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Les eaux cachées [FR SCREENER]
Fez, Morocco
By Joe Lukawski
11 Feb 2015

FR SCREENER

Hidden Waters tells the story of water in Fez, Morocco, the cultural practices surrounding it, and those who aim to save it for future generations. In the medieval medina of Fez, water was once the motor of medieval commerce and industry as well as a source of well-being and luxury for its peoples. Today, as the old hydraulic system falls into disrepair and the river running through Fez is threatened by pollution; inhabitants of the medina depend on modern water sources that become more expensive as each well dries up and each old water channel breaks down. Can Fez’s famous waters be saved?

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Lebanese Town Fights to Stop Foreign...
Yarzeh
By Rachel K
11 Feb 2015

Yarzeh, Lebanon
February 13, 2015

An influential resident of the town of Yarzeh, which overlooks Beirut, and the Emirati Embassy in Lebanon are digging water wells, in violation of a municipal decree.
Digging wells was banned because it threatens water supplies in the neighbouring town of Baabda.
Concerned residents and the head of the municipal council in Yarzeh have petitioned the Lebanese authorities to stop the drilling. However, there are suspicions that the authorities are under pressure “from outside Lebanon” that prevents them from stopping the drilling.

TRANSCRIPT

SOUNDBITE (Man, Arabic) Bassam al-Qintar, Environmental Expert
00:07- 00: 22
“There are hundreds of thousands of wells that cover Lebanon’s surface from the north to the south. There is not been anyone in Lebanon who has not drilled a well. This is leading to the loss of Lebanon’s strategic water reserves.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Henry al-Helou, Head of Baabda and Yarzeh Municipal Council
00:27 – 01:24

“All the wells in Yarzeh need to be closed. When wells were dug in Yarzeh, there was a water shortage in Baabda. Previous municipal councils raised complaints to the concerned ministries. This is why there was a decision to ban well digging in Yarzeh. You are saying that there are wells being drilled; we have fulfilled our duties. You mentioned that Emirati Embassy and Mia Ayyoub [are digging wells]. The land where the Emirati Embassy [is being built] belongs to a foreign country and follows special regulations. As a municipality, we do not have the right to interfere with them. We have to refer to the concerned authorities about that. We cannot address this issue at the municipality. Concerning Mia Khoury – Mia Ayyoub Khoury – the well she is digging is adjacent to the main well Baabda. This is not allowed.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Recorded phone conversation
01:29 – 01:58

  • Hello
  • Who is this?
  • Are you Mr. Noel?
  • No. Who wants to talk to him?
  • We are from Transterra Media. We talked to him on Friday about an interview concerning the well being dug in his garden.
  • There is nothing, there is nothing…
  • We spoke to him on Friday, and he said that he will get back to us but he did not. I would like to know if they would like to talk in front of the camera.
  • I will tell him, OK.
  • I need to know because we want to film today. [Speaker hangs up].

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Claude Serhal, Resident of Yarezeh
01:59 – 02:32

“If you ask around in Baabda, you will be told that it is not allowed to dig any wells because they are worried about the water supplies. Each house in Yarzeh cannot have an individual well. There are problems. People need to abide by the law.” Some people say: ‘We are in Lebanon, where anything can be done.’ You seek someone’s help and they will let have whatever you want. On the other hand, what is happening to our environment? It is being sabotaged.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Jumana Ossaily, Director of the Yarzeh Development Association
02:34 – 02:54

“It is not allowed for each citizen to obtain a license to dig a well. If a well is dug at an embassy, for example, what could the rest of the Yarzeh’s residents do? Does each one of us has the right to dig a well in his garden?”

