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Catching more plastic than fish.002
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.004
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

A dumpsite was opened in 2013 close to Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, affecting the ecosystems in the area and reducing the amount of fish in the waters. Today Navotas is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.007
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Plastic collected around Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.003
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.006
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.005
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Kids play in Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.008
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Pablo Rosales, 59, is the leader of the National Alliance of Fishers in the Philippines, a country where plastic pollution is affecting fishermen who have seen their catches reduced over the years. The problem is especially acute at the Manila Bay, due to the pollution coming from the city.

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Catching more plastic than fish.009
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.011
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Zaldy Conde, 45, waits at Navotas' dock, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.015
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Fishermen catch mussels in Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where catches have drastically dropped due to plastic pollution in the area. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.012
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared or are smaller. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.014
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Fishermen from Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where catches drastically dropped after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.010
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Christopher P. Lapio, 35, is a fisherman from Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where catches drastically dropped after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.013
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Fishermen from Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where catches drastically dropped after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.017
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

A fisherman from Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where catches drastically dropped after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.018
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Zaldy Conde, 45, prepares his boat in Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.016
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

Christopher P. Lapio, 35, is a fisherman from Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, where catches drastically dropped after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.020
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Catching more plastic than fish.001
Navotas
By Biel Calderon
12 Sep 2018

In Navotas, a fishing community in the Manila Bay, in the Philippines, fishermen have seen a drastic drop in their catches after a dumpsite was opened in 2013 in a coastal area nearby. Today their community is also filled with the trash coming from the dumpsite and most of the fish have disappeared. Their livelihoods are also threatened by other climate change related events, such as the increasing number of storms, as well as the competence from industrial fishing boats.

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Algeria plastic 4
Algeria
By radhouane Digheche
08 Dec 2017

Different pictures describing the plastic waste in Algeria.

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Algeria
By radhouane Digheche
08 Dec 2017

Different pictures describing the plastic waste in Algeria.

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Algeria plastic 8
Algeria
By radhouane Digheche
08 Dec 2017

Different pictures describing the plastic waste in Algeria.

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Algeria plastic 2
Algeria
By radhouane Digheche
08 Dec 2017

Different pictures describing the plastic waste in Algeria.

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Algeria plastic 9
Algeria
By radhouane Digheche
08 Dec 2017

Different pictures describing the plastic waste in Algeria.

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Algeria plastic 13
Algeria
By radhouane Digheche
08 Dec 2017

Different pictures describing the plastic waste in Algeria.

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Algeria plastic
Algeria
By radhouane Digheche
08 Dec 2017

Different pictures describing the plastic waste in Algeria.

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Algeria plastic3
Algeria
By radhouane Digheche
08 Dec 2017

Different pictures describing the plastic waste in Algeria.

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Algeria plastic5
Algeria
By radhouane Digheche
08 Dec 2017

Different pictures describing the plastic waste in Algeria.

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Algeria plastic11
Algeria
By radhouane Digheche
08 Dec 2017

Different pictures describing the plastic waste in Algeria.

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Algeria plastic12
Algeria
By radhouane Digheche
08 Dec 2017

Different pictures describing the plastic waste in Algeria.

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Algeria plastic 6
Algeria
By radhouane Digheche
08 Dec 2017

Different pictures describing the plastic waste in Algeria.

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Trash Collectors
Manila
By Ralf Falbe
13 Jun 2016

Men carry bags of trash along the shoreline of Manila Bay, Philippines

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Aleppo Dump Poses Health Hazard
Aleppo
By Abdu al-Fadel
12 May 2015

May 12, 2015
Aleppo, Syria

Residents of the rebel-held Dawwar Jisr al-Hajj neighborhood in Aleppo have to breathe toxic fumes from an uncovered dump. People suffer serious respiratory tract infections and skin diseases because of living near the makeshift landfill, says a public health activist, who urged people to leave the area.

Local residents complained in interviews that Aleppo's local council, which supports the opposition, has not met its duties in finding a solution for this problem.

TRANSCRIPT

00:58 – 01:36
“Trucks are only moving garbage around; they are not removing garbage out of the dump. The local council is not providing any support for its employees. Q: Who is responsible for moving garbage out of the dump?
A: The local council.
Q: And the local council lacks support.
A: It does not have any support. Even our salaries are meager.
Q: There are no good salaries.
A: No, because there is no support.
Q: What is the solution?
A: The solution… this causes malaria. This is poisoning the environment and people. They should find a solution for this disease.”

