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KENYA GAME RANGERS (33 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
05 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Ranger Gafo Enos , left, and Gilbert Kosher from the anti poaching pose at their tent at a observation base in Tsavo East game park in Kenya 5 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (32 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
05 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Ranger Stephen Lewagat from the anti poaching uni question a Kenya Somali herdsman on the edge of the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 5 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (11 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
05 Jun 2013

A elephant can be seen in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 5 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (31 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
05 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Ranger Nixon Simotwo from the anti poaching unit prepare lunch during a patrol in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 5 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (10 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
05 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Rangers from the anti poaching unit prepare lunch during a patrol in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 5 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (30 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
05 Jun 2013

Kenya Wildlife Ranger Sgt. Gafo Enos from the anti poaching unit look for tracks at the fence separating the Tsavo East game park from ranches in Kenya 5 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KENYA GAME RANGERS (19 of 40)
Tsavo East, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
05 Jun 2013

A solar panel charge radio batteries at a Kenya Wildlife Ranger observation point in the Tsavo East game park in Kenya 5 June 2013. PHOTO/KAREL PRINSLOO

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KWS Ranger interview (3 of 3)
Tsavo east, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
04 Jun 2013

KWS Rangers discuss their reasons for and experiences of working on the wildlife preserve in an interview.

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KWS Ranger interview (2 of 3)
Tsavo east, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
04 Jun 2013

KWS Rangers discuss their reasons for and experiences of working on the wildlife preserve in an interview.

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KWS Ranger interview (1 of 3)
Tsavo east, Kenya
By Karel Prinsloo
04 Jun 2013

KWS Rangers discuss their reasons for and experiences of working on the wildlife preserve in an interview.

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Hippos in Gorongosa
Gorongosa, Mozambique
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 May 2013

Hippos are one of the more active fauna in Gorongosa. After decades of civil war the park is growing again thanks to an American millionaire that is donating part of his wealth to the park.

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Gorongosa Antelopes
Gorongosa, Mozambique
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 May 2013

One of the many varieties of Gorongosa antelopes run and jump in the wild and protected area

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Gorongosa Plains
Gorongosa, Mozambique
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 May 2013

Vast plains with a number of antelopes can be easily seen in Gorongosa National Park. Sometimes the quietness of the place can be broken by the presence of a lion family hunting elephants while drinking water at the lake.

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Gorongosa National Park
Gorongosa, Mozambique
By U.S. Editor
05 May 2013

After decades of civil war Gorongosa National Park is growing again thanks to an American millionaire that is donating part of his wealth to preserve the diversity of flora and fauna living on the reserve. Around and inside Gorongosa live around 250,000 persons that continue struggling to survive from a hard daily life after decades of civil war that came after independence from Portugal

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Fishing In Pungue River
Gorongosa, Mozambique
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
05 May 2013

Pungue river borders south Gorongosa National Park and is the workplace of fishing communities that share the banks with animals and nature.

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Gorongosa Villagers
Gorongosa, Mozambique
By Luis Miguel Rodrigues
04 May 2013

Around and inside Gorongosa live around 250,000 persons that continue struggling to survive from a hard daily life after decades of civil war that came after independence from Portugal

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Nile Valley sun-bird
By awaheed.lifesinai
08 Mar 2013

The Nile Valley sunbird’s habitat is all along the Nile Valley. The color of the bird’s feathers changes throughout the year. In the winter, males and females look alike. The sunbird is tiny, just 9 to 10 cm long. It has a pale-grey head and light-yellow breasts. Its bill is long, slender and slightly down-curved. In February, the male sunbird becomes glossy green, with a brilliant sulfur-yellow belly and long tail streamers that add an extra five cm to his total length.

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World's Largest Captive Crocodile Die...
Bunawan, Philippines
By U.S. Editor
12 Feb 2013

In this photograph taken in September 2011 shows 1,075-kilogramme (2,370-pound) saltwater crocodile at the conservation park in Bunawan, Philippines on February 12, 2013. The 21-foot (6.4-metre) monster, died on February 10, 2012, is suspected of eating a local man who went missing in July 2011 and of killing a 12-year-old girl whose head was bitten off in 2009, was caught in a remote southern creek on September 3, 2011.

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Amazon Rainforest
Pará
By Ralf Falbe
15 Jan 2013

Smoke rises from a slash-and-burn site in the Amazon Rainforest in Pará State, Brazil

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Spotted Sandgrouse
By awaheed.lifesinai
31 Dec 2012

Sand grouses are common desert birds. The species pictured can be found in the Sinai and Eastern Desert of Egypt. The sand grouse has a musical, “queeto-queeto” call which distinguishes it from similar-looking species. This is how the bird was given its Arabic name, “Qata.”

