Daily Life After the Spring in Yemen

Collection with 28 media items created by Serene Yordi

01 Aug 2013 10:00

A picture of daily life in Yemen after early 2011 when the Yemeni youth took the streets and forced the ouster of Yemen’s autocratic President, Ali Abdullah Saleh. Yemen, one of the poorest countries in the Arab World, is now experiencing a transition rife with political corruption, unemployment, a real proliferation of AQAP (Al Qaida in the Arab Peninsula) and a depletion of natural resources. But though Yemen continues to feel the consequences post-revolution, people carry on their day to day work, traditional and holiday celebrations, as well as protests in the streets. The photographer documented this everyday existence over the course of a year in Yemen.

Yemen North Africa Landscape Environment Photo Essay Photo Collec... Collection Lifestyle Culture Religion

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After the Spring in Yemen (3 of 28)
Hodeidah, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Aug 2013

An empty market during the afternoon in Hodeidah city. The afternoon is the time for chewing qat, a plant widely cultivated in Yemen, whose leaves contain a compound with effects similar to those of amphetamines. Among the people from the Arabian penisula and the horn of Africa, qat chewing has a long history as a social custom dating back thousands of years. Studies have shown that only in Yemen, almost 80% of its population spend 3 to 4 hours a day chewing the plant. Moreover, the enormous need for water of the qat industry is on course to make the capital, Sana’a, the first in the world to completely run out of water.

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After the Spring in Yemen (4 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Aug 2013

Check point at the entrance of the Shia Houthi celebration of the Prophet Mohammed's anniversary in the outskirts of Sana'a, where every individual has to step on the United States and Israel flags in order to get inside the venue. Tens of thousands gathered at the event. The Houthi slogan written on their headbands reads: "Death to America, death to Israel, damn the Jews and victory to Islam".

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After the Spring in Yemen (5 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Aug 2013

Kids play soccer in the impoverished Museik neighborhood.

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After the Spring in Yemen (8 of 28)
Hodeidah, Yemen
By dustweare
10 Oct 2012

A market during the afternoon, Hodeidah city. The afternoon is the time for chewing qat, a plant widely cultivated in Yemen, whose leaves contain a compound with effects similar to those of amphetamines. Among the people from the Arabian penisula and the horn of Africa, qat chewing has a long history as a social custom dating back thousands of years. Studies have shown that only in Yemen, almost 80% of its population spend 3 to 4 hours a day chewing the plant. Moreover, the enormous need for water of the qat industry is on course to make the capital, Sana’a, the first in the world to completely run out of water.

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After the Spring in Yemen (9 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
11 Sep 2012

March in the streets of Sana'a against the still powerful Yemeni ex-president, Ali Adullah Saleh, who was ousted from the presidency after a series of popular protests across the main cities in 2011, which ended in the brink of civil war.

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After the Spring in Yemen (10 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
31 Jul 2013

Flooded street in Old Sanaa during Ramadan, the rainy season. This photo was taken right before "Magreb", the prayer call to break the fast.

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After the Spring in Yemen (12 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
19 Aug 2012

Playful children the first day of Eid holidays dressing new clothes and handling bb guns in Old Sana'a. Yemen is the second most heavily armed society in the World after the United States.

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After the Spring in Yemen (13 of 28)
Thula, Yemen
By dustweare
26 Aug 2012

The groom and his father. A wedding in Thula, Amran province.

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After the Spring in Yemen (14 of 28)
Al-mahweet, Yemen
By dustweare
26 Apr 2013

Man chewing qat by a window in his house in Al-Dawila. Al-Mahweet governorate.

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After the Spring in Yemen (15 of 28)
Thula, Yemen
By dustweare
26 Aug 2012

Jambiya dance during the celebration of a wedding in Thula, the Haraz mountains, province of Amran. Dating back centuries to the pre-Islamic era, the Yemeni dagger is used for self-defense and in traditional dance.

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After the Spring in Yemen (16 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
29 Jul 2012

Two boys relaxing inside the Grand Saleh mosque, Sana'a. Inaugurated in November 2008, it can hold up to 40,000 worshippers and cost nearly 60 million US dollars to build. A number not easy to digest given the country's suffering from various widespread different kinds of humanitarian crisis.

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After the Spring in Yemen (17 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
05 Mar 2013

The entrance of a museum that Ali Abdullah Saleh, Yemen's deposed president, opened to honor himself. The gallery is located inside the Grand Saleh mosque, in Sana'a. The centerpiece of the museum are the charred clothes he was wearing when a bomb exploded in the Grand Saleh mosque aiming to end his life in 2011. Also complementing the garments, there is a display of pieces of shrapnel found in his body afterwards.

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After the Spring in Yemen (18 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
29 Jul 2013

The Grand Saleh mosque, Sana'a. Inaugurated in November 2008, it can hold up to 40,000 worshippers and cost nearly 60 million US dollars to build despite Yemen being the Arab world's poorest nation.

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After the Spring in Yemen (19 of 28)
Hammam, Yemen
By dustweare
11 Jul 2013

Kid walks through the khat fields of his family holding the Quran in the sacred month of Ramadan.

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After the Spring in Yemen (20 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
20 Aug 2012

Souq Hajjar, a qat marquet in Sana'a. The qat is a plant widely cultivated in Yemen, whose leaves contain a compound with effects similar to those of amphetamines. Among the people from the Arabian penisula and the horn of Africa, qat chewing has a long history as a social custom dating back thousands of years. Studies have shown that only in Yemen, almost 80% of its population spend 3 to 4 hours a day chewing the plant. Moreover, the enormous need for water of the qat industry is on course to make the capital, Sana’a, the first in the world to completely run out of water.

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After the Spring in Yemen (21 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
20 Sep 2012

March in the streets of Sana'a against the still powerful Yemeni ex-president, Ali Adullah Saleh, who was ousted from the presidency after a series of popular protests across the main cities in 2011, which ended in the brink of civil war.

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After the Spring in Yemen (24 of 28)
Kawkaban, Yemen
By dustweare
20 Aug 2012

Two women walking during the midday prayer call in the village of Kawkaban, the Haraz Mountains, province of Al-Mahweet.

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After the Spring in Yemen (26 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
11 Sep 2012

March in the streets of Sana'a against the still powerful Yemeni ex-president, Ali Adullah Saleh, who was ousted from the presidency after a series of popular protests across the main cities in 2011, which ended in the brink of civil war.

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After the Spring in Yemen (27 of 28)
Sanaa, Yemen
By dustweare
06 Aug 2012

Rooftop view in Old Sana'a. Sana'a has been inhabited for more than 2,500 years, one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. In the 7th and 8th centuries the city became a major centre for the propagation of Islam. This religious and political heritage can be seen in the 103 mosques, 14 hammams and over 6,000 houses, all built before the 11th century. At an altitude of 2,300 metres (7,500 ft), it is also one of the highest capital cities in the world.

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After the Spring in Yemen (28 of 28)
Hadramawt, Yemen
By dustweare
01 Aug 2013

Aerial view of the vast harsh lands in Hadramawt province.