you consider cinema, then it is like two or three frames a second," says Antonio Batarda, an archaeologist who specializes in the animated figures of the Coa Valley Archaeological Park.

"What they are doing with these figures, when you analyse it...Is cinema," says Luis Miguel de Silva Simoes Luis (Luis Luis), another archaeologist at the Coa Valley Archaeological Park Museum.

"They break down movement and recompose it...What you then see is a goat or horse moving it's legs or head," he explains.

One sheltered site still shows the remains of ocre-painted figures, which are mostly of large herbivores such as the Aurochs - a bovine species about three times the size of the bulls and cows we see today. Other rock panels at the various sites here depict classic species of the Pleistiocene like the large deer Megalocerus, the Ibex, Aurochsen, horses and various species of goat - to name but a few. Rare human figures are also depicted. The tradition of carving on the rock panels here continued through the Neolithic and right up until recent centuries with Christian motiffs.

Back in the Palaeolithic, the Coa Valley - which still has a unique micro-climate - would have provided an easy environment for the small groups of Sapiens Sapiens living a nomadic hunter-gather existence. Outside of the valley, large predatory species like lions were common and the River Coa provided a certain security and was abundant in game.

Strangely, many of the figures carved onto the rocks beside the River Coa depict animals which would have been a significant challenge for Palaeoloithic man to hunt.

"Hunting was important...But it was mostly entertainment, as it was mostly the animal behaviour which seemed to have interested them," Antonio Batarda says, adding that it is impossible to prove what the animated figures (or the non-animated ones) were actually used for.

It is likely, he says, that the animations were indeed just that, using fire and screens in co-ordinated movement to create the illusion of movement, rather like the special effects on the stage of a late Victorian theatre. Animals were of great importance to Palaeolithic man and were likely to have been a form of entertainment in themselves, Batarda adds.

There are around one hundred panels depicting animated movement. Sometimes it is subtle, such as a horse flicking it's ears or a goat sticking out it's tongue. Others are more complex and show a horse moving it's head or a goat involved in a mating display.

Not all the archaeologists here are certain about the sites being an ancient cinema, but all agree that the carvings are definately animations.

"I compare it with comic books...I think it may be pushing it a bit to say it was cinema. Though it was the first time we know that animation was used," says Antonio Martinho Baptista, the Director of the Coa Valley Archaeological Park.

Mr Martinho Baptista says that the Palaeolithic humans who inhabited the Coa Valley were nomadic and wandered around in small groups of 30-50 individuals over a radius of around 90 miles and were probably around a thousand or so in number.

The site was discovered in the mid 1990s during archaeological surveys to construct a hydro-electric dam. It soon became a UNESCO World Heritage Site and thus far, archaeologists have found around 100 outdoor rock carvings which show some form of animation.

"I believe it had a function...This was public art," says Martinho Baptista. He says that as it was public - it was probable that the carvings were used for story telling and education. Religion may have also played a part, the figures show many pregnant animals, possibly signifying some kind of reverence for the creation of new life.

This makes sites of outdoor Upper Palaeolithic art like the Coa Valley very important in our understanding of our ancient ancestors, he adds. While the Lascaux cave paintings are famous, Mr Martinho Baptista believes cave art was rare and that much of the art of the Upper Palaolithic was outdoors carved on rocks like in the Coa Valley.

"Why did we find the art at Lascaux? Because they were protected. Nowadays, we think that the open air Palaeolithic art was much more common...Though much of it has been destroyed by wind and rain...Probably cave art in this time was exceptional," says Luis.

One of the more tender carvings depicts a moment of affection between two horses, a favourite of the museum's director. For Martinho Baptista, this is a prime example of the keen eye of Palaeolithic man. "It's a masterful work...It was made 20,000 years ago...But could be shown in a gallery by a modern artist today," he says.

Whatever the actual true use of these rock carving animations was, it is clear that these recent discoveries by Portuguese archaeologists in the Coa Valley render the popular image of prehistoric man quite obsolete. "Palaeolithic man was an artist just like some contemporary ones," Martinho Bapista says. -ends- approx 700 words

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Nigeria railway relaunch
Lagos, Nigeria
By Taiwo Adeleke
07 Feb 2013

After a ten years of absence the Nigerian railway corporation begins transit on the Lagos-Kano route. The nigeria railway corporation relaunches services back on some major route in the country after improvements costings about 66 million dollars. The railways system is one of the oldest means of transport in Nigeria since 1898.The Railway systems as been deteriorated for more than 20 years now, most Nigerians who make use of the transport system are looking up to better services and more technological improvements as the corporation begins service back on major route in the country.
Video information

Video shows:
00:00 wide shot of train station terminal Lagos
00:02 wide shot of people lining up at the Train station
00:05 medium shot of people lining up at the train station
00:09 close up shot of people sitting at the train station
00:12 medium shot of Economy Class Transit sign
00:14 medium shot of people walking to enter train
00:17 medium shot of passengers walking in the train station
00:21 medium shot walking near the trains
00:27 wide shot of train railways
00:31 wide shot of train
00:39 medium shot of the inside of the train
00:44 wide shot of the train moving at the train station

Soundbite:
00:51 Yinusa omotayo ( Passenger at the Train Station)
"What the government can do first is to encourage workers working at the train station and put in more money to do create more rails. This is my second time entering the train. The last time it was around the 80"s and during that time there was no AC . Thank God now there is AC in the trains. There were no restaurants, notting, you just entered and slept when you wanted to. But this time around they are trying to improve however they can still improve more. Now the water is not running may be with time they will do that so that the water can run. But most importantly is to encourage the workers working at the railway stations. Looking at what is happening in Nigeria traveling by road is more risky than traveling by train........"

Background information:

Reporters script

BRAKES let out a deafening screech and steam fills the station as the Lagos-Kano train ends its 30-hour journey. Hundreds of passengers emerge wearily from brightly painted yellow, green and white carriages. It may be sweaty, crowded and very late, but after a ten-year absence this revamped link between Nigeria’s two biggest cities is a welcome relief. Travelling the 1,126km (700 miles) at an average speed of less than 50km an hour with endless stops, it is no wonder the trip takes so long. But for most Nigerians the low fares are worth it. A second-class ticket from Lagos to Kano costs around $12, roughly a quarter of the price of a more treacherous bus ride. “Hundreds of people were waiting at Ilorin [300km north of Lagos] but there wasn’t enough space for us all,” says a mother trying to appease a screaming child on her hip. “I had to stand the whole way.”

The service was relaunched last month after improvements costing $166m. Nigeria’s railways, started in 1898, have deteriorated in the past 20 years owing to those old engines of decay, corruption and mismanagement. Nigerians’ domestic travel options are limited. Most cannot afford to go by air, so take to the roads. Overfilled lorries, usually packed with dozens of passengers sitting on cargo, precariously negotiate crater-sized potholes. One stretch of road, nicknamed “Bauchi or Death”, after a northern state, is littered with overturned lorries and cars. well as being dangerous, Nigeria’s woeful transport network slows the economy. A rejuvenated rail network could unplug one of the biggest business bottlenecks. In the short run, freight trains are the priority. The cost of transporting goods on passenger trains is prohibitively expensive. “The charge is almost impossible,” complains Jibrin Bala, a cloth merchant. “On our way here, we had to transfer our goods onto buses.”

The success of the Lagos-Kano route, however slow, indicates the demand for a modern rail network. There are plans to invest in rehabilitating lines along the eastern corridor between Port Harcourt in the south and Maiduguri in the north-east. There is even talk of monorails in a couple of cities. As people scramble on board the new train, it is clear that the Nigerian Railway Corporation will be puffing hard to keep up with demand.

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Brazilian Beach
Barra Grande
By Ralf Falbe
05 Jan 2013

Beach scene in Barra Grande, Bahia, Brazil.

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Lago do Pelourinho Tourism
Salvador da Bahia
By Ralf Falbe
02 Jan 2013

A Baiana woman poses for tourists at Lago do Pelourinho in Salvador da Bahia, Brazil.

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Egyptian Man's Trial For Posting Vide...
Cairo, Egypt
By Video Cairo Sat
17 Oct 2012

On Wednesday, October 17, Cairo courts adjourned the trial of Alvert Saber, an Egyptian Copt accused of blasphemy for posting clips of the anti-Islam video on the Internet, to the session of November 14.

Saber, who denied he posted such clips, is not only accused of insulting Islam, but Christianity too.

Saber’s mother said that the police broke into their apartment illegally while she wasn’t here.

SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Hamdy al-Asiouty, member of Saber’s defense staff
SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Kariman, Alber Saber’s mother

The defense staff of the young man said that their client said he was persecuted in custody by one of the prisoners under orders of a police officer.

The prosecution investigations revealed that the defendant used Islam and Christianity to promote his extreme thoughts on the Internet, mocking God and his prophets and calling for atheism.

A number of human rights activists and supporters call for the release of Saber as he has been practicing his freedom of expression.

Story: Trial of Egyptian Copt for Posting Anti-Islam Video Adjourned to Nov 14
Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: October 17, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: October 17, 2012
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1. Medium external shot of the court in Cairo
2. Various shots of Kariman, Alber Saber’s mother, outside the court
3. Pan left, Saber’s mother entering the court
4. Various shots of crowds of people and reporters at the corridor inside the court, waiting to see Saber while being taken out of the courtroom
5. Pan left, Saber being moved from the courtroom to another room amid tight security and throngs of people and reporters
6. SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Hamdy al-Asiouty, member of Saber’s defense staff
7. SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Kariman, Alber Saber’s mother
8. Medium shot, crowds of reporters and cameramen in a corridor at the court
9. Long shot, crowds of people, reporters and cameramen and Saber’s mother trying to enter the room he was taken to
10.
11. Various shots of Saber’s mother coming out of the court, speaking on the cell phone
12. Wide external shot of the court

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DISCUSSING SYRIA; DEATH OF CAMBODIAN ...
MENA & South East Asia
By Editor's Picks
17 Oct 2012

The UN-Arab League Special Envoy to Syria Lakhdar Brahimi held meetings with top Lebanese officials on Wednesday, October 17, in Beirut over the Syrian issue.

Mourners gather to honor the late king Norodom Sihanouk who died of a heart attack Monday, at the age of 89. His body was returned from China, where he had been receiving medical treatment.

On Wednesday, October 17, Cairo courts postponed the trial of Alvert Saber, a young Egyptian accused of blasphemy for posting clips of the anti-Islam video, "Innocence of Muslims" on the Internet. The trial will be held November 14th.

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BAHRAINI OPPOSITION PARTIES - Beirut ...
Bahrain,Karbabad
By Beirut Editor's Picks
22 Sep 2012

Thousands of Bahrainis gathered in the Bahraini capital Al Manama to demand the shift towards democracy and chanted, emphasizing the continuation of the popular struggle to demand freedom and dignity.
Bahrainis filled Karbabad Coast region adjacent to the capital on Saturday afternoon (September 22, 2012) during a festival held by the Bahraini opposition forces (Wifaq, Wa’ed, National Assembly, Assembly Unionist, The National Fraternity) under the slogan, "Democracy is our demand.”

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Bahrainis gathered to demand freedom...
Bahrain,Kerbabad
By Media Made by Bahraini People
22 Sep 2012

Thousands of Bahrainis gathered in the Bahraini capital Al Manama to demand the shift towards democracy and chanted, emphasizing the continuation of the popular struggle to demand freedom and dignity.
Bahrainis filled Karbabad Coast region adjacent to the capital on Saturday afternoon (September 22, 2012) during a festival held by the Bahraini opposition forces (Wifaq, Wa’ed, National Assembly, Assembly Unionist, The National Fraternity) under the slogan, "Democracy is our demand.”

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Bahrainis gathered to demand freedom ...
Bahrain,Kerbabad
By Media Made by Bahraini People
22 Sep 2012

Thousands of Bahrainis gathered in the Bahraini capital Al Manama to demand the shift towards democracy and chanted, emphasizing the continuation of the popular struggle to demand freedom and dignity.
Bahrainis filled Karbabad Coast region adjacent to the capital on Saturday afternoon (September 22, 2012) during a festival held by the Bahraini opposition forces (Wifaq, Wa’ed, National Assembly, Assembly Unionist, The National Fraternity) under the slogan, "Democracy is our demand.”

