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Wildlife Crimes (47 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
31 Oct 2012

This is just one of 16 tigers cubs seized on Friday (26 Oct) after a botched effort to smuggle the tiger cubs across the border from Thailand in Laos. A veterinary team from the wildlife forensic unit are taking blood samples to trace the DNA. Chaiyaphum, Thailand.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crisis (45 of 47)
Payuhakirri, Thailand
By James Morgan
30 Oct 2012

A master Ivory carver at work in Payuhakirri, Thailand. Many carvers claim to use domestic as opposed to African Ivory.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (44 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
29 Oct 2012

A lady wears an Ivory necklace in Tha Phrachan market, Bangkok, Thailand. Ornamental ivory is valued for both spiritual and aesthetic reasons and fetches high prices.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (42 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
29 Oct 2012

Ivory braclets on sale in Tha Phrachan market, Thailand. Ornamental ivory is valued for both spiritual and aesthetic reasons and fetches high prices.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (41 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

Researchers at the Department of National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation's biolab conduct DNA tests on tiger blood and other animal parts in order to try and crack down on the illegal trade. Bangkok, Thailand.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (32 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
26 Oct 2012

In light of the recent escalation in poaching the Thai government have assigned a unit of xxx to help tackle the poaching issue.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (46 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
26 Oct 2012

Elephants are not the only commodity being traded. This year has also seen a rise in the illegal sale of rhinos and tigers. This is just one of 16 tigers cubs seized on Friday (26 Oct).

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (25 of 47)
Kuchanabri, Thailand
By James Morgan
23 Oct 2012

A worker at the Kuchanaburi tiger temple counts money.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Inside the War on Wildlife Crime
Central Africa and East Asia
By Serene Yordi
27 Aug 2012

Wildlife trafficking in Africa has become a major source of finance for armed groups and criminal networks. In countries like Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Sudan and Kenya, poachers move across borders with near impunity.

Governments like Gabon are becoming increasingly alarmed by the threat posed by wildlife trafficking to national security. Rebel groups, drug syndicates and even terrorist networks have seen an opportunity to profit from a low risk, high reward criminal enterprise. To safeguard its remaining elephants, Gabon President Ali Bongo has quadrupled the number of park rangers in the country. Bongo also presided over the burning of $10 million of illegal Ivory seized from poachers, to ensure that none leaked back into the illegal trade.

On the other end of the trade, the final products are nearly unrecognizable. Jewelry and amulets made from ivory are sold in up-scale, air conditioned Thai boutiques whilst other animal parts are used in traditional medicines.

Wildlife crime not only threatens nature’s most iconic species, but exacerbates poverty and corruption, funding an entire spectrum of related international crime. These images trace the story from beginning to end, across continents, offering a sense of the fragility of the human lives that lie in its wake.

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Wildlife Crimes (5 of 47)
Mekobe, Gabon
By James Morgan
23 Jun 2012

A baka pygmy family in Mekobe village, Gabon.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON