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Wildlife Crimes (12 of 47)
Oyem, Gabon
By James Morgan
25 Jun 2012

Two convicted poachers are handcuffed after interrogation at the jail in Oyem, Gabon. Elephant poaching brings much needed income that, for some, outweighs the risk of a three year jail sentence.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (7 of 47)
Minkebe, Gabon
By James Morgan
24 Jun 2012

Eco guards on patrol at night in a logging concession outside Minkebe national park. As longing concessions cut deeper into the forest they open the way both for illegal logging and poaching.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (8 of 47)
Minkebe, Gabon
By James Morgan
24 Jun 2012

Eco guards cook dinner on patrol in a logging concession outside Minkebe national park.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (2 of 47)
Oua River, Gabon
By James Morgan
23 Jun 2012

Eco guards patrol the Oua river in North West Gabon. Rivers are often used as quick ways to export poached Ivory and other bush meat out of the jungle.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (1 of 47)
Oua River, Gabon
By James Morgan
23 Jun 2012

Eco guards check a dug out canoe on the Oua river. Rivers are often used as quick ways to export poached Ivory and other bush meat out of the jungle.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (3 of 47)
Gabon
By James Morgan
23 Jun 2012

In Mekobe village a man rolls the skin of a water cobra. The meat of the snake will be eaten and the skin preserved to hang on his wall. For generations rural Gabonese communities have survived sustainably from bushmeat. But poaching for commercial resale has created an unsustainable demand on large numbers of species.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (4 of 47)
Menkebe, Gabon
By James Morgan
23 Jun 2012

Despite being one of Africa's most resource rich countries, poverty is widespread in Gabon and a big contributor to poaching. This lady is from a Baka pygmy village near Menkebe. The Baka have been targeted by crime syndicates and recruited as poachers due to their intimate knowledge of the jungle.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (5 of 47)
Mekobe, Gabon
By James Morgan
23 Jun 2012

A baka pygmy family in Mekobe village, Gabon.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (6 of 47)
Minkebe, Gabon
By James Morgan
23 Jun 2012

A juvenile mandril monkey, it's mother was killed by poachers and it now lives in Minkebe village.

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Esplin120623_2381.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
23 Jun 2012

A fisherman farms abalone instead of heading out to sea to fish. Communities throughout the Philippines are being encouraged to seek alternative sources of income from fishing. According to the WWF, “The decreased productivity of coastal ecosystems will reduce the food resources and income available to coastal communities in the Coral Triangle. By 2050, coastal ecosystems will only be able to provide 50% of the fish protein that they do today, leading to increasing pressure on coastal agriculture and aquaculture.”

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Esplin120622_2389.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
22 Jun 2012

The cultivation of kelp and seaweed for pharmaceutical industries is being developed by some communities as an alternative source of income to prevent an over reliance of fishing for an income, thereby reducing the stress on local fish populations.

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Esplin120620_2327.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
20 Jun 2012

Children play in a harbour in the Southern Philippines. Scientists have predicted that by 2100, global temperature rise could result in the extinction of coral in the Coral Triangle. This would lead to an 80% reduction in regional food production.

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Esplin120619_2387.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
19 Jun 2012

A child helps sort the catch on a small fishing vessel in the Southern Philippines. With nine percent of the total global reef cover, its national waters provide significant annual fish yield. Increasingly, fish catch are being sold for export, with China and Hong Kong the primary destination.
There is a billion-dollar enterprise in the Asia-Pacific region for live reef food fish trade (LRRFFT). The Philippines is a significant contributor to this industry.

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Esplin120618_2379.jpg
By Mark_Esplin
18 Jun 2012

A Filipino fisherman wears a mask to protect against the sun as he spends the morning catching octopus from a small canoe. Though largely seen as being sustainable, subsistence fishermen with a hook and line can still have an impact on their local ecology. Jared Diamond, an ecological anthropologist, claims the common belief that indigenous people conserve their resources is wrong. He writes that historically when people encounter the limits of their resources, catastrophe results.

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World's Largest Captive Crocodile Die...
Agusan del Sur, Philippines
By jeoffreymaitem
13 Sep 2011

In this photograph taken in September 2011 shows 1,075-kilogramme (2,370-pound) saltwater crocodile at the conservation park in Bunawan, Philippines on February 12, 2013. The 21-foot (6.4-metre) monster, died on February 10, 2012, is suspected of eating a local man who went missing in July 2011 and of killing a 12-year-old girl whose head was bitten off in 2009, was caught in a remote southern creek on September 3, 2011.

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Penguin
Antarctica
By joannacyprys
08 Dec 2010

An Adelie Penguin at a field camp in Antarctica.