01:37 – 01:58
“I sent my children to the village because of this dump. I cannot buy them medications anymore. They mostly complain of chest diseases. They cough and complain about their chest pain all the time. I put them in a car and sent them to the village. This is better than buying medications. I do not want anything to happen to them. Nobody is listening to us. Nobody is responding to us at all!”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mahmoud Barakat, Public Health Activist

02:07 – 03:03
“The area surrounding the dump at Dawwar Jisr al-Hajj is crowded. We have suffered because of this dump for the past four years. This dump is supposed to hold garbage before it is transported somewhere else. It has been the source of bad odors resulting from decomposing substances. Microbes and germs are being diffused in the air.
During the summer garbage is burnt, which diffuses gases and fumes. These fumes spread into an area that has a perimeter of more than five kilometres. Most of the people who live in the surrounding area suffer from chronic respiratory diseases.
People suffer from respiratory tract inflammation. Anyone who has asthma cannot live in this area, either.
Most people who live around Dawwar Jisr al-Hajj wish to find another place to live in because they want to escape fumes and odors.”

03:04 – 03:40
“Many people here suffer from skin and respiratory diseases. These fumes, which have been diffused for the past years, might also cause cancer. This is a very serious issue. This garbage has different substances, including plastic and chemicals. Burning these substances is diffusing toxic fumes. Despite several calls in the past four years, nothing has changed. The policy about this dump has not changed. Everything has been the same.
We urge people to leave this area. Leave this area!”

03:41 – 03:54
“It is not acceptable that I have to wear a mask while walking in the street. It is not acceptable either that bad odor goes through my window, which I have to keep open during the summer. My house is one kilometre away from the dump, as you just saw. I do not dare to open the windows because of the smell.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Unnamed Local Resident
04:34 – 05:15 “I am one of the people who live near the dump of Dawwar Jisr al-Hajj. The dump is completely full. We urge officials who are responsible for this dump to remove the garbage. The diseases from which we are suffering are indescribable. We are trying and urging and different people to do something about this. It is nearly summertime. This could cause leishmaniasis and malaria. We are dying from bugs. Chemical substances are reacting and catching fire. The fumes are also blinding us.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Mahmoud Barakat, Public Health Activist
05:40 – 05:57
“This is an image of the dump while is it on fire. It shows how smoke is spreading throughout the entire city of Aleppo. We urge officials to assume their responsibility towards the poor people who have not left this area. They need to remove the waste as soon as possible.”

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Climate change bangladesh 02
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Oct 2014

Waste chemicals and oil from factories are disposed of in the canals, polluting the river and the soil. Industrial processes are not only a factor in climate change, but also produce toxic waste that threatens Dhaka's natural resources.

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Climate change bangladesh 03
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By zakir hossain chowdhury
30 Oct 2014

A boy poses before a patch of cracked dry earth. Bangladesh has been particularly affected by climate change, where unpredictable heat waves and rainy seasons make life difficult for its people.

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India: Surfing in an Artist’s Pallet ...
Kerala
By Berta Tilmantaite
29 Apr 2014

Kerala is the ultimate getaway destination. With its flawless waves and untouched beauty, the southern province of India attracts surfers from all around the world. For the local population, foreign surfers have become a new curiosity. While surfers and fishermen have learned to coexist and share the beaches, a group of foreign surfers has decided to give back to the community by founding the Sunday Surf Club, where they teach locals how to swim, surf and tame the ocean.

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If You Eat Garlic, You Will Get Full
Heraat, Afghanistan
By Transterra Editor
04 Oct 2013

This film features the miserable life of a group of children in the western city of the Heraat province of Afghanistan by showing their work on the streets of the city.

More importantly, it shows the ill behavior of the residents of the city toward these kids. The film shows how they are treated as outcasts in the society, with people not allowing them in the sports fields, shops, and so on.

The film is ten minutes long.
By: Sara Keawal

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Life Along The Railway (10 of 34)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
By Michael Biach
20 Jun 2013

Residents living right beside railroad tracks in a slum in Bangladesh’s vibrant capital, Dakha. It is home to more than 10 million people, making it one of the world’s most populated cities. Hundreds of people live beside the railroad in the Kawran Bazar slum, where residents face dire conditions in the unsanitary environment. Dakha, Bangladesh, June, 2013.

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Urban Poverty (3 of 4)
Karachi, Pakistan
By Syed Yasir Iqbal Kazmi
15 May 2013

Boy collecting stuff from garbage.

Photo by Yasir Kazmi, Karachi, Pakistan.