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The other pandemic
Mexico City
By mahelipe
15 Dec 2020

Rising levels of stress, economic, food insecurity and isolation due to Covid-19, have dramatically increased levels of domestic violence in Mexico and require immediate action to protect women and children at risk. Calls to shelters, reporting violence have increased by 60 to 80% and asylum requests in these spaces have increased by 30%, according to the Red Nacional de Refugios. However, the level of domestic violence remains today underestimated by the government, which considers the facts as non-priority in the current situation. The context is such that, since the start of the confinement, the government of President AMLO has removed numerous subsidies intended for associations fighting against gender violence. Thus, many organizations and associations have had no other choice than to act on their own to respond to this health crisis and support women at risk. Social workers, activists, lawyers and psychologists ... are numerous to have mobilized to face this emergency situation. 

In addition, government campaigns to prevent domestic violence have been very limited since the onset of the crisis and what little has been achieved has been widely criticized by feminist activists campaigning against violence against women. 

 

The issue of information dissemination is also an issue that activists faced very quickly when lockdown began in Mexico in March 2020. I therefore wanted to produce a report illustrating the increase in domestic violence due to COVID-19, highlighting the solutions and possibilities available to victims. The aim is to give visibility to facts that the government refuses to consider, while highlighting the hard work of many social workers in the midst of a health crisis. 

By following the daily shelter for battered women, the psychological help for women victims of violence and aggressive men as well as the intervention of the gender police, this report offers a look at the second pandemic that affected Mexico: violence against women.

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HOMBRES POR LA EQUIDAD
Mexico City
By mahelipe
09 Dec 2020

Meeting of the association "Hombres por la equidad". This association, made up of ten members, has taken it upon itself since the start of the confinement to provide a free support group for violent men. Twice a week the men meet by video conference to talk about their excess of aggressiveness, accompanied by a psychologist, they learn to channel their anger in order to avoid domestic violence.

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APIS DONATION
Ciudad De Mexico, Ciudad De Mexico
By mahelipe
05 May 2020

APIS Centre Foundation for Equity, receives donated clothes and food for women at risk and victims of domestic violence, amidst the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Bag of donations collected by the APIS Center for women at risk. COVID-19 kit, and foods are distributed for free every week in the popular Michoacana district of Mexico City.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 29
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

10-year-old Anatoliy Eliseev, from Uzbekistan, does his homework, while his mother Nina does the laundry at home in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva, 33, arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by her ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing the scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 30
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, and her son Anatoliy, 10, are leaving their home, in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 31
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, with her son Anatoliy, 10, walk around their neighborhood, in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 33
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, travels by subway in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 32
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, does her shopping in a supermarket in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 34
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, enters to a Metro station after doing her shopping in a supermarket in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 35
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, travels by subway in Barcelona, Spain, after doing her shopping.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 36
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, travels by subway in Barcelona, Spain, after doing her shopping.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 37
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, arrives at home in Barcelona, Spain, with her shopping.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 39
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, arrives at home in Barcelona, Spain, with her shopping.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 40
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, does her laundry at home in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by her ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 41
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, walks in Barcelona city center, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by her ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 38
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, and her son Anatoliy, 10, wait to start a music concert in Centre Civic Drassanes, in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 42
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, and her son Anatoliy, 10, wait for the start of a music concert in Centre Civic Drassanes, in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Asylum Seekers in Spain 43
Barcelona, Spain
By Albert Gonzalez Farran
05 Jun 2015

Nina Eliseeva, 33, from Uzbekistan, meets her brother Ivan at his bar in Barcelona, Spain.
Nina Eliseeva arrived in Barcelona in November 2013, after suffering many years of harassment by his ex-husband back home. She is Catholic and her husband's family is Muslim and repudiated her for not wearing scarf and not practicing Islam. She took her son Anatoliy and migrated to Barcelona, where her brother Ivan was living. After nearly two years, she finally obtained asylum status and got a job as a shopkeeper. She wants to remain in Barcelona and reunite with her parents.

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Sample media
TALPAPRIL2017-12
London
By Tom Price
10 Mar 2015

Still photography selection from various assignments and projects.

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HK Domestic Workers 01
Hong Kong
By Miguel Candela
23 Jun 2014

Dora poses behind a traditional Indonesian wooden mask in front of the police station where she reported physical abuse and conditions of slave labor at the whim of her employer.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 26
Montevideo, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
05 Feb 2014

Women escaping domestic violence, drug addiction and crime in a shelter and rehab center in Montevideo make dust rags. Domestic violence is widespread across Latin America including in this small, mostly rural country with an average of 68 reports of gender based violence made daily in Montevideo.

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Another Sky: An Uruguayan journey 27
Montevideo, Uruguay
By Francesco Pistilli
05 Feb 2014

Stella, 32, comes from the Uruguayan countryside (Tacuarembo area). She and her autistic son were beaten and abused by her husband for 4 years. Since her husband was jailed for attempting to kill her, Stella lives with her son in a shelter for women escaping violence and addiction.

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Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
09 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
09 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
09 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (71 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

Frame 0004
Kinshasa Street Children - Raw Footag...
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (73 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (72 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (70 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (69 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (67 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (66 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (65 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (64 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (63 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (62 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (61 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.

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Kinshasa Street Children (60 of 73)
Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
By Piero Pomponi World Focus
01 Jun 2013

Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo | 09-06-2013
The problem of street children in Kinshasa continues to worsen, despite more than two thousand former street and orphaned children who have been housed and rehabilitated by a national government program. In the DR Congo, the street children are called “enfants sorciers,” meaning the witch kids who are usually victims of domestic violence, the HIV epidemic, early pregnancies, or suspected of practicing voodoo. Most of the children have confessed to pick-pocketing, regular drug use, expecially marijuana and sniffing petrol. A pilot project to rehabilitate thousands of children living on the streets of DR Congo is failing because government is excluding civil society from the rehabilitation program.Two years ago, the government began recruiting Kinshasa’s street kids and placing them into training centres under the auspices of the DR Congo National Service, to provide them trade skills, such as carpentry and tailoring. However following their graduation from life and trade skills training, the children often return to their old lives because there has been no planning by government on how the skills could be utilized by the kids to their benefit.