SOUNDBITE (English) – Reporter speaks to construction workers
02:55 – 03:16

  • Can we take pictures of the embassy?
  • No, no. It is not allowed.
  • What is this here?
  • I don’t know. Talk to [staff] members. I am a guard.
  • When did they start the work?
  • I don’t know, about a week ago.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Jumana Ossaily, Director of the Yarzeh Development Association
03:17 – 03:25

“I think the problem is that there is large pressure from outside Lebanon. The head of the Municipal Council cannot stop this and neither can we.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Man) Henry al-Helou, Head of Baabda and Yarzeh Municipal Council
03:25 – 03:38

“We have followed the necessary procedures. We petitioned to the Beirut and Mount Lebanon Water Company, and we demanded that the well digging be stopped. That was on February 4, 2015.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Jumana Ossaily, Director of the Yarzeh Development Association
03:39 – 03:56

“We sent a petition to the governor of Mount Lebanon. We sent a letter to the Ministry of Interior. We sent a letter to the Emirati Embassy and we tried to have an appointment with the Ambassador to address this issue, but we did not receive any reply.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Claude Serhal, A Resident of Yarezeh
03:57 – 04:14

“This is a message to anyone in Yarzeh who is not applying the law. We cannot make exceptions for each person, whether this person is Lebanese or not.”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Jumana Ossaily, Director of the Yarzeh Development Association
04:14 – 04:41

“‘I hear some Yarzeh residents say when they see that other people are digging wells, ‘Why can we not dig wells, too?’ If I went to the Emirates and decided to dig a well – even if I represented an embassy – I know that I would need a permit. What should I do then? Should I break the law? What would they do to me if I broke the law?”

SOUNDBITE (Arabic, Woman) Claude Serhal, Resident of Yarezeh
04:42 – 04:49

“In the future, what will happen to Lebanon – not only Yarzeh – if everyone did whatever they wanted?”

SOUNDBITE (Man, Arabic) Bassam al-Qintar, Environmental Expert
04:49 – 05:17

“Each year, we are extracting water from wells at a pace that is depleting underground water. We have a very long summer and short winter and precipitation is scarce. If we carry on extracting underground water at the same rate, we will have a very severe drought and water resources will became salinized. A large number of these wells have already dried up.”

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
17 Sep 2013

Traditional oil miner gathers buckets of crude oil to begin the distillation process of converting it into diesel fuel. Distillation is accomplished by heating the filtered crude oil to between 200 °C (392 °F) and 350 °C (662 °F). Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Moroccan Village of Afeyen
Afayane, Morocco
By Martin Jay
05 Mar 2011

Footage that shows scenic view and streets of Afayane, in the Souss-Massa-Draa province, Morocco, in 2009.

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
26 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner scoops crude out of collection tank. The oil which has settled on the top of the water will be distilled into diesel when heated in an oil drum and then sold. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil wells in Bojonegoro a regency in East Java. Previously known as a major producer of teak and tobacco, Bojonegoro is now the focus of renewed attention after a new oil field was found in the area. Bojonegoro, Indonesia.

Traditional oil wells in Bojonegoro Indonesia. Bojonegoro is a regency in East Java, Indonesia, about 110 km west of Surabaya. Previously known as a major producer of teak and tobacco, Bojonegoro is the focus of attention in Indonesia as a new oil field has been found in this area. This oil find is the biggest oil discovery in Indonesia in three decades and one of the biggest reserve in Indonesia.

This part of Java has had a long association with oil, and the Dutch, Indonesia's former colonial rulers, operated oil fields in the area although never realized the potential of Cepu. Freelance oil men use rickety wooden frames with pulleys, a few still operated by hand, to retrieve oil in wells up to 400 meters (1,300ft) deep. They then heat the oil on wood fires to burn off water. Miners said they could earn from 200,000 rupiah ($20) a day shared between a team of at least three.

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miners prepare the hoisting system for a new oil derrick. As they prepare to drill a new well. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miners prepare the hoisting system for a new oil derrick. As they prepare to drill a new well. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miners prepare the hoisting system for a new oil derrick. As they prepare to drill a new well. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miners prepare the hoisting system for a new oil derrick. As they prepare to drill a new well. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

A motorcycle is loaded with drums of diesel ready to be transported to nearby villages to be sold. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

A motorcycle is loaded with drums of diesel ready to be transported to nearby villages to be sold. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner separates water from the crude oil in the collection tank. The oil which has settled on the top of the water will be distilled into diesel when heated in an oil drum and then sold. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner pours some crude oil into a steal drum as part of the distillation process, creating diesel fuel. Distillation is accomplished by heating the filtered crude oil to between 200 °C (392 °F) and 350 °C (662 °F). Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miners finish off the construction of a new oil derrick made of trees from the surrounding forest. This area in Cepu Indonesia is known as the 'eternal oil field'. Miners frequently set up new oil wells in the area. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miners prepare the pulley system for a new oil derrick this area in Cepu Indonesia is known as the 'eternal oil field'. Miners frequently set up new oil wells in the area. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miners prepare a disused oil derrick for renewed operation. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

Thumb sm
Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil wells in Bojonegoro a regency in East Java. Previously known as a major producer of teak and tobacco, Bojonegoro is now the focus of renewed attention after a new oil field was found in the area. Bojonegoro, Indonesia. 25/01/2011.