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Bahrainis gathered to demand freedom ...
Bahrain,Kerbabad
By Media Made by Bahraini People
22 Sep 2012

Thousands of Bahrainis gathered in the Bahraini capital Al Manama to demand the shift towards democracy and chanted, emphasizing the continuation of the popular struggle to demand freedom and dignity.
Bahrainis filled Karbabad Coast region adjacent to the capital on Saturday afternoon (September 22, 2012) during a festival held by the Bahraini opposition forces (Wifaq, Wa’ed, National Assembly, Assembly Unionist, The National Fraternity) under the slogan, "Democracy is our demand.”

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Bahrainis gathered to demand freedom ...
Bahrain,Kerbabad
By Media Made by Bahraini People
22 Sep 2012

Thousands of Bahrainis gathered in the Bahraini capital Al Manama to demand the shift towards democracy and chanted, emphasizing the continuation of the popular struggle to demand freedom and dignity.
Bahrainis filled Karbabad Coast region adjacent to the capital on Saturday afternoon (September 22, 2012) during a festival held by the Bahraini opposition forces (Wifaq, Wa’ed, National Assembly, Assembly Unionist, The National Fraternity) under the slogan, "Democracy is our demand.”

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Bahrainis gathered to demand freedom ...
Bahrain,Kerbabad
By Media Made by Bahraini People
22 Sep 2012

Thousands of Bahrainis gathered in the Bahraini capital Al Manama to demand the shift towards democracy and chanted, emphasizing the continuation of the popular struggle to demand freedom and dignity.
Bahrainis filled Karbabad Coast region adjacent to the capital on Saturday afternoon (September 22, 2012) during a festival held by the Bahraini opposition forces (Wifaq, Wa’ed, National Assembly, Assembly Unionist, The National Fraternity) under the slogan, "Democracy is our demand.”

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Bahrainis gathered to demand freedom ...
Bahrain,Kerbabad
By Media Made by Bahraini People
22 Sep 2012

Thousands of Bahrainis gathered in the Bahraini capital Al Manama to demand the shift towards democracy and chanted, emphasizing the continuation of the popular struggle to demand freedom and dignity.
Bahrainis filled Karbabad Coast region adjacent to the capital on Saturday afternoon (September 22, 2012) during a festival held by the Bahraini opposition forces (Wifaq, Wa’ed, National Assembly, Assembly Unionist, The National Fraternity) under the slogan, "Democracy is our demand.”

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Bahrain-Opposition symposium inside U...
Geneva
By Media Made by Bahraini People
19 Sep 2012

A symposium was organized by the opposition delegation at U.N.’s European headquarters in Geneva named "Toward justice achievement in Bahrain". The attendees confirmed their insistence on the implementation of the UN and civil institutions recommendations and instructions.

Several papers were presented and one of them was by Hadi Al-Mosawi- a leader at Al-Wefaq society who talked about the continuous human rights violations on the period from the last Geneva session till now. He mentioned detailed statistics about the number of political detainees, number of injuries and detained children.

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Bahrain-Opposition symposium inside U...
Geneva
By Media Made by Bahraini People
19 Sep 2012

A symposium was organized by the opposition delegation at U.N.’s European headquarters in Geneva named "Toward justice achievement in Bahrain". The attendees confirmed their insistence on the implementation of the UN and civil institutions recommendations and instructions.

Several papers were presented and one of them was by Hadi Al-Mosawi- a leader at Al-Wefaq society who talked about the continuous human rights violations on the period from the last Geneva session till now. He mentioned detailed statistics about the number of political detainees, number of injuries and detained children.

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Bahrain-Opposition symposium inside U...
Geneva
By Media Made by Bahraini People
19 Sep 2012

A symposium was organized by the opposition delegation at U.N.’s European headquarters in Geneva named "Toward justice achievement in Bahrain". The attendees confirmed their insistence on the implementation of the UN and civil institutions recommendations and instructions.

Several papers were presented and one of them was by Hadi Al-Mosawi- a leader at Al-Wefaq society who talked about the continuous human rights violations on the period from the last Geneva session till now. He mentioned detailed statistics about the number of political detainees, number of injuries and detained children.

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Commissioners Delay Reviewing Court D...
Egypt, Cairo
By Marta Bogdanska
03 Sep 2012

The Commissioners assigned to review the Supreme Constitutional Court decision of parliament dissolution adjourned on Sunday, September 2, reviewing the decision to October 12.
The Constitutional Court ruled mid June the unconstitutionality of Egypt’s first post-revolution parliament, and the ruling Military Council then carried out the court ruling.
Two lawyers filed lawsuits against the court order and demanded return of the dissolved parliament, arguing that the Constitutional Court does not have the right to dissolve the parliament and that it is only assigned with ruling the constitutionality of laws and referring any other cases to the concerned courts.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohamed al-Omda, lawyer, member of the Constitutional and Legislative Affairs Committee of the dissolved parliament:
“The Constitutional Court bypassed its duties when it ruled the parliament dissolution, although the parliament wasn’t represented in the lawsuit. So, the court made many violations, which are all stated and the lawsuit was adjourned to be reviewed, as it is an urgent lawsuit and related to the country’s legislative authority.”

SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mahmoud Abdo Ammar, lawyer, representing claimant against Shura Council dissolution:
“The Constitutional Court overrode its authorities, because since it was established, it never issued a ruling and carried it out at the same time. It is only assigned to judge whether a law wording is constitutional or not, and refer relevant lawsuits to concerned courts.”

President Mohamed Morsi issued a decree on July 8 ordering reinstatement of the dissolved parliament, but two days later the Constitutional Court issued a ruling suspending Morsi’s decree.
The dissolved parliament was Egypt’s first post-revolution parliament and it was dominated by Islamists, particularly the Muslim Brotherhood group.
Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: September 2, 2012 (and archive)
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: September 2, 2012
Length: 0:01:49
Video Size: 89.6 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS
SHOTLIST:
1- Wide overview of Cairo and the River Nile
2- Wide shot, traffic at a street in Cairo
3- Various external shots of Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court headquarters in Cairo
4- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohamed al-Omda, lawyer, member of the Constitutional and Legislative Affairs Committee of the dissolved parliament:
“The Constitutional Court bypassed its duties when it ruled the parliament dissolution, although the parliament wasn’t represented in the lawsuit. So, the court made many violations, which are all stated and the lawsuit was adjourned to be reviewed, as it is an urgent lawsuit and related to the country’s legislative authority.” 5- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mahmoud Abdo Ammar, lawyer, representing claimant against Shura Council dissolution:
“The Constitutional Court overrode its authorities, because since it was established, it never issued a ruling and carried it out at the same time. It is only assigned to judge whether a law wording is constitutional or not, and refer relevant lawsuits to concerned courts.” 6- Wide external shot of the lower house of parliament (the People’s Assembly) headquarters in Cairo
7- Various shots of a parliament session (archive)
8- Various external shots of the upper house of parliament (the Shura Council) headquarters in Cairo
9- Various shots of a Shura Council session (archive)

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Protests in Egypt against President M...
Cairo, Egypt
By Daniel Crossman
24 Aug 2012

Thousands of protesters gathered on Friday, August 24, around the Presidential Palace area in Cairo, protesting against President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood.
The protesters, who included former liberal Parliamentarian Mohamed Abou Hamed, call for an end to the regime of President Morsi, the first freely elected president since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak in February 2011.
SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohie al-Manialawi, retired general and one of the protesters:
“President Mohamed Morsi wants to put the Muslim Brotherhood in all positions. We are the only country in the Middle East, or the world, that has a party based on religion. There are Muslims, Copts and many factions in the country. The President must be a president for all.” SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mina Fathy, a Copt activist and one of the protesters:
“We demand that Morsi understands now that the Egyptian people don’t want him. We ask him to leave quietly, without suffering what Hosni Mubarak or other presidents suffered. We want him to leave the country to someone who loves it.” The protesters chanted statements against Morsi and the MB, accusing Morsi of being a traitor who wants to monopolize power in Egypt.

However, a lot of Egyptians are against the protests, believing that the President and his government must be given enough time to work and resolve the country’s issues.
SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Essam Abdel-Malek, a citizen against the protest:
“The U.S. President won elections with a very small number of votes, but they all recognized him as president for all Americans. We should learn this. Morsi made democratic decisions such as releasing journalists from temporary detention during trials. We should wait and give a chance to this government to work in order not to interrupt people’s work and interests, so that the country goes on towards development.” The protesters were shouting slogans like "down with the rule of the Brotherhood”, calling for a civil state not a Brotherhood state.
The protesters were mostly supporters of the military, liberals, Copts and activists calling for an end to the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood, claiming that Morsi only represents the MB not all Egyptians.
No violence was reported during the protests.