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Spotted sandgrouse
By awaheed.lifesinai
31 Dec 2012

A close-up picture of the spotted sand grouse taken in the desert near Ra’s Gharib, Red Sea Governorate.

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western Reef Egret
Hurghada
By awaheed.lifesinai
31 Dec 2012

The Western Reef egret looks like the cattle egret but lives on the shores of lakes and other large bodies of water and eats fish. The Western Reef egret is also known as the Western Reef heron. It is a medium-sized bird with an extremely wide range. It is native to the coasts of tropical West Africa, the Red Sea, the Persian Gulf and eastwards to India. It sometimes appears in Brazil, the Caribbean, North America and the Cocos Islands in the eastern Indian Ocean.

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Wildlife Crimes (47 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
31 Oct 2012

This is just one of 16 tigers cubs seized on Friday (26 Oct) after a botched effort to smuggle the tiger cubs across the border from Thailand in Laos. A veterinary team from the wildlife forensic unit are taking blood samples to trace the DNA. Chaiyaphum, Thailand.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crisis (45 of 47)
Payuhakirri, Thailand
By James Morgan
30 Oct 2012

A master Ivory carver at work in Payuhakirri, Thailand. Many carvers claim to use domestic as opposed to African Ivory.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (44 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
29 Oct 2012

A lady wears an Ivory necklace in Tha Phrachan market, Bangkok, Thailand. Ornamental ivory is valued for both spiritual and aesthetic reasons and fetches high prices.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (42 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
29 Oct 2012

Ivory braclets on sale in Tha Phrachan market, Thailand. Ornamental ivory is valued for both spiritual and aesthetic reasons and fetches high prices.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (43 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
29 Oct 2012

An officer from the Natural Resource and Environment Crime Suppression Division (NRESCD) inspects a shop selling ivory in Tha Phrachan market, Bangkok, Thailand. Ornamental ivory is valued for both spiritual and aesthetic reasons and fetches high prices.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (36 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

An exorcist's knife for sale in Bangkok. The handle and sheath are made from Ivory.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (37 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

An amulet store owner inspects a statue of an ascetic monk made from Ivory. He will sell it for 35,000 baht (1,200 USD)

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (40 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

Dr Suchitra Changtragoon, the lead researcher at the Department of National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation's biolab is in charge of conducting DNA tests on confiscated ivory. African Ivory is illegal, wereas, confusingly, Asian Ivory is not.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (39 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

Researchers at the Department of National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation's biolab conduct DNA tests on confiscated Ivory in order to determine it source of origin and thus prosecute people found in possession of African Ivroy.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (41 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
28 Oct 2012

Researchers at the Department of National Park, Wildlife and Plant Conservation's biolab conduct DNA tests on tiger blood and other animal parts in order to try and crack down on the illegal trade. Bangkok, Thailand.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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In the land of God: the Huaorani trib...
Pastaza Ecuador
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
27 Oct 2012