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner finishes his shift on the oil derrick. Miners use a fork shaped stick to insure the down shaft is correctly positioned when pumping oil. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Oil is pumped from the ground using a truck engine. The body of the truck is discarded and the engine and gearbox are set on the ground. A cable is wound around one of the wheels, which is then attached to the down hole pump. The operator puts the engine in neutral to drop the pump into the hole, and then puts it in reverse to wind up the wheel and pump out the crude oil/water emulsion. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

A traditional oil miner takes a rest as he waits for his processed diesel to be collect for sale in nearby villages. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Distilled diesel oil pours into a tank as miner waits for the sale to a distributor, when it will be sold in nearby villages.

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner pours diesel fuel into drums which will be transported to nearby villages to be sold. Miners said they could earn from 200,000 rupiah ($20) a day shared between a team of at least three. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

A down hole pump releases a wave of crude oil and water onto the ground as part of the process of oil extraction. The miner uses a branch to control the down hole pump as it exits the ground. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner prepares a fresh barrel with which to distil crude oil into diesel. Oil drums are buried in the ground with a pit dug beneath for the fire, creating a kilning effect the refining process can begin, lasting around 6-8 hours. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia.
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner prepares a fresh barrel with which to distil crude oil into diesel. Oil drums are buried in the ground with a pit dug beneath for the fire, creating a kilning effect the refining process can begin, lasting around 6-8 hours. Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

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Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Miners watch on from the hill side as a new oil derrick is constructed. Cepu, Indonesia. 24/01/2011

Thumb sm
Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
25 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner gathers buckets of crude oil to begin the distillation process of converting it into diesel fuel. Distillation is accomplished by heating the filtered crude oil to between 200 °C (392 °F) and 350 °C (662 °F). Cepu, Indonesia. 25/01/2011

Thumb sm
Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
24 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miners take a rest from work. Previously known as a major producer of teak and tobacco, Bojonegoro is the focus of attention in Indonesia as a new oil field has been found in this area. This oil find is the biggest oil discovery in Indonesia in three decades and one of the biggest reserve in Indonesia. Cepu, Indonesia. 24/01/2011

Thumb sm
Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
24 Jan 2011

Traditional oil miner watches on as oil is extracted and then sent through a filtration system consisting of small channels dug into the hillside. The crude oil/water emulsion is filtered as it pours into pools and oil drums, and is eventually collected and then heated. The heated crude is distilled into diesel fuel. Cepu, Indonesia. 24/01/2011

Thumb sm
Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
24 Jan 2011

Traditional oil wells in Bojonegoro Indonesia. Bojonegoro is a regency in East Java, Indonesia, about 110 km west of Surabaya. Previously known as a major producer of teak and tobacco, Bojonegoro is the focus of attention in Indonesia as a new oil field has been found in this area. This oil find is the biggest oil discovery in Indonesia in three decades and one of the biggest reserve in Indonesia. Cepu, Indonesia. 24/01/2011

Thumb sm
Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
24 Jan 2011

Traditional oil wells in Bojonegoro a regency in East Java. Previously known as a major producer of teak and tobacco, Bojonegoro is now the focus of renewed attention after a new oil field was found in the area. Bojonegoro, Indonesia. 24/01/2011.

Thumb sm
Traditional oil wells East Java Indon...
Cepu, Indonesia
By Jeffrey Bright
23 Jan 2011

In Bojonegoro Indonesia, oil is extracted and then sent through a filtration system consisting of small channels dug into the hillside. The crude oil/water emulsion is filtered as it pours into pools and oil drums, and is eventually collected and then heated. The heated crude is distilled into diesel fuel. Cepu, Indonesia. 23/01/2011