Local News Agency: Middle East Bureau / VCS
Shooting Dateline: August 24, 2012
Shooting Location: Cairo, Egypt
Publishing Time: August 24, 2012
Length: 0:03:10
Video Size: 156 MB
Language: Arabic
Column:
Organized by:
Correspondent:
Camera: VCS

SHOTLIST:
1- Various shots of security men blocking the streets leading to the Presidential Palace with barbed wires
2- Various shots of rallies of protestors shouting against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood
3- Various shots of former liberal Parliamentarian Mohamed Abou Hamed leading a rally of protestors
4- Various shots of a massive protest around a street leading to the Presidential palace
5- SOUNDBITE 1 (Arabic) – Mohie al-Manialawi, retired general and one of the protestors:
“President Mohamed Morsi wants to put the Muslim Brotherhood in all positions. We are the only country in the Middle East, or the world, that has a party based on religion. There are Muslims, Copts and many factions in the country. The President must be a president of all.” 6- SOUNDBITE 2 (Arabic) – Mina Fathy, a Copt activist and one of the protestors:
“We demand that Morsi understands now that the Egyptian people don’t want him. We ask him to leave quietly, without suffering what Hosni Mubarak or other presidents suffered. We want him to leave the country to someone who loves it.” 7- Various shots of rallies of protestors shouting against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood
8- Various shots of protestors spreading a huge flag of Egypt and shouting against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood
9- SOUNDBITE 3 (Arabic) – Essam Abdel-Malek, a citizen who is against the protest:
“The U.S. President won elections with a very small number of votes, but they all recognized him as the president for all Americans. We should learn this. Morsi made democratic decisions such as releasing journalists from temporary detention during trials. We should wait and give a chance to this government to work in order not to interrupt people’s work and interests, so that the country goes on towards development.” 10- Various shots of security men blocking the streets leading to the Presidential Palace
11- Various shots of rallies of protestors shouting against Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood
12- Medium shot, a woman at a protest shouting “Down with the Muslim Brotherhood!”
13- Various shots of protestors close to the barbed wires around the Presidential Palace
14- Various shots of protestors raising signs against the Muslim Brotherhood
15- Various shots of protests outside the Presidential Palace

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Glimpses Of Ramadan In Different Coun...
Cairo, Egypt
By Editor's Picks
02 Aug 2012

Collection of videos and photos depicting Ramadan experiences in different locations.

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Our Contributor In Syria - Samples Fr...
Syria
By Editor's Picks
28 Jul 2012

From our contributor, currently on the ground in Syria, these photos depict Libyan youth throughout the revolution and the aftermath of violence in Syria. Our contributor is able to get HD footage for feature stories, video packages, or documentary features as well as high quality photos from the front lines.

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Esplin120711_2385.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
11 Jul 2012

The rate of ocean acidification is expected to accelerate in the near future. Since the industrial revolution, ocean acidification has increased by 30%. Scientists believe that this rate is faster than anything previously experienced over the last 55 million years.

The problem is that even a mild change in PH levels has significant impact on animals with calcium carbonate shells or skeletons. They literally dissolve. Affected animals include krill and plankton as well as coral. This means that the bottom of the food web could potentially become extinct, and in turn so could fish, according to Zoologist Kent Carpenter: "If corals themselves are at risk of extinction and do in fact go extinct, that will most probably lead to a cascade effect where we will lose thousands and thousands of other species that depend on coral reefs.”

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Esplin120710_2336.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
10 Jul 2012

A fisherman wades through the shallows carrying a handful of possessions after a mornings fishing trip.

Attempts to educate fishermen have been made by the environmental community, and attitudes are slowly changing. The Coral Triangle Initiative announced that it saw a decrease in the use of destructive fishing methods in 2012. Although, they stated that other threats such as Population increase, pollution and sedimentation have increased considerably.

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Esplin120710_2384.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
10 Jul 2012

A fisherman on Palawan Island in the Philippines prepares for a fishing voyage out to sea.

Scientists have predicted that by 2100, global temperature rise could result in the extinction of coral in the Coral Triangle. This would lead to an 80% reduction in regional food production.