Cononaco Bameno-Ecuador(South America) October 27th-2012-EXCLUSIVE FEATURE STORY.
The Huaorani, also known as the Waos, are native Amerindians from the Amazonian Region of Ecuador (Napo, Orellana and Pastaza Provinces) who have marked differences from other ethnic groups from Ecuador. They comprise almost 4,000 inhabitants and speak the Huaorani language, a linguistic isolate that is not known to be related to any other language. Their ancestral lands are located between the Curaray and Napo rivers, about 50 miles (80 km) south of El Coca. These homelands – approximately 120 miles (190 km) wide and 75 to 100 miles (120 to 160 km) from north to south – are threatened by oil exploration. In 1993, the Huaorani, and Quichua indigenous people, filed a lawsuit against Texaco oil company for the environmental damages caused by oil extraction activities in the Lago Agrio oil field. After handing control of the oil fields to an Ecuadorian oil company, Texaco did not properly dispose of its hazardous waste, causing great damages to the ecosystem and crippling communities. And recently, an US oil giant, has been fined $8.6 billion, for causing devastating pollution in large parts of the Ecuadorian Amazon basin, where Huaorani tribe lives. The oil firm Texaco, wich merged with Chevron in 2001, had been accused of dumping billions of gallons of toxic waste into unlined pits in the Amazon’s rainforest and rivers. Tribes indigenous to the area, like the Huaorani, have campaigned for almost two decades against the firm’s actions, saying that the poisonous waste has increased cancer rates, killed wildlife and contaminated water.In the past, Huaorani were able to protect their culture and lands from both indigenous enemies and settlers but the fighting against the multinational oil company, still goes on.
In the last 40 years, they have shifted from a hunting and gathering society to live mostly in permanent forest settlements. In traditional animist Huaorani worldview, there is no distinction between the physical and spiritual worlds, and spirits are present throughout the world. The Huaorani once believed that the entire world was a forest (and used the same word, ömë, for both). The Oriente’s rainforest of Ecuador, remains the essential basis of their physical and cultural survival. For them, the forest is home, while the outside world is considered unsafe: living in the forest offered protection from the witchcraft and attacks of neighboring peoples.
The Huaorani believe the animals of their forest have a spiritual as well as physical existence. They believe that a person who dies walks a trail to the afterlife which has a large anaconda snake lying in wait. Those among the dead who cannot escape the snake fail to enter the domain of dead spirits and return to Earth to become animals, often termites. This underlies a mix of practices that recognize and respect animals, but does not shield them from harm for human use.
Hunting supplies a major part of the Huaorani diet and is of cultural significance. Traditionally, the creatures hunted were limited to monkeys, birds, and wild peccaries. Neither land-based predators nor birds of prey are hunted. Traditionally there was an extensive collection of hunting and eating taboos. They refused to eat deer, on the grounds that deer eyes look similar to human eyes. While a joyful activity, hunting (even permitted animals) has ethical ramifications: “The Huaorani must kill animals to live, but they believed dead animal spirits live on and must be placated or else do harm in angry retribution.” To counterbalance the offense of hunting, a shaman demonstrated respect through the ritual preparation of the poison, curare, used in blow darts. Hunting with such darts is not considered killing, but retrieving, essentially a kind of harvesting from the trees. Spearing wild peccaries, on the other hand, is killing and is practiced with violence and rage.
While never hunted, two other animals, the snake and the jaguar, have special significance for the Huaorani. Snakes are considered "the most evil force in the Huaorani cosmology", particularly the imposing (though nonvenemous) anaconda, or obe. A giant obe stands in the way of the forest trail that the dead follow to an afterlife with the creator in the sky. Here on earth, snakes are a bad omen, and traditionally killing them is considered taboo.
The Huaorani identify deeply with the jaguar, an important and majestic predator in the Oriente province of Ecuador. According to myth, the Huaorani were the descendants of a mating between a jaguar and an eagle. Elders became shamans by metaphorically adopting “jaguar sons” whose spirits communicate medical and spiritual knowledge. In the Huaorani belief system, jaguar shamans are able “to become a jaguar, and so to travel great distances telepathically and communicate with other Huaorani.”
Plants, especially trees, continue to hold a complex and important interest for the Huaorani. Their store of botanical knowledge is extensive, ranging from knowledge of materials to poisons to hallucinogens to medicines. They also relate plants to their own experiences, particularly that of growing. Among trees, certain kinds are auspicious. Canopy trees, with their distinctly colored young leaves and striking transformation as they mature to towering giants, are “admired for their solitary character … as well as for their profuse entanglement” with other plants. Other significant trees are the pioneer species of the peach palm (used for making spears and blowguns, as well as for fruit), and fast-growing balsa wood, used for ceremonial purposes. Peach palm trees are associated with past settlements and the ancestors who live there.
The Huaorani notion of time is particularly oriented to the present, with few obligations extending backwards or forwards in time. Their one word for future times, baane, also means "tomorrow". Spears are the main weapons of the Huaorani culture used in person to person conflict.
Their main hunting weapon is the blowgun. These weapons are typically from 3 to 4 metres long. The arrows used are dipped in curare poison, which paralyzes the muscles of the animal which is hit with it, so that it cannot breathe. Kapok fluff is used to create an air-tight seal, by twisting the fibers around the end of the dart or arrow. The pictures shows a huaorani family, navigating on the Cononaco Bameno river with their pirogue.

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Wildlife Crimes (35 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
27 Oct 2012

The head of the infantry unit on patrol in Kui Buri National park.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (32 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
26 Oct 2012

In light of the recent escalation in poaching the Thai government have assigned a unit of xxx to help tackle the poaching issue.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (33 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
26 Oct 2012

In light of the recent escalation in poaching the Thai government have assigned a unit of xxx to help tackle the poaching issue.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (34 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
26 Oct 2012

In light of the recent escalation in poaching the Thai government have assigned a special ops military unit to help tackle the poaching issue. This military outfit patrol the border between Thailand and Myanmar looking for tiger smugglers and other wildlife criminals.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (46 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
26 Oct 2012

Elephants are not the only commodity being traded. This year has also seen a rise in the illegal sale of rhinos and tigers. This is just one of 16 tigers cubs seized on Friday (26 Oct).

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (31 of 47)
Bangkok, Thailand
By James Morgan
25 Oct 2012

Sampan Suksee a park ranger prepares to leave on patrol.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON

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Wildlife Crimes (27 of 47)
Suvarnabhumi, Bangkok
By James Morgan
24 Oct 2012

Workers at the customs department in Bangkok's Suvarnabhumi Airport open a box of seized Ivory.

James Morgan / WWF